United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə6/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

V.
 
F
EASIBILITY
 
 
i.
 
Cost efficiency and effectiveness:  
 
The project is designed to ensure that investments are the most cost effective so that project approaches 
and  institutional  mechanisms  are  easily  replicated  and  scaled  up  using  existing  budgetary  constraints 
operative  within  Fiji.  Removing  barriers  that  impede  the  comprehensive  management  of  IAS  in  the 
country  will  vastly  improve  conservation  of  vulnerable  ecosystems  that  contain  biodiversity  of  global 
significance.  
 
The project will use existing government and local-level institutional arrangements for delivery of project 
interventions,  rather  than  create  additional  and  costly  alternative  project-specific  institutions.  In 

51 | 
P a g e
 
 
particular, the project will operate through the existing institutional arrangements within BAF in Nadi and 
Suva  and  through  its  front-line  staff  positions  outside  of  Viti  Levu  to  help  coordinate,  oversee  and 
implement project-related activities. Most importantly, the project will build on and complement existing 
national and district government programs and NGO programs for improving biosecurity and eradication 
measures  so  as  to  engineer  a  more  comprehensive  approach  to  better  protect  the  country  from  IAS 
threats. This is a very cost effective approach, because it does not add significant personnel resources to 
biosecurity,  but  instead  uses  existing  national,  state,  private  sector  and  community  resources  to 
demonstrate a comprehensive approach that meets both conservation and local community participation. 
Most project investment is geared toward improving training of existing staff through interaction with 
outside  technical  experts.  The  project  will  also  set  up  a  national  multi-sectoral  and  multi-sectoral 
mechanism  to  deal  with  IAS  issues.  This  multi-sectoral  approach  will  ensure  the  best  possible  use  of 
resources  and  capacities  and  likewise  ensuring  the  best  possible  outcomes,  including:  prevention, 
management, eradication, awareness and restoration as needed and when feasible.  
 
The project also upgrades technological capacities in Fiji for responding to IAS. In terms of eradication, 
firstly, it will use less expensive rifles than more sophisticated interventions. Secondly, it will make use of 
trained local dogs and dog handlers that are more suited to the environmental conditions of Fiji. Thirdly 
it will train local villagers to be able to detect and shoot GII. Fourthly, it will support an extensive outreach 
program  to  get  local  communities  more  vigilant  and  report  any  GII  sighting,  which  will  increase  the 
number of persons involved in efforts to locate and eradicate GII. Work to identify actual and potential 
impacts on livelihoods will be used to inform outreach campaigns and support these efforts. These are 
cost-effective approaches to GII eradication. 
 
ii.
 
Risk Management:  
 
As per standard UNDP requirements, the Project Coordinator will monitor risks quarterly and report on 
the status of risks to the UNDP Country Office. The UNDP Country Office will record progress in the UNDP 
ATLAS risk log. Risks will be reported as critical when the impact and probablity are high (i.e. when impact 
is rated as 5, and when impact is rated as 4 and probability is rated at 3 or higher). Management responses 
to  critical  risks  will  also  be  reported  to  the  GEF  in  the  annual  PIR.    The  projected  risks,  impacts  and 
mitigation measures are discussed in Table 3 below. 
 
Table 3: Project Risks, Impacts and Management Measures 
 
Description 
Type 
Impact & Probability 
Mitigation Measures 
Owner 
Conflicts of 
interest and 
different 
priorities of 
stakeholders 
constrain 
implementation 
of activities 
Political 
Local communities might display 
resistance to the killing of GII, 
which may have a profound 
impact of locating and 
eradicating GIIs. Consequently, 
the long term impact might be 
the non-containment of GIIs 
within the four islands and 
elsewhere in Fiji  
P=3; I=3 (Moderate) 
Needs and priorities of stakeholders will 
be identified, and constructive dialogue, 
joint planning and problem solving will 
be promoted through the multi-
stakeholder, inter-sectoral coordination 
mechanism. Interest will also be fostered 
among stakeholders by making the 
economic case for strengthened 
biosecurity measures to prevent and 
control IAS. 
BAF 
 
 

52 | 
P a g e
 
 
Insufficient 
funding to 
continue 
necessary IAS 
management 
after the project 
ends 
Financial  
The lack of funding can have a 
serious impact on improving 
biosecurity measures in Fiji, in 
particular the control and spread 
of IAS between islands as well as 
sustaining the eradication effort 
beyond the life of the GEF 
project, which is necessary to 
completely eradicate GIIs from 
the country.  
P=1; I=4 (Moderate) 
Governmental support for biosecurity 
and IAS management has increased in 
recent years along with an increased 
awareness of the economic/ 
environmental impacts of IAS. While, this 
is encouraging and likely to continue, 
significant additional budgetary 
resources would be required in the 
future to deal with the expanding threat 
of IAS, including strengthening inter-
island biosecurity, developing early 
detection and rapid response systems, 
strengthening awareness and improving 
risk assessment for organisms proposed 
for import. The project will take 
advantage of the government 
commitment to biosecurity to continue 
to raise awareness, and bring in further 
information to guide decision making on 
investments, including providing with 
detailed analysis of the overall cost of 
IAS to the Fiji economy and promote 
increased and efficient government 
budget allocations and revenue 
generation for IAS management over the 
long-term.  
Ministry of 
Economy, Public 
Enterprise, Public 
Services and 
Communication 
(MEPEPSC)  
 
 
Governmental 
agencies/ 
private 
companies 
unwilling to 
share 
information/ 
data 
Organizational 
The lack of a comprehensive IAS 
informational sources at the 
national level, constraints the 
effective prevention, 
management and awareness of 
IAS in Fiji as existing knowledge 
and information will not be 
readily accessible to all 
stakeholders and no 
comprehensive source of 
information will exist. 
P=3; I=2 (Moderate) 
Information and knowledge generation, 
management and dissemination are a 
key component of this project. Open-
access and the mutual benefits of 
information sharing will be included in all 
agreements for databases, websites, etc. 
sponsored by the project. 
Ministry of 
Economy, Public 
Enterprise, Public 
Services and 
Communication 
(MEPEPSC) 
 
Local knowledge 
and personnel 
resources may 
not be adequate 
to guarantee 
comprehensive 
planning and 
implementation 
Organizational 
While BAF and its partner 
agencies have significant 
numbers of front-line staff, 
training opportunities are limited.  
Front-line staff do not have full 
knowledge in terms of pest 
identification, control measures, 
eradication methods, etc. Mid-
level staff that should be involved 
in policy setting tasks appear 
limited. Technical capacities to 
identify pathways, commodities 
and organisms that present an 
IAS risk, or to measure the 
threats and impacts of IAS, are 
still rudimentary. Information on 
the economic impacts of IAS (on 
biodiversity, livelihoods and key 
economic sectors) and the costs 
A needs assessment for capacity building 
of government, district and local 
community organizations would be 
undertaken, following which a 
comprehensive training strategy and 
plan for front-line staff and local 
communities would be designed and 
developed early during project 
implementation. International experts 
will be hired to facilitate the conduct of 
the training programs, as well as staff 
will be able to participate in regional 
training programs.  Training programs 
would be regularly evaluated for their 
effectiveness and adjusted to meet the 
needs. BAF will recruit and/or promote 
and train a coterie of mid-level planning 
staff. In addition, BAF will recruit 
additional front-line staff who would be 
sufficiently trained and posted to 
BAF 
 
 

53 | 
P a g e
 
 
of different interventions is not 
available 
P=2; I=3 (Moderate) 
improve its capacity on the four islands 
site for reducing the potential for 
unwanted non-native species to enter 
and establish within the country or 
portions of the country for those IAS 
which are already established but not 
wide spread.  A comprehensive strategy 
for GII eradication would be developed 
and implemented, along with specialized 
training to improve staff skills at survey 
and detection of GIIs and in improved 
eradication methods.   
Not all GIIs are 
likely to be 
killed during an 
eradication 
operation 
because animals 
are difficult to 
detect 
Environmental 
The arboreal and shy nature of 
the GII makes detection of 
animals very difficult.  As a result, 
it is yet unknown whether most 
animals can be placed at risk of 
removal.   
I = 3; P = 3 (Moderate) 
Iguana detection is very difficult, but 
capture probability can be improved by 
targeting females at nesting sites and by 
using canine teams.  Use of rifles will 
greatly improve removal rates, and low-
cost conservation drones will be tested 
for their ability to improve GII 
detectability. 
BAF 
 
 
Eradication 
activities of 
Giant Invasive 
Iguana (GII) 
under the 
project may 
pose a risk to 
native 
endangered 
species (Fiji 
banded iguana; 
Brachylophus 
bulabula) if not 
conducted 
properly. 
Environmental 
Because juveniles of the native 
and invasive Iguana species are 
similar in appearance, there is 
potential for inadvertent removal 
of native Iguanas during the 
eradication process  
I = 2;  P = 1 (Low) 
All personnel involved in eradication are 
properly trained in identification and 
distinction of the two species (there are 
differences in morphology and 
behavior). The project will also support 
awareness campaigns to increase public 
understanding of the differences 
between the native and invasive iguana 
and the risks posed by the invasive. A 
risk assessment of the eradication plan 
developed by the project will be 
conducted, and corresponding 
management and mitigation measures 
incorporated into the eradication plan. 
BAF 
Inability to fully 
predict all 
aspects of 
species 
invasiveness 
and 
establishment is 
a challenge 
Technical 
Because the ability to anticipate 
IAS entry and establishment to 
the country is unpredictable, its 
management and control 
requires adequate preparedness 
and resources to respond to any 
eventuality 
I =3; P =3 (Moderate) 
The development of an Early Detection 
and Rapid Response (EDRR) plan, initially 
as a trial in Viti Levu, will include: (1) a 
database of baseline information on IAS 
already established on Viti Levu and their 
distributions, (2) an EDRR plan for Viti 
Levu that assigns roles and 
responsibilities of all EDRR partners, (3) a 
protocol for how rapid-response actions 
will be implemented, (4) a central hotline 
that the public can use to report 
suspicious new plants and animals, (5) a 
regime of regular monitoring surveys at 
likely introduction sites for IAS (e.g., 
ports, nurseries) to discover new 
incursions, (6) an outreach strategy to 
inform residents and institutional 
stakeholders of the need for vigilance 
and rapid reporting of new pests, (7) a 
training program for rapid responders, 
and (8) a dedicated rapid-response fund 
to pay for program activities. Once 
BAF and partners 

54 | 
P a g e
 
 
trialed in Viti Levu, it would be expanded 
nationally based on the initial learning. 
Climate change 
may alter the 
threats and risks 
associated with 
IAS 
Environmental 
While, this is very unlikely, 
climate change may raise the 
threat of IAS by increasing the 
frequency/severity of fires, 
floods, and other natural events 
and thereby decreasing 
ecosystem resilience and creating 
conditions where invasive species 
can more easily become 
established. The exact ways and 
timeframes over which climate 
change impacts will emerge are 
largely unknown, however they 
are expected to increase over 
time, most likely affecting 
localized expansion of suitable 
IAS range and species 
introductions in the short to 
medium-term. 
I = 3; P=3 (Moderate) 
Climate change may raise the threat of 
IAS by increasing the frequency/severity 
of fires, floods, etc. and thereby 
decreasing ecosystem resilience and 
creating conditions where invasive 
species can more easily become 
established. Climatic parameters will be 
included in the IAS risk analysis activities 
to be undertaken in the project as well 
as in the National Invasive Species 
Framework and Strategic Action Plan 
(NISFSAP). 
MOE and BAF 
 
iii.
 
Social and environmental safeguards:  
 
The UNDP Environmental and social safeguard requirements have been followed in the development of 
the GEF-financed project. In accordance with the UNDP Social and Environmental Screening Procedure, 
the project is categorized as medium risk and is not expected to have significant negative environmental 
or  social  impacts  that  cannot  be  effectively  managed  through  simple  risk  management  actions.  The 
potential impacts or grievances, if any, would be reported to the GEF in the annual PIR. Annex 14 (Social 
and Environmental Screening Report) provides more details. 
 
iv.
 
Sustainability and Scaling Up:  
 
a) Innovative aspects: 
 
Fiji’s move from an agricultural-based quarantine program to a more holistic biosecurity approach is an 
innovative and modern approach to managing IAS that is rarely seen in the developing world. Further, this 
biosecurity program was initially developed largely to address international travel and goods, but it is now 
being  extended  to  inter-island  transport  as well, which  is  also  practiced  in  a  few  countries.  The  EDRR 
system to be developed and tested at Viti Levu through this investment is a new approach for Fiji, but is 
critical for any comprehensive biosecurity program. It too is innovative, and would set Fiji apart as a leader 
in  biosecurity  protection.  The  creation  of  a  national  multi-stakeholder  and  multi-sector  coordination 
mechanism for biosecurity activities will ensure that resources and countrywide capacity are being used 
as effectively as possible. Its successful implementation will also put Fiji on the cutting edge of biosecurity 
management.  
 
More  importantly,  the  proposed  GII  eradication  activities  represent  a  pioneering  effort  to  remove  an 

55 | 
P a g e
 
 
invasive reptilian species before it becomes hopelessly invasive and damaging. The Government of Fiji has 
decided  that  they  must  act  urgently  to  eradicate  the  GII.  This  is  a  very  forward-looking  strategy  for  a 
developing  nation  to  take  and  bespeaks  the  commitment  of  the  Fijian  Government  to  improving  the 
nation’s biosecurity. If successful, this would perhaps be the first reptile eradication effort in the world, 
and that precedent would provide good lessons for other countries interested in proactively dealing with 
reptilian IAS invasions.  
 
b) Financial and Institutional Sustainability:  
 
The Government of Fiji is fully committed to protecting the country from the introduction of IAS, as is 
made clear through the establishment of a separate statutory agency for biosecurity. Placement of BAF 
under  the  Ministry  of  Economy,  Public  Enterprises,  Public  Services  and  Communication  promotes 
institutional sustainability for biosecurity activities because this ministry has a well-established revenue 
collection (i.e. cost-recovery) mechanism to improve and expand overall biosecurity in the country. The 
annual revenue generated by BAF is currently around USD 4 million, and this is likely to grow further as 
BAF’s  outreach  expands.  These  revenues  are  used  to  improve  biosecurity  detection,  surveillance  and 
monitoring  systems  within  the  country.  The  broadening  of  the  current  cost-recovery  system  will  be 
supported by this project, for example through the development of IAS regulations that provide for fees 
and fines for biosecurity-related activities and ensure that these monies are entered into suitable financial 
mechanisms (e.g. revolving fund) that in turn can be used to finance improved/strengthened/broadened 
IAS management activities (Output 1.2).  
 
The government commitment is further demonstrated by the fact that BAF has over 200 front-line officers 
with facilities at all international ports (sea and air) and on-going services at all major domestic seaports. 
What is more, they have initiated efforts to respond to GII and other invaders within the country and have 
modern supportive legislation in the form of the 2008 Biosecurity  Promulgation. The government also 
provides significant resources and manpower to BAF’s partner agencies to support BAF in dealing with 
biosecurity issues in the country.  
 
Irrespective  of  GEF  funding,  one  can  expect  that  government  financial  support  will  continue  into  the 
future. BAF and its partners are committed to increase staff and resources for GII eradication in the four-
island site, expand biosecurity  activities to  include  inter-island transport,  upgrade  and expand existing 
scanning and incineration facilities at international and domestic airports and seaports, improve detection 
and  surveillance  measures,  and  improve  risk  management  and  information  exchange  as  a  long-term 
commitment  from  the  government.  The  intent  of  the  GEF  increment  is  to  complement  existing 
government activities by helping build the capacity of existing public institutions (particularly that of BAF 
and its partner agencies such as AFL and FRCA and the local communities) to work in integrated ways to 
reduce the threat of IAS. The project will further strengthen existing alliances, and build new ones, for IAS 
exclusion,  control  and  management  and  consequently  the  conservation  of  Fiji’s  rich  biodiversity.  This, 
along  with  the  broadening  of  cost-recovery  and  a  greater  sense  of  stakeholder  responsibility  for 
biosecurity facilitated by this project will help guarantee the institutional and financial sustainability of 
biosecurity activities in the country. 

56 | 
P a g e
 
 
  
To facilitate long-term sustainability of the existing biosecurity activities in the country, the project would 
ensure the following: 

 
Carefully tailored training and capacity building to expand the skills of the biosecurity staff, within 
and outside BAF. 

 
New technologies and tools are introduced for detection, surveillance and eradication of IAS. 

 
New  and  strengthened  collaborations  for  comprehensive  IAS  management  and  control  are 
developed  in  the  country,  through  establishment  of  a  national  coordinating  body  for  IAS, 
reconstitution  of  FIST,  preparation  of  NISFSAP,  risk  assessment  and  data  management  and 
sharing.  

 
Outreach  and  awareness  developed  to  build  local  community  and  stakeholder  support  for 
biosecurity and IAS eradication.  

 
Improved cost-recovery system and financial mechanisms to cover biosecurity activities in Fiji. 

 
Multiple  project  activities  will  be  based  on  and  disseminate  the  core  message  of  “IAS  and 
biosecurity is everyone’s responsibility”. 
 
c. Potential for scale-up:  
 
The EDRR system developed and tested at Viti Levu through this investment will be replicated elsewhere 
in Fiji until it becomes national in scope. BAF will integrate the lessons learned from demonstrating the 
EDRR system and IAS management  in islands into its information  management systems and share the 
results nationally to promote replication at other sites during and after the project. In addition, the project 
will  address  measures  to  reduce  or  eliminate  risky  practices  in  key  pathway  sectors  and  will  develop 
practical  experience  for  IAS  management  by  implementing  strategic  programs  at  selected  sites 
encompassing  high-priority  ecosystems  such  as  Taveuni.  These  will  enable  the  Government  of  Fiji  to 
determine cost-effective IAS management practices in the long-term and provide models for replication.  
 
Capacity building at BAF, the development of the NISFSAP, and the expansion of BAF’s multi-year strategy 
and outreach program will strongly support further up-scaling throughout Fiji. The involvement of NGOs, 
private enterprises and local communities is also expected to lead to further support and commitment to 
up-scaling  of  the  project’s  actions  and  successes.  Improvement  in  capacity,  awareness  and  regulatory 
frameworks will ensure post-project sustainability and encourage investments from public and private 
sector in biosecurity control and management, also contributing to up-scaling. 
 
In summary, it can be clearly stated that the viability of long-term sustainability and replicability of these 
approaches  is  assured  given  existing  and  planned  level  of  Government  commitment,  programs  and 
resources available for biosecurity in the country.  The project also focuses on supporting BAF’s current 
business model on biosecurity which allows for channeling revenues to other islands in the country that 
were not part of the initial biosecurity focus and management of BAF.  
 
v.
 
Economic and/or financial analysis: Not Applicable

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
57 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə