United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə7/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   17

VI.
 
P
ROJECT 
R
ESULTS 
F
RAMEWORK
 
  
 
This project will contribute to the following Sustainable Development Goal (s): Goal 15 – Life on Land and 
Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 
 
This project will contribute to the following country outcome included in the UNDAF/Country Program Document: UNDAF for the Pacific Sub-region 2013-2017  
Outcome Area 1: Environmental management, climate change and disaster risk management 
 
 
UNDAF  Outcome  1.1:  Improved  Resilience  of  PICTs,  with  a  particular  focus  on  communities,  through  integrated  implementation  of  sustainable  environmental  management,  climate  change 
adaptation/mitigation, and disaster risk management 
This project will be linked to the following output of the UNDP Strategic Plan: Output 2.5. Legal and regulatory frameworks, policies and institutions enabled to ensure the conservation, 
sustainable use, access and benefit sharing of natural resources, biodiversity and ecosystems, in line with international conventions and national legislation 
 
 
 
Objective and Outcome Indicators 
Baseline  
Mid-term Target 
End of Project Target 
Risks and Assumptions 
Project Objective 
To improve the chances of the 
long-term survival of terrestrial 
endemic and threatened species 
on Taveuni Island, surrounding 
islets and throughout Fiji by 
building national and local 
capacity to manage Invasive 
Alien Species 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0.1: Extent to which legal or policy or 
institutional frameworks are in place for 
conservation, sustainable use, and access and 
benefit sharing of natural resources, biodiversity 
and ecosystems. (UNDP mandatory indicator: 
IRRF Output 2.5 indicator 2.5.1) 
NISFSAP under 
development 
Long-term 
strategy for BAF 
non-existent 
Specific, targeted 
IAS legislation 
non-existent 
NISFSAP completed 
through collaborative, 
multi-agency process 
BAF long-term strategy 
completed 
Legislative framework 
related to IAS reviewed 
and needed legislative 
revisions identified and 
drafted 
NISFSAP endorsed by 
national IAS Committee 
with committed 
resources for 
implementation 
BAF long-term strategy 
adopted and under 
implementation 
Specific legislation and 
regulations for IAS 
adopted and in place 
Assumptions 
- Relevant agencies are willing to 
cooperate fully 
- Cabinet support for adopting 
legislative reforms required 
0.2: Number of direct project beneficiaries 
(UNDP mandatory indicator) 
 

At least 170 BAF and 
other relevant 
government staff 
engaged in training and 
awareness activities 
(40% of which are 
women) 
At least 500 local people 
in four islands area are 
At least 270
3
 BAF and 
other relevant 
government staff 
engaged in training and 
awareness activities 
(40% of which are 
women) 
At least 800
4
 
local 
people in four islands 
Assumptions 
- Continuing level of political will to 
support the project interventions 
-Local communities, tour 
operators, resort owners, 
importers and shipping agents 
recognize the benefits of IAS 
prevention and control 
                                                                 
3
 Includes 200 national BAF and partner agency staff, 20 BAF and partner staff in Taveuni and three islets and 50 staff trained specifically for the eradication work in Outcome 3. 
4
 
Includes (i) 50 local villages directly hired for eradication work, (ii) estimated 600 community members actively engaged in volunteering searching for GII and hence benefit from their eradication, (iii) and estimated 150 

58 | 
P a g e
 
 
engaged in project 
activities (40% of which 
are women) 
area are engaged in 
project activities (40% 
of which are women) 
0.3: Comprehensiveness of national level IAS 
management framework and ability to prevent 
IAS of high risk to biodiversity from entering Fiji, 
as measured by IAS Tracking Tool 
IAS Tracking Tool 
Score of 4 (out of 
total of 27) due 
to lack of 
national 
coordinating 
mechanism; no 
IAS strategy; 
detection 
surveys non-
existent; priority 
pathways not 
actively 
managed, etc 
An increase score of at 
least 8 in IAS Tracking 
Tool with established 
national coordination 
mechanism, IAS strategy 
exists, priority pathways 
identified, detection 
survey methods agreed, 
and criteria for 
prioritization of species 
and infestations defined 
An increase score of at 
least to 12 in IAS 
Tracking Tool with 
national coordinating 
mechanism overseeing 
IAS actions codified by 
law; IAS strategy under 
implementation: 
regulations in place to 
implement National IAS 
strategy; priority 
pathways actively 
managed; detection 
surveys conducted 
regularly, etc 
Risks: 
-Relevant agencies may not be 
willing to cooperate fully 
Assumptions: 
-Willingness within the GoF to 
commit funding/resources to the 
management of IAS that impact 
biodiversity 
-Improved BAF revenue generation 
-National and international 
macroeconomic conditions remain 
stable. 
0.4: Level of government funding and revenues 
for biosecurity in Fiji 
USD 4.5 
million/year in 
GOF budget 
allocation and 
USD 4.0 
million/year in 
revenues 
At least 10% increase to 
USD 4.95 million/year in 
GOF budget allocation 
and USD 4.4 
million/year in revenues 
At least 20% increase to 
USD 5.4 million/year in 
GOF budget allocation 
and USD 4.8 
million/year in revenues 
Outcome 1 
Strengthened IAS policy, 
institutions and coordination at 
the national level to reduce the 
risk of IAS entering Fiji 
1.1: National and local capacity in detection, 
prevention and control of entry of high risk IAS, 
as measured by UNDP Capacity Development 
Scorecard  
UNDP Capacity 
Development 
Score of 14 for 
BAF 
UNDP Capacity 
Development Score of 
at least 17 for BAF 
UNDP Capacity 
Development Score of 
at least 21 for BAF 
Risks 
-Some agencies and/or sectors may 
have difficulty coordinating with 
other agencies and/or sectors  
Assumption 
- Sufficient political interest for 
action on IAS 
-Willingness of institutions to share 
responsibilities  
1.2: Operational status of national level, multi-
agency, multi-sector coordinating group for IAS 
activities, including biosecurity and management  
Non-existent 
TOR for multi-agency, 
multi-sectorial 
coordinating group 
agreed, and group 
established and first 
meeting conducted 
Multi-agency, multi-
sectorial coordinating 
group established, 
codified by national 
legislation, and 
functioning effectively 
1.3: Extent of biosecurity capacity for 
comprehensive prevention, early detection and 
rapid response (EDRR) 
Risk assessment 
undertaken, but 
not 
comprehensive 
and do not have 
full coverage and 
Risks assessment 
conducted for 60% of all 
organisms for import 
and documentation 
system developed and 
used 
100% risk assessments 
for all organisms for 
import and 
systematically 
documented 
 
Risks 
-Sufficient trained and committed 
personnel unavailable to provide 
adequate coverage 
 
                                                                 
tour operators, resort owners, importers, tourists and shipping agents directly participating in IAS prevention and control.  

59 | 
P a g e
 
 
data records 
scattered in 
notebooks or 
non-existent 
Some elements 
for early 
detection and 
rapid response 
exist but no 
comprehensive 
system available 
currently 
 
 
 
 
Draft EDRR plan 
developed and clear 
concept developed for 
public reporting system. 
Field staff to implement 
EDDR in place and 
training initiated 
 
 
 
 
Established EDRR 
capacity on Viti Levu 
serving as a national 
pilot and resources to 
support EDRR in place 
-Insufficient rapid-response 
resources and funding available to 
support EDRR activities 
-Differences between daily 
operations and rapid-response 
actions are not fully recognized 
and/or supported  
Assumptions 
-Additional revenues can be 
developed to support inspection 
and quarantine services 
throughout the country 
-Adequate laws and regulations are 
in place to support improved 
inspection and quarantine services 
national wide 
-Legislation/regulations are in place 
to support EDRR actions and funding 
- Local actors understand the role of 
IAS management in reducing social 
vulnerability 
-Buy-in at all levels of society, 
including timely reporting of novel 
species encounters 
Outcome 2 
Enhanced IAS prevention, 
surveillance and control 
operations to prevent new 
introductions on Taveuni, 
Qamea, Laucala and Matagi 
2.1: Number of new establishments of IAS 
species on Taveuni and islets, covering species 
listed in the Fiji black list and well as any high-
risk IAS present in Fiji but not Taveuni 
Baseline to be 
established in 
Year 1 as part of 
Output 1.3 
(national black 
and white lists) 
and Output 2.1 
(four-island 
specific black 
and white lists) 
National black and 
white lists and four-
island specific black and 
white lists of species 
established 
No new establishments 
from baseline 
No new establishments 
from baseline 
Risks 
-Means of ensuring public access 
to the data are uncertain 
Assumptions 
-Baseline surveys of IAS can be 
rapidly completed 

60 | 
P a g e
 
 
2.2: Capacity and engagement of biosecurity 
personnel and partners for inspection, control 
and management to prevent entry and inter-
island IAS spread  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Currently limited 
to 2 weeks 
general training 
Low level of 
biosecurity 
inspection of 
goods, persons 
and vectors 
arriving at 
islands  
 
Standardized systems 
and processes 
developed and in place 
for inspection of good, 
persons and vectors 
arriving at islands, 
required new staff for 
increased inspection 
and biosecurity are in 
place  
Comprehensive training 
program developed and 
80% of existing frontline 
staff trained and 
undertaking random 
inspections of 
passengers and goods at 
airports and cargo ports 
100% of frontline staff 
(around 20 biosecurity, 
police, customs staff 
etc, of which 40% are 
women) trained and 
undertaking random 
inspections of 
passengers and goods at 
airports and cargo ports  
At least 50% of goods, 
persons and vectors 
(transport vehicles) 
arriving at islands are 
subject to biosecurity 
inspections 
 
Risks 
-Taxonomic expertise for some IAS 
groups may not be readily available 
-Market-driven changes to 
pathways and vectors cannot be 
fully anticipated 
-Establishment of new high-risk IAS 
within trade-partner countries 
cannot be fully anticipated 
-The invasiveness of many species 
is simply unknown, making it 
difficult to determine exactly which 
species training should focus on 
Assumptions 
-Adequate regulations to support 
improved inspection services 
-Community support  
Outcome 3 
Long-term measures for 
protection of terrestrial 
ecosystems and their 
biodiversity on Taveuni, Qamea, 
Laucala and Matagi 
3.1: Status of GIIs seen/captured on Taveuni  
 
No search efforts 
for GII on 
Taveuni  
Initial surveys 
completed in all 
potential GII sites on 
Taveuni 
If surveys indicate GII 
are present, search and 
eradication efforts 
indicate a decline in 
sighting/capture of GII 
No GIIs seen/captured 
on Taveuni during last 
year of project 
Risks 
- Inter-agency cooperation may be 
stifled by territorial rivalries 
-Global expertise to formulate an 
effective plan is limited  
Assumption 
- Interest and commitment of all 
relevant organizations  
3.2: GII numbers on Qamea, Matagi and Laucala, 
as indicated by rates of removal 
 
Baseline GII 
population size 
to be established 
in Year 1 based 
on eradication 
removal rates 
Capture operations 
vigorously and 
systematically 
conducted to reach 
100% coverage of the 
islands  
Rates of removal 
indicate a decline in GII 
numbers on Qamea, 
Matagi and Laucala  
Reduction in GII 
numbers on Qamea, 
Matagi and Laucala by 
50% or more  
Risks 
-Not all animals can be put at risk 
of being killed 
-Animals are difficult to detect 
-Lethal methods are limited and 
require further development 
-Agency and staff interest may 
wane with time 
-Lack of understanding of the need 
for long-term commitment to 
ensure success in eradication 
Assumptions 
-Resources and commitment will 
be available beyond the duration 
of the project 
3.3:  Status  and  trends  in  native  banded  iguana 
populations  (Brachylophus  bulabula)  in  areas 
occupied by GII 
Baseline to be 
established in 
Year 1 
Stable populations of 
native banded iguana 
(Brachylophus bulabula
in areas occupied by GII 
on island(s) and 
eradication efforts 
ongoing 
Stable or improved 
populations of native 
banded iguana 
(Brachylophus bulabula
in areas previously 
(prior to eradication) 
occupied by GII on 
island(s)  

61 | 
P a g e
 
 
3.4:  Community  perceptions  of  damage  to  food 
crops  and  livelihoods  in  areas  occupied  by  GII, 
disaggregated by gender  
Impacts not yet 
visible or 
reported 
Limited 
awareness of 
potential impact 
of GII 
No standardized 
assessment or 
understanding of 
community 
perceptions and 
awareness of 
damage or 
impacts from GII 
Standardized 
baseline will be 
established in 
Year 1 
Baselines established of 
community perceptions 
and awareness of GII 
impacts and monitoring 
protocols for evaluating 
changes in community 
perceptions designed 
and being monitored 
At least 30% of sampled 
local population (40% of 
which are women), 
aware of potential 
adverse impacts of GII 
and need for biosecurity 
No/reduced community 
perceptions of damage 
to food crops and 
livelihoods in areas 
occupied by GII (prior to 
eradication) 
At least 50% of sampled 
local population (40% of 
which are women), 
aware of potential 
adverse impacts of GII 
and need for biosecurity 
-Improved detection and removal 
methods can be developed 
-The GIIs have not already spread 
too far to eradicate  
-Adequate capacity for monitoring 
native biodiversity exists 
-That damage from GII on food 
crops and livelihoods likely not 
occurred and use of perception 
study to validate it appropriate 
Outcome 4 
Increased awareness of risks 
posed by IAS and need for 
biosecurity of local 
communities, travelling public, 
tour operators and shipping 
agents 
 
4.1: Level of awareness of IAS and biosecurity 
among tour operators, resort owners, importers, 
tourists and shipping agents  
 
Coordinated 
outreach on 
biosecurity 
lacking 
Limited 
awareness of 
impact of IAS 
among public 
Baseline survey 
established in 
Year 1 
At least 20% of sampled 
tour operators, resort 
owners, importers, 
tourists and shipping 
agents aware of 
potential adverse 
impacts of IAS and need 
for biosecurity 
At least 50% of sampled 
tour operators, resort 
owners, importers, 
tourists and shipping 
agents aware of 
potential adverse 
impacts of IAS and need 
for biosecurity 
Risks 
-Actions among the assorted 
agencies and NGOs remain 
uncoordinated 
Assumptions 
-Community diversity will not be a 
hindrance to outreach activities 
4.2: Operational status of on-line clearinghouse 
for IAS information to collate and make 
accessible IAS information to stakeholders 
Partial existence 
of on-line 
clearinghouse for 
IAS information 
at Department of 
Environment 
Enhancement of on-line 
clearinghouse fully 
scoped and 
improvements in 
progress 
On-line clearinghouse 
completed and actively 
used by relevant 
agencies 
Risks 
-Lack of resources, information and 
personnel to move project forward 
-Difficult to obtain IAS information 
Assumptions 
-Required information is readily 
available 
-Partnerships can be established 
that facilitate the sharing of 
existing information 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
62 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
VII.
 
M
ONITORING AND 
E
VALUATION 
(M&E)
 
P
LAN
 
The project results as outlined in the project results framework will be monitored annually and evaluated 
periodically during project implementation to ensure the project effectively achieves these results.  
 
Project-level monitoring and evaluation will be  undertaken in compliance with  UNDP  requirements  as 
outlined in the 
UNDP POPP 
and 
UNDP Evaluation Policy
. While these UNDP requirements are not outlined 
in this project document, the UNDP Country Office will work with the relevant project stakeholders to 
ensure UNDP M&E requirements are met in a timely fashion and to high quality standards. Additional 
mandatory GEF-specific M&E requirements (as outlined below) will be undertaken in accordance with the 
GEF M&E policy
 and other relevant GEF policies.  
 
In  addition  to  these  mandatory  UNDP  and  GEF  M&E  requirements,  other  M&E  activities  deemed 
necessary  to  support  project-level  adaptive  management  will  be  agreed  during  the  Project  Inception 
Workshop and will be detailed in the Inception Report. This will include the exact role of project target 
groups and other stakeholders in project M&E activities including the GEF Operational Focal Point and 
national/regional institutes assigned to undertake project monitoring. The GEF Operational Focal Point 
will strive to ensure consistency in the approach taken to the GEF-specific M&E requirements (notably the 
GEF Tracking Tools) across all GEF-financed projects in the country. This could be achieved for example by 
using  one  national  institute  to  complete  the  GEF  Tracking  Tools  for  all  GEF-financed  projects  in  the 
country, including projects supported by other GEF Agencies.   
 
M&E Oversight and monitoring responsibilities: 
Project  Coordinator:  The  Project  Coordinator  is  responsible  for  day-to-day  project  management  and 
regular  monitoring  of  project  results  and  risks,  including  social  and  environmental  risks.  The  Project 
Coordinator  will  ensure  that  all  project  staff  maintain  a  high  level  of  transparency,  responsibility  and 
accountability in M&E and reporting of project results. The Project Coordinator will inform the Project 
Board, the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP-GEF RTA of any delays or difficulties as they arise during 
implementation so that appropriate support and corrective measures can be adopted.  
 
The Project Coordinator will develop annual work plans based on the multi-year work plan included in 
Annex  10,  including annual output  targets  to support  the efficient  implementation of the project. The 
Project Coordinator will ensure that the standard UNDP and GEF M&E requirements are fulfilled to the 
highest  quality.  This  includes,  but  is  not  limited  to,  ensuring  the  results  framework  indicators  are 
monitored annually in time for evidence-based reporting in the GEF PIR, and that the monitoring of risks 
and the various plans/strategies developed to support project implementation (e.g. gender strategy, KM 
strategy etc.) occur on a regular basis.  
 
Project Board: The Project Board will take corrective action as needed to ensure the project achieves the 
desired results. The Project Board will hold project reviews to assess the performance of the project and 
appraise the Annual Work Plan for the following year. In the project’s final year, the Project Board will 
hold an end-of-project review to capture lessons learned and discuss opportunities for scaling up and to 
highlight project results and lessons learned with relevant audiences. This final review meeting will also 
discuss the findings outlined in the project terminal evaluation report and the management response. 
 

 
 
63 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Project Implementing Partner: The Implementing Partner is responsible for providing any and all required 
information  and  data  necessary  for  timely,  comprehensive  and  evidence-based  project  reporting, 
including results and financial data, as necessary and appropriate. The Implementing Partner will strive to 
ensure project-level M&E is undertaken by national institutes, and is aligned with national systems so that 
the data used by and generated by the project supports national systems.  
 
UNDP Country Office: The UNDP Country Office will support the Project Coordinator as needed, including 
through annual supervision missions.  The  annual supervision missions will take  place  according to the 
schedule outlined in the annual work plan. Supervision mission reports will be circulated to the project 
team  and  Project  Board  within  one  month  of  the  mission.  The  UNDP  Country  Office  will  initiate  and 
organize key GEF M&E activities including the annual GEF PIR, the independent mid-term review and the 
independent terminal evaluation. The UNDP Country Office will also ensure that the standard UNDP and 
GEF M&E requirements are fulfilled to the highest quality. 
 
 
The UNDP Country Office is responsible for complying with all UNDP project-level M&E requirements as 
outlined  in  the 
UNDP  POPP. 
This  includes  ensuring  the  UNDP  Quality  Assurance  Assessment  during 
implementation  is  undertaken  annually;  that  annual  targets  at  the  output  level  are  developed,  and 
monitored and reported using UNDP corporate systems; the regular updating of the ATLAS risk log; and, 
the updating of the UNDP gender marker on an annual basis based on gender mainstreaming progress 
reported in the GEF PIR and the UNDP ROAR. Any quality concerns flagged during these M&E activities 
(e.g. annual GEF PIR quality assessment ratings) must be addressed by the UNDP Country Office and the 
Project Coordinator. The UNDP Country Office will retain all M&E records for this project for up to seven 
years  after  project  financial  closure  in  order  to  support  ex-post  evaluations  undertaken  by  the  UNDP 
Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) and/or the GEF Independent Evaluation Office (IEO).  
 
UNDP-GEF Unit: Additional M&E and implementation quality assurance and troubleshooting support will 
be provided by the UNDP-GEF Regional Technical Advisor and the UNDP-GEF Directorate as needed.  
 
Audit: The project will be audited according to UNDP Financial Regulations and Rules and applicable audit 
policies on NIM implemented projects.
5
 
 
Additional GEF monitoring and reporting requirements: 
Inception Workshop and Report: A project inception workshop will be held within three months after the 
project document has been signed by all relevant parties to, among others:  
a) Re-orient project stakeholders to the project strategy and discuss any changes in the overall context 
that influence project implementation;  
b) Discuss the roles and responsibilities of the project team, including reporting and communication lines 
and conflict resolution mechanisms;  
c) Review the results framework and finalize the indicators, means of verification and monitoring plan;  
d) Discuss reporting, monitoring and evaluation roles and responsibilities and finalize the M&E budget; 
identify national/regional institutes to be involved in project-level M&E; discuss the role of the GEF OFP 
in M&E; 
e) Update and review responsibilities for monitoring the various project plans and strategies, including 
the risk log; Environmental and Social Management Plan and other safeguard requirements; the gender 
strategy; the knowledge management strategy, and other relevant strategies;  
                                                                 
5
 See guidance here: 
https://info.undp.org/global/popp/frm/pages/financial-management-and-execution-modalities.aspx
 
 

 
 
64 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
f) Review financial reporting procedures and mandatory requirements, and agree on the arrangements 
for the annual audit; and 
g) Plan and schedule Project Board meetings and finalize the first year annual work plan.  
The Project Coordinator will prepare the inception report no later than one month after the inception 
workshop. The inception report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP-GEF Regional 
Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board.  
 
GEF  Project  Implementation  Report  (PIR):  The  Project  Coordinator,  the  UNDP Country  Office,  and  the 
UNDP-GEF  Regional  Technical  Advisor  will  provide  objective  input  to  the  annual  GEF  PIR  covering  the 
reporting period July (previous year) to June (current year) for each year of project implementation. The 
Project Coordinator will ensure that the indicators included in the project results framework is reported 
annually  in  advance  of  the  PIR  submission  deadline  so  that  progress  can  be  reported  in  the  PIR.  Any 
environmental and social grievances, critical and related management plans will be monitored regularly, 
and progress will be reported in the PIR. The PIR submitted to the GEF will be shared with the Project 
Board. The UNDP Country Office will coordinate the input of the GEF Operational Focal Point and other 
stakeholders to the PIR as appropriate. The quality rating of the previous year’s PIR will be used to inform 
the preparation of the subsequent PIR.  
 
Lessons  learned  and  knowledge  generation:  Results  from  the  project  will  be  disseminated  within  and 
beyond  the  project  intervention  area  through  existing  information  sharing  networks  and  forums.  The 
project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate,  in scientific, policy-based and/or any 
other networks, which may be of benefit to the project. The project will identify, analyse and share lessons 
learned that might be beneficial to the design and implementation of similar projects and disseminate 
these  lessons  widely.  There  will  be  continuous  information  exchange  between  this  project  and  other 
projects of similar focus in the same country, region and globally. 
 
GEF  Focal  Area  Tracking  Tools:  The  following  GEF  Tracking  Tool(s)  will  be  used  to  monitor  global 
environmental benefit results: GEF IAS Tracking Tool. The baseline/CEO Endorsement GEF BD IAS Tracking 
Tool(s) – submitted with this project document – will be updated by the Project Coordinator/PIU Team 
and shared with the mid-term review consultants and terminal evaluation consultants before the required 
review/evaluation missions take place. The updated GEF Tracking Tool will be submitted to the GEF along 
with the completed Mid-term Review report and Terminal Evaluation report. 
 
Independent  Mid-term  Review  (MTR):  An  independent  mid-term  review  process  will  begin  after  the 
second PIR has been submitted to the GEF, and the MTR report will be submitted to the GEF in the same 
year  as  the  3
rd
  PIR.  The  MTR  findings  and  responses  outlined  in  the  management  response  will  be 
incorporated  as  recommendations  for  enhanced  implementation  during  the  final  half  of  the  project’s 
duration.  The  terms  of  reference,  the  review  process  and  the  MTR  report  will  follow  the  standard 
templates  and  guidance  prepared  by  the  UNDP  IEO  for  GEF-financed  projects  available  on  the 
UNDP 
Evaluation Resource Center (ERC).
 As noted in this guidance, the evaluation will be ‘independent, impartial 
and rigorous’. The consultants that will be hired to undertake the assignment will be independent from 
organizations that were involved in designing, executing or advising on the project to be evaluated. The 
GEF Operational Focal Point and other stakeholders will be involved and consulted during the terminal 
evaluation process. Additional quality assurance support is available from the UNDP-GEF Directorate. The 
final MTR report will be available in English and will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP-
GEF Regional Technical Adviser, and approved by the Project Board.  
 

 
 
65 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Terminal Evaluation (TE): An independent terminal evaluation (TE) will take place upon completion of all 
major  project  outputs  and  activities.  The  terminal  evaluation  process  will  begin  three  months  before 
operational closure of the project allowing the evaluation mission to proceed while the project team is 
still  in  place,  yet  ensuring the  project  is close  enough  to  completion  for  the  evaluation team  to  reach 
conclusions on key aspects such as project sustainability. The Project Coordinator will remain on contract 
until the TE report and management response have been finalized. The terms of reference, the evaluation 
process and the final TE report will follow the standard templates and guidance prepared by the UNDP 
IEO  for  GEF-financed  projects  available  on  the 
UNDP  Evaluation  Resource  Center.
  As  noted  in  this 
guidance, the evaluation will be ‘independent, impartial and rigorous’. The consultants that will be hired 
to  undertake the  assignment  will  be  independent  from  organizations  that  were  involved  in  designing, 
executing  or  advising  on  the  project  to  be  evaluated.  The  GEF  Operational  Focal  Point  and  other 
stakeholders  will be  involved and consulted during the terminal evaluation process.  Additional quality 
assurance support is available from the UNDP-GEF Directorate. The final TE report will be cleared by the 
UNDP Country Office and the UNDP-GEF Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project 
Board. The TE report will be publically available in English on the UNDP ERC.  
 
The UNDP Country Office will include the planned project terminal evaluation in the UNDP Country Office 
evaluation  plan,  and  will  upload  the  final  terminal  evaluation  report  in  English and  the  corresponding 
management response to the UNDP Evaluation Resource Centre (ERC). Once uploaded to the ERC, the 
UNDP IEO will undertake a quality assessment and validate the findings and ratings in the TE report, and 
rate the quality of the TE report. The UNDP IEO assessment report will be sent to the GEF IEO along with 
the project terminal evaluation report. 
 
Final Report: The project’s terminal PIR along with the terminal evaluation (TE) report and corresponding 
management response will serve as the final project report package. The final project report package shall 
be discussed with the Project Board during an end-of-project review meeting to discuss lesson learned 
and opportunities for scaling up.   
 
Table 4: Mandatory GEF M&E Requirements and M&E Budget:  
 
                                                                 
6
 Excluding project team staff time and UNDP staff time and travel expenses. 
GEF M&E requirements 
 
Primary 
responsibility 
Indicative costs to be 
charged to the Project 
Budget
6
 (US$) 
Time frame 
GEF grant 
Co-
financing 
Inception Workshop  
UNDP Country Office  
5,000 
5,000 
Within three 
months of project 
document signature  
Inception Report 
Project Coordinator 
3,000 
 
Within two weeks 
of inception 
workshop 
Standard UNDP monitoring and 
reporting requirements as outlined in 
the UNDP POPP 
UNDP Country Office 
 
None 
5,000 
Quarterly, annually 
Monitoring of indicators in project 
results framework (refer Annexes 9 and 
10) 
Project Coordinator and 
Chief Technical 
25,000 
(Outputs 3.4, 
3.5) 
10,000 
Inception, mid-term 
and end of project 

 
 
66 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VIII.
 
G
OVERNANCE AND 
M
ANAGEMENT 
A
RRANGEMENTS 
 
 
Roles  and  responsibilities  of  the  project’s  governance  mechanism:  The  project  will  be  implemented 
following  UNDP’s  national  implementation  modality,  according  to  the  Standard  Basic  Assistance 
Agreement between UNDP and the Government of Fiji, and the Country Program.  
 
                                                                 
7
 The costs of UNDP Country Office and UNDP-GEF Unit’s participation and time are charged to the GEF Agency Fee. 
Specialist, Specialist 
Contractors 
GEF Project Implementation Report 
(PIR)  
Project Coordinator and 
UNDP Country Office 
and UNDP-GEF RTA 
None 
5,000 
Annually  
NIM Audit as per UNDP audit policies 
UNDP Country Office 
15,000 
 
Annually or other 
frequency as per 
UNDP Audit policies 
Lessons learned and knowledge 
generation 
Project Coordinator 
3,000 
 
Annually 
Monitoring of environmental and social 
risks, and corresponding management 
plans as relevant 
Project Coordinator 
UNDP Country Office 
None 
 
Ongoing 
Addressing environmental and social 
grievances 
Project Coordinator 
UNDP Country Office 
BPPS as needed 
None  
5,000 
 
Project Board meetings 
Project Board 
UNDP Country Office 
Project Coordinator 
2,500 
10,000 
At minimum 
annually 
Supervision missions 
UNDP Country Office 
None
7
 
 
Annually 
Oversight missions 
UNDP-GEF team 
None
7
 
 
Troubleshooting as 
needed 
Knowledge management as outlined in 
Outcome 4 
Project Coordinator 
50,000 
50,000 
Ongoing 
GEF Secretariat learning missions/site 
visits  
UNDP Country Office 
and Project Coordinator 
and UNDP-GEF team 
None 
 
To be determined. 
Mid-term GEF IAS Tracking Tool to be 
updated by PIU (refer Annex 13 for 
baseline TT) 
Project Coordinator and 
Chief Technical 
Specialist 
None  
 
Before mid-term 
review mission 
takes place. 
Independent Mid-term Review (MTR) 
and management response  
UNDP Country Office 
and Project team and 
UNDP-GEF team 
30,000  
 
Between 2
nd
 and 3
rd
 
PIR.  
Terminal GEF IAS Tracking Tool to be 
updated by PIU 
Project Coordinator and 
Chief Technical 
Specialist 
None  
 
Before terminal 
evaluation mission 
takes place 
Independent Terminal Evaluation (TE) 
included in UNDP evaluation plan, and 
management response 
UNDP Country Office 
and Project team and 
UNDP-GEF team 
35,000  
 
At least three 
months before 
operational closure 
TOTAL indicative COST  
 
USD 168,500 
USD 90,000 
 

 
 
67 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
The  Implementing Partner  for this project  is  the  Biosecurity Authority of Fiji  (BAF).  The  Implementing 
Partner is responsible and accountable for managing this project, including the monitoring and evaluation 
of project interventions, achieving project outcomes, and for the effective use of UNDP resources.  
 
 
Project Board 
A Project Board will be established under BAF and Chaired by the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to the 
Biosecurity Act 2008 and will include representatives of UNDP and Ministry of Local Government, Housing 
and Environment. It would serve as the national governing body for the project. The Board will meet twice 
in a year and provide strategic direction for implementation of the project, approve annual work-plans 
and  provide  a  coordination  forum  between  key  stakeholders.  The  committee  will  be  responsible  for 
making,  by  consensus,  management  decisions  when  guidance  is  required  by  the  Project  Coordinator, 
including recommendation for Implementing Partner and UNDP approval of project plans and revisions. 
The PIU will serve as secretary of the Project Board. Other organizations may be added as necessary and 
agreed by the Project Board. Other participants can be invited into the Board meetings at the decision of 
the Board, as and when required to enhance its efficacy. In order to ensure UNDP’s ultimate accountability, 
decisions should be made in accordance with standards that shall ensure management for development 
results, best value money, fairness, integrity, transparency and effective international competition.  
Specific responsibilities of the Project Board would include the following: 
Project Implementation Unit 
 
Project Coordinator 
Project Admin/Financial Officer 
Chief Technical Specialist 
 
 
Project Board 
Senior Beneficiary:  
Ministry of Local 
Government, Housing, 
Environment, Infrastructure 
and Transport  
 Executive:  
Biosecurity Authority of Fiji 
(Ministry of Economy, Public 
Enterprises, Public Services and 
Communication)
 
Senior Supplier:  
UNDP 
 
Project Assurance 
UNDP Pacific Office in Fiji 
Project Support 
Fiji Invasive Species 
Taskforce (FIST) 
Project Organization Structure 
Four island IAS Taskforce 
 
BAF 
iTaukei Affairs, Agriculture, 
Fisheries, Forestry, Resort, NGO 
and Community 
representatives, etc. 
 

 
 
68 | 
P a g e
 
 
 

 
Provide strategic direction and guidance for implementation of the project 

 
Review project’s progress, review and evaluation reports and make and ensure for follow-up 
actions for timely and quality implementation 

 
Approve annual work-plans and budgets and any essential deviations (above 5% of budget 
reduction from one of the four components) from the original plans and budgets  

 
Provide coordination and conflict resolution forum for key stakeholders, e.g. concerned 
ministries, provincial line departments, and relevant research institutions  

 
Oversee and support the commitment and funding and other support for the project 

 
Oversee prudent and efficient use of project budgets and other resources 

 
Decide on conceptual and design changes and other recommendations of mid-term review 

 
Provide guidance on post-project sustainability, institutional and financial arrangements, 
keeping in view the recommendations of external reviews. 
 
The  project  assurance  role  will  be  the  responsibility  of  the  UNDP  Country  Office.  The  UNDP  Regional 
Technical Advisor will provide additional quality assurance, as and when needed. 
 
Agreement on intellectual property rights and use of logo on the project’s deliverables and disclosure of 
informationIn order to accord proper acknowledgement to the GEF for providing grant funding, the GEF 
logo will appear together with the UNDP logo on all promotional materials, other written materials like 
publications  developed  by  the  project,  and  project  hardware.  Any  citation  on  publications  regarding 
projects  funded  by  the  GEF  will  also  accord  proper  acknowledgement  to  the  GEF.  Information  will  be 
disclosed in accordance with relevant policies notably the UNDP Disclosure Policy
8
 and the GEF policy on 
public involvement
9
.  
 
PROJECT MANAGEMENT  
 
Project Implementation Unit 
The  Project  Implementation  Unit  (PIU)  will  be  established  in  BAF.  It  will  be  comprised  of  a  Project 
Coordinator (PC), Project Administrative/Finance Officer (PAO), and Chief Technical Specialist (CTS). The 
PIU,  in  collaboration  with  the  BAF  will  have  overall  management  and  administrative  responsibility  for 
facilitating  stakeholder  involvement  and  ensuring  increased  district  and  local  level  ownership  of  the 
project. The PIU staff will be located in BAF Office in Suva.  
 
Technical Advisory Committee 
The Fiji Invasive Species Taskforce (FIST) constituted by the National Environment Council (NEC) under the 
National Environment Management Act of 2005, and convened under the chairmanship of BAF will  be 
reconstituted to advise and facilitate the coordination of the project. FIST is comprised of representatives 
                                                                 
8
 See http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/operations/transparency/information_disclosurepolicy/ 
9
 See https://www.thegef.org/gef/policies_guidelines 

 
 
69 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
of BAF, Environment, Fisheries, Forests, Agriculture, FRCA, iTaukei Affairs, iTaukei Land Trust Board, NGOs 
and academic institutions. The key function of FIST will be to provide advice on IAS-related activities in 
the country, including that of the project. FIST would provide guidance and ensure consistency, synergy 
and convergence of approaches with the other ongoing development projects and processes in the state, 
and support annual work-plan development and implementation.  
Four Island IAS Taskforce (FIIT) 
This group will oversee and support BAF in the implementation of Outcome 2 (Improved IAS prevention 
and surveillance operations at the island level on Taveuni, Qamea, Matagi and Laucala) and Outcome 3 
(Eradication  of  Giant  Invasive  Iguana  from  Taveuni,  Qamea,  Matagi  and  Laucala)  of  the  project.  In 
particular, this working group will help coordinate efforts across the different agencies in the four islands 
for facilitating biosecurity monitoring and surveillance, facilitate outreach activities, coordinate local and 
cross-training activities, support preparation of eradication work plans, facilitate coordination with resort 
owners and tour operators, support efforts for coordination of resource mobilization and manpower for 
the  eradication  and  biosecurity  activities  and  ensure  local  input  for  all  stages  of  planning  and 
implementation for Outcome 2 and 3. The Task Force will be convened by BAF and include representatives 
from local communities,  divisional (or sub-divisional) of relevant  government  agencies such as  iTaukei 
Affairs,  Agriculture,  Education,  Environment,  Fisheries  and  Forestry,  Health,  Customs,  Police,  port 
authorities, Maritime Safety and may include representatives from other key civil society entities such as 
resort, tour operators, etc.   
 
Detailed Terms of Reference for Key Project Staff are provided in Annex 9. 
 
IX.
 
F
INANCIAL 
P
LANNING AND 
M
ANAGEMENT 
 
 
The total cost of the project is USD 30,367,482. This is financed through a GEF grant of USD 3,502,968, 
USD  101,096  in  kind  co-financing  from  UNDP  and  USD  26,763,418  in  parallel  co-financing  from 
Government of Fiji. UNDP, as the GEF Agency, is responsible for the execution of the GEF resources and 
the cash co-financing transferred to UNDP bank account only. 
 
 
Parallel co-financing: The actual realization of project co-financing will be monitored during the mid-term 
review and terminal evaluation process and will be reported to the GEF. The planned parallel co-financing 
will be used as follows: 
Co-financing 
source 
Co-financing 
type 
Co-financing 
amount 
Planned 
Activities/Outputs 
Risks 
Risk 
Mitigation 
Measures 
GEF 
Grant 
$3,502,968 
Components 1, 2, 3 and 4  N/A 
N/A 
UNDP 
In-kind 
$101,096 
Technical advice for 
Components 1, 2, 3 and 

More pressing 
challenges emerge 
for UNDP support on 
other development 
issues  
N/A 
Government 
of Fiji 
Grant 
$26,763,418 
Components 1, 2, 3 and 
4, including staff, 
operating costs, 
biosecurity infrastructure 
Co-financing might 
not be fully tracked 
due to lack of 
reporting systems 
PIU will keep records 
of BAF and Partner co-
financing activities 
and budgets. UNDP 

 
 
70 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
and equipment and 
project management 
will follow up annually 
on verification. 
 
Budget Revision and Tolerance: As per UNDP requirements outlined in the UNDP POPP, the project board 
will  agree  on  a  budget  tolerance  level  for  each  plan  under  the  overall  annual  work  plan  allowing  the 
Project Coordinator to expend up to the tolerance level beyond the approved project budget amount for 
the year without requiring a revision from the Project Board. Should the following deviations occur, the 
Project Coordinator and UNDP Country Office will seek the approval of the UNDP-GEF team as these are 
considered major amendments by the GEF:  
a) Budget re-allocations among components in the project with amounts involving 10% of the total project 
grant or more;  
b) Introduction of new budget items/or components that exceed 5% of original GEF allocation. 
Any  over  expenditure  incurred  beyond  the  available  GEF  grant  amount  will  be  absorbed  by  non-GEF 
resources (e.g. UNDP TRAC or cash co-financing).  
 
Refund to Donor: Should a refund of unspent funds to the GEF be necessary, this will be managed directly 
by the UNDP-GEF Unit in New York.  
 
Project Closure: Project closure will be conducted as per UNDP requirements outlined in the UNDP POPP. 
On an exceptional basis only, a no-cost extension beyond the initial duration of the project will be sought 
from in-country UNDP colleagues and then the UNDP-GEF Executive Coordinator.  
 
Operational completion: The project will be operationally completed when the last UNDP-financed inputs 
have been provided and the related activities have been completed. This includes the final clearance of 
the  Terminal  Evaluation  Report  (that  will  be  available  in  English)  and  the  corresponding  management 
response,  and  the  end-of-project  review  Project  Board  meeting.  The  Implementing  Partner  through  a 
Project Board decision will notify the UNDP Country Office when operational closure has been completed. 
At this time, the relevant parties will have already agreed and confirmed in writing on the arrangements 
for the disposal of any equipment that is still the property of UNDP.  
 
Financial completion: The project will be financially closed when the following conditions have been met:  
a) The project is operationally completed or has been cancelled;  
b) The Implementing Partner has reported all financial transactions to UNDP;  
c) UNDP has closed the accounts for the project;  
d) UNDP and the Implementing Partner have certified a final Combined Delivery Report (which serves as 
final budget revision).  
 
The project will be  financially completed within 12 months of operational closure  or after the  date of 
cancellation. Between operational and financial closure, the implementing partner will identify and settle 
all financial obligations and prepare a final expenditure report. The UNDP Country Office will send the 
final  signed  closure  documents  including  confirmation  of  final  cumulative  expenditure  and  unspent 

 
 
71 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
balance to the UNDP-GEF Unit for confirmation before the UNDP Country Office will financially close the 
project in Atlas. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
72 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
X.
 
T
OTAL 
B
UDGET AND 
W
ORK 
P
LAN
 
 
Total Budget and Work Plan 
Atlas Proposal or Award ID: 
00084576 
UNDP-GEF PIMS ID: 
5589 
Atlas Proposal or Award Title: 
00092525 
Atlas Business Unit: 
FJI 10 
Atlas Primary Output Project Title: 
IAS Fiji 
Project Title: 
Building Capacities to Address Invasive Alien Species to Enhance the Chances of Long-term Survival of Terrestrial Endemic and Threatened Species on 
Taveuni Island and Surrounding Islets 
UNDP-GEF PIMS No.  
5589 
Implementing Partner  
Biosecurity Authority of Fiji (Ministry of Economy, Public Enterprises, Public Services and Communication) 
 
 
Implementing 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə