United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə9/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17
part of BAF’s long-term commitment.  

 
Similar sanitation regulations would be developed for boats and ships transiting between islands. 
Minimally hulls and other elements protruding into the water would be free of living organisms. 
Providing inspections with basic training on hull sanitation inspections and equipment  such as 
mirrors  on  poles  would  improve  biosecurity  in  this  regard.  Development  of  initial  procedures 
should be completed by 2019 with updating/upgrading as possible to improve systems as part of 
long-term commitment. 

 
Provision  of  adequate  resources  to  ensure  biosecurity  inspections  are  feasible  for  air  and 
watercraft departing and/or arrive at these islands. Necessary resources would include vehicles 
with  associated  fuel  and  maintenance,  inspection  facilities,  quarantine  facilities,  treatment 
facilities  and  equipment,  communication  resources  (smart  phones  and  internet  access)  office 
space and equipment as part of BAF’s long-term commitment.   

 
Incinerators, quarantine and treatment facilities would minimally be established at Matei Airport 
and the Salia Wharf. Ideally, each point of entry into the four-island group (expect for the air strip 
and wharf on Laucala) would have an inspection services area including quarantine and treatment 
resources. These areas need to be manned by trained biosecurity officers. The inspection services 
areas  should  minimally  include  roof,  inspection  tables,  benches  and  a  lockable  area  to  keep 
various tools and equipment secure. Near to the inspection services area would be an area that 
has been established as a quarantine zone as needed where suspect goods, etc. can be kept until 
they can be thoroughly inspected. Protocols and possibly areas for treating or destroying infested 
items also need to be established. Ideally, small incinerators can be established and maintained 
at  each  point  of  entry  or covered vehicles  provided  to  ferry  infected  items  arriving  at  smaller 
landings to incarnates located at larger points of entry such as the airport or government wharf. 
Existing biosecurity operations minimally require a vehicle to facilitate inspection services. Ideally 
the vehicle should be a newer 4x4 twin cab. An additional two (possibly three) vehicles would be 
needed  to  address  existing  gaps  in  inspection  services.  These  activities  will  be  part  of 
commitments from BAF and its partner agencies 

 
 
87 | 
P a g e
 
 
 

 
Expand existing biosecurity inspections for watercraft, passengers, baggage and cargo between 
Taveuni and Viti Levu, Vanua Levu and other areas within the country.  Includes  inspections of 
large  and  small  commercial  (and  private  used  for  commercial)  conveniences  and  associated 
passengers  and  cargo  departing  from  all  landings,  jetties  and  wharfs.  Implement  biosecurity 
inspections for all watercraft, passengers, baggage and cargo moving between any of the four 
islands (Taveuni, Qamea, Matagi and Laucala). Ensure inspection for all watercraft, passengers, 
baggage and cargo moving to and/or from Qamea, Matagi or Laucala to other parts of Fiji such as 
Viti Levu or Vanua Levu (see Annex 3 for more details). 

 
Agreements with regular transporters would be sought, especially those moving between Taveuni 
and any of the three smaller islands in order to facilitate inspection services on Taveuni both prior 
to  departure  and  on  arrival.  Ideally,  regular  transporters  can,  working  with  BAF  ensure  that 
inspectors  are  on  site  for  both  departures  and  arrivals,  insuring  no  or  minimal  delays  to  the 
transportation system in regards to inspection processes. 

 
Implement biosecurity inspections at airports for aircraft, passengers, baggage and cargo prior to 
arrival and departure on any of these islands. This would include establishing inspection services 
at Nadi and Nasouri airports for flights departing for Taveuni and/or Laucala. It would also include 
establishing biosecurity services at Matei Airport on Taveuni for departing flights. As it would be 
difficult  to  facilitate  biosecurity  inspections  prior  to  flight  departures  on  Laucala,  these  flights 
would be inspected on arrival in Nadi (or Suva depending on where it departs from and arrives 
to), initially as part of co-financing commitments and later as part of the long-term strategy. 

 
Taveuni currently has two full time inspection officers. The minimal number of personnel to cover 
biosecurity  for  the  four-islands  at  the  current  volume  is:  four  full  time  inspection  officers  on 
Taveuni primarily conducting inspection/quarantine processes at Salia, Lovonivonu, Wariki and 
Matei. An additional three part time officers could serve to cover arrivals and departures from 
the various landings to/from Qamea, Matagi and Laucala (and any other locations). There would 
be  a  manager  for  national  projects  within  BAF’s  institutional  structure  to  oversee  day  to  day 
activities of inspection  officers on the four islands and to assist  as needed with general duties 
including inspections. Full and part time positions should be filled by the end of first project year. 

 
In order to establish an adequate workforce to provide inspection services for all water and air 
transport to and from Taveuni, Qamea, Matagi and Laucala, additional officers will be employed
trained  and  resourced  as  part  of  BAF’s  long-term  strategy.  The  majority  of  these  additional 
workers are likely best situated on Taveuni where resources can be shared  among the various 
positions. Additionally, some services which support improved biosecurity for these islands can 
best be developed on Viti Levu, such as departing air craft biosecurity inspections and improved 
inspection of water craft. An example would be for aircraft moving between Nadi and Laucala. 
These flights would be inspected at Nadi International Airport both on departure and on return 
(eliminating  the  need  for  having  biosecurity  officers  present  on  Laucala  prior  to  airplane 
departures from that island).  

 
Continuation  of  the  comprehensive  awareness  program  for  the  four-island  area,  beyond  the 
period of the GEF project with BAF support.  

 
 
88 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
Annex 4  
 
Specific Recommendations for Inspection Services at International Air and Sea Ports (long-term 
strategy of Government of Fiji) 
 
 
1.
 
Nadi International Airport: main international airport for the country  
a.
 
Nadi  International  Airport  inspection  services  are  fairly  complete  at  this  time 
(2016)  for  international  arrivals.  Currently  there  is  100%  screening  of  all 
passengers and their baggage and there are quarantine and treatment rooms. 
b.
 
Institution of biosecurity detector dog team would improve detection potential  
c.
 
There is a need for language translators (especially for Korean and Chinese) to 
support  inspection  services.  Translators  could  be  hired  and  on-call  to  support 
operations as needed.  
d.
 
Need additional training on new x-ray machines  (they have new machines but 
have not received enough training to use them to their full extent), that would be 
included as part of the X-ray machine maintenance costs 
e.
 
Older x-ray machine in cargo area needs parts to make operational  
f.
 
Need to purchase a larger x-ray unit for cargo. Cargo currently arrives daily on 
passenger flights from New Zealand, Australia and the United States. Planned in 
2017.  
g.
 
Need improved produce/cargo inspection area as the current area is extremely 
limited in size and has little to no resources. Inspection area would have multiple 
workbenches with lights and viewing scopes, as well as one or more microscopes. 
This area would also have freezer capacity for destroy pest on site. Planned by 
FRCA and partners to be operational in 2018 
h.
 
Current layout of the inspection services main building and the air cargo facility is 
not ideal. While the buildings are located side by side, there is no direct linkage 
and  inspectors  must  move  items  outside  to  transport  from  one  facility  to  the 
other (this should be addressed if feasible to reduce the potential for organisms 
to escape into the environment). 
 
2.
 
Latoka seaport, second largest seaport after Suva. Latoka handles lots of bulk items for 
export  and  approximately  35%  of  Fiji’s  imports.  Private  yachts  and  fishing  boats  also 
utilize Latoka seaport. There is an incinerator on site (this incinerator is also currently used 
by various other ports such as Vuda and Denarau) 
a.
 
Institute random cargo inspections of a percentage of all cargo volume 
b.
 
Develop  a  specific  quarantine  area  where  suspect  cargo  can  be  stored  until 
properly  inspected  (and  treated  if  needed).  All  major  ports  should  have  a 
quarantine area for suspect cargo storage until it can be treated and/or returned 
to the ship. Area idea is enclosed so that any suspect containers can be opened 
and inspected inside the quarantine area without risk of pest being released. 
c.
 
Current wash down area has dirt substrate and is located proximal to the bay and 
a fence with vegetation. This is unsuitable and should not be utilized as a wash 
down area. The wash down area needs to be located away from water and fence 

 
 
89 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
edge  and must  have  an asphalt or concrete base with drains to collect run-off 
(including dirt and organisms) for treatment.  
d.
 
The treatment area is located in the middle of the port and while it has a cement 
substrate, it is currently covered by several inches of dirt and loose stone. Ideally, 
the  treatment  area should  be  better contained,  perhaps  with  sidings, etc. The 
treatment area should be clean and well maintained to reduce the potential of 
organism  escape.  Any  residuals  from  treatment  should  be  collected  and 
incinerated. 
e.
 
Amnesty bins with appropriate signage should be strategically placed around the 
port and check and any items deposited property treated immediately. 
 
3.
 
Vuda port 
a.
 
Should have its own quarantine and treatment facilities, including an incinerator 
so that items do not need to be transported to Latoka for treatment/destruction 
reducing the potential of organism escape while in transport. 
 
4.
 
Denarau seaport 
a.
 
Needs  1-2  additional  biosecurity  officers  to  ensure  appropriate  inspection 
services at current volume levels 
b.
 
Should have its own quarantine and treatment facilities, including an incinerator 
so that items do not need to be transported to Latoka for treatment/destruction 
reducing the potential of organism escape while in transport. 
 
5.
 
Rotuma airport 
a.
 
 Rotuma  airport  is  tentatively scheduled to  be  developed  into  an  international 
port and therefore, as part of this process ensure that biosecurity is upgrade to 
augment these changes as they occur 
 
 

 
 
90 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
Annex 5  
Wharfs, Jetties and Landing at Taveuni and Laucala: Biosecurity Recommendations (BAF long-term 
strategy) 
 

 
There are various wharfs, jetties and landings in the four-island area. To ensure the maximum 
capacity for inspection services biosecurity on Taveuni should (as much as feasible) conduct of 
inspection  services  for  both  arriving  and  departing  craft  from  all  of  these  location,  should  be 
instituted (to the extent feasible) with the exception of the large ferries at the government wharf 
where arrivals should be inspected, but departing ferries can be inspected on arrival at their next 
destination.  
 

 
Lovonivonu jetty (also known as the Korean Wharf): This jetty is located near Naqara and is the 
main jetty for passenger ferries to and from Vanua Levu. There were two ferries  but  one was 
damaged in Cyclone Winston during early 2016 and during the June 2016 site visit neither ferry 
was running, as the remaining ferry was under-going repair. Smaller private boats are still making 
the  run  between  Taveuni and  Vanua  Levu.  Biosecurity officers  need  to  be  able  to check  main 
ferryboats daily and should also be inspecting private craft when feasible. The main ferries usually 
run  on  a  morning  schedule,  departing  Taveuni  around  8AM  and  returning  from  Vanua  Levu 
around noon. Small private boats currently go whenever.  
 

 
Salia Jetty (Government wharf), just south of Waiyevo: Utilized mainly by roll on/roll off ferries, 
which  have  specific  schedules.  Biosecurity officers  are  already  monitoring off-loading  of  these 
large  ferries.  A  specific  inspection  area  should  be  established  as  well  as  a  quarantine  and 
treatment area. An incinerator should be established as well. Time needs to be made available for 
inspection process and detailed inspections need to occur for a higher percentage of the total 
cargo and passengers. 
 

 
Wariki landing: haphazard usage by small boats to and from Vanua Levu. Generally used to bring 
shoppers  to  Taveuni  from smaller  communities on  Vanua  Levu.  Landing  is  just  below  Catholic 
mission. When possible these boats and their cargo should be inspected. If there is a regular or 
semi-regular service to bring shoppers to Taveuni, it may be feasible to have boat captains contact 
BAF  on  Taveuni  to  inform  them  of  approximate  arrival  and  departure  times  to  better  insure 
inspection are completed.  
 

 
Boats going to and from Yanuca Island utilize small landing just east of Matei Airport. These boats 
should be inspected as feasible. Again, if there is a regular or semi-regular service provided it may 
be  feasible  to  arrange  to  have  boat  captains  contact  BAF  regarding  approximate  arrival  and 
departure times to facilitate inspections.  
  

 
There are three landings utilized by boats arriving from and departing to the outer islands (Qamea, 
Matagi and Laucala) to arrive on Taveuni. Boats typically arrive on high tides during the daytime. 
Saturdays  are  the  highest  traffic  level  for  these  three  landings.  Boats  should  be  cleared  by 
biosecurity officers on arrival and departure. Most boats utilize the landing closest to Lavena. This 
landing is a sand beach and is referred to as the third landing. As many as 17 boats may arrive 
here on any given Saturday. Larger boats coming to/from the resorts on the outer islands mostly 

 
 
91 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
utilize the second landing. If agreements were established, the various resorts could contact BAF 
in Taveuni to inform them of boat arrival/departure dates and relative times, enabling biosecurity 
officers to be on-site at arrivals and departures to conduct inspection services.  
 

 
Laucala island resort has its own small cargo ship which runs between Laucala and Suva twice per 
week. This ship should be clearing biosecurity inspections both prior to departure and on arrival 
in Suva. Currently it may have inspections prior to departures but likely nothing for arrivals. Since 
it cannot be inspected easily in Laucala, it should be inspected on arrival in Suva. 
 

 
Laucala has a personnel ferry that runs between Laucala and Qamea daily. BAF should work with 
the resort to develop biosecurity regulations for this craft and likely with minimal oversight, the 
resort should be able to ensure appropriate biosecurity is in place and enforced for this craft.  
 
 

 
 
92 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
Annex 6 
Strategic and Tactical Plan for Eradication of Giant Invasive Iguanas (Iguana iguana) from Fiji 
 
Background 
 
A  foreign  landowner  released  approximately  ten  juveniles  of  the  invasive  American  iguana  (Iguana 
iguana) on his Qamea property in 2000. In Fiji, these animals are referred to most commonly as Giant 
Invasive Iguanas (GII). This species has proven to be a major pest throughout the Caribbean area where 
introduced (Falcon et al., 2013) because of the tremendous densities that it can establish and its impact 
on  vegetation  and  human-made  structures.  The  original  Qamea  animals  spread  rapidly  and  are  now 
known to heavily infest Qamea and Matagi (Fig. 1). They likely infest Laucala to a similar extent, but that 
island is privately owned and operated as an exclusive resort, and the managers of the island deny that 
they see iguanas, even though animals have been retrieved from there and workers on the island report 
seeing them. Hence, the exact degree of infestation on Laucala remains unknown. The situation on the 
much larger island of Taveuni remains even  more uncertain.  Four iguanas were retrieved from widely 
separated  localities on  that  island  between  2010–2014,  and  at  least  nine  other  unconfirmed  sightings 
have  also  been  reported  from  the  island  (van  Veen,  2011),  raising  concerns  that  the  species  may  be 
established there as well. However, survey work in iguana habitat and among the inhabitants of Taveuni 
has  not  been  comprehensive  enough  to  determine  whether  iguanas  are  established  there  or  not. 
Outreach activities on that island have been suspended for the past three years, so recent information on 
possible sightings is not available. Furthermore, single reports of iguanas have been received from Vanua 
Levu, Koro, and Wayaka islands (van Veen, 2011). 
 
 
Figure 4.1. Known locations of capture or sightings of the Giant Invasive Iguana on the islands of Qamea
Matagi, and Laucala (red dots). Information retrieved from BAF personnel and villagers of Qamea. 
 
 

 
 
93 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
The first iguana reported to officials was in 2002, and by 2009 there was sufficient concern about the 
iguanas that survey and awareness campaigns were initiated. From 2009–2014, a number of reports was 
produced  summarizing  knowledge  of  the  iguana  situation  in  Fiji  and  making  recommendations  for 
immediate  management  response  (Naikatini  et  al.,  2009;  Harlow  and  Thomas,  2010;  van  Veen,  2011; 
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti, 2013; Saunders, 2014; Saunders and van Veen, 2014). Details about the history 
and development of this invasion as well as likely impacts in Fiji if the iguanas are allowed to explode in 
numbers may be sought in those references and need not be repeated here. Details aside, what may be 
generally concluded is that if a program of eradication is not begun on a professional footing very soon, 
the iguanas will spread beyond control in Fiji, from there they are likely to eventually colonize other island 
groups in the region, and the hospitable habitat in this region makes it possible, if not likely, that damages 
to vegetation, subsistence farming, and human structures will be similar to what has been experienced in 
the Caribbean. This need for immediate eradication has been emphasized in every report on GII in Fiji 
since 2010. 
Recommendations  for  how  to  proceed  with  iguana  eradication  have  been  given  in  van  Veen  (2011), 
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti (2013), and Saunders (2014). The general conclusions in those reports are sound
although some of their recommendations are not ideal given the logistical limitations of working in the 
field on the infested islands and given the time constraints that are applicable now that the iguanas have 
been  allowed  to  spread  for  16  years.  What  I  provide  here  is  a  series  of  logistical  and  tactical 
recommendations that must be met for iguana eradication to have any chance of success in Fiji. I also 
comment on a few of the previously made recommendations and previously taken actions that pertain to 
eradication  success.  Lastly,  there  are  several  of  the  risks  that  must  be  minimized  in  order  to  achieve 
successful eradication of GII from Fiji. 
 
General Principles 
 
 
First  a  few comments are  necessary  as  to what  is  required  in  order  for an  eradication  program  to  be 
successful. As made clear by Bomford and O’Brien (1995), there are three criteria that must be met to 
ensure eradication of alien vertebrate populations: 
1) The rate of removal must exceed the rate of increase at all population densities. 
2) Immigration into the treated area must be prevented. 
3) All reproductive animals must be put at risk. 
The first requirement is very problematic for GII because the fecundity of the species is high, with females 
laying one clutch/year of up to 80 eggs. Obviously, this reproductive capability gives the species a high 
potential  rate  of  population  increase,  as  suggested  by  growth  projections  provided  in  NatureFiji-
MareqetiViti (2013) and Saunders (2014). It is not yet clear that humans alone can provide this high level 
of predation pressure on iguanas, and this is a major risk for any eradication program for this species. How 
to best meet this need is discussed below (see Strategic Concerns, item 4). In the present instance, the 
second requirement is readily met if eradication operations occur on all infested islands simultaneously 

 
 
94 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
because  there  is  no  other  source  for  iguana  immigration  in  Fiji.  The  third  requirement  may  well  be 
achievable with GII in Fiji, as discussed below (see Strategic Concerns, item 5). 
 
 
A  second  point  must  be  understood  from  the  beginning  of  any  eradication  project.  Every  eradication 
operation is a high-risk project, meaning that even with a major, competent effort being undertaken there 
is no guarantee of ultimate success. This is because the biological attributes of the species, or the logistical 
features of the area to be treated, may be beyond the capabilities of humans to effectively overcome. 
Examples  that  can  lead  to  failure  include  a  species’  high  reproductive  rate,  difficulty  of  detection,  or 
absence of effective control methods. Humans too can undermine eradication operations by transporting 
the  targeted  species  to  new  locations,  thereby  sabotaging  the  eradication  program,  or  by  politically 
hindering response actions until it is too late to control populations. Having noted these limitations, it is 
important to also note that many improvements in eradication technology, planning, and execution have 
been made in the past two or three decades, and eradications are now successfully occurring in areas 
much larger than thought possible only a few years ago. However, this applies primarily to eradication 
efforts aimed at invasive mammals because most effort has been directed against them. As yet, there is 
no example of a successful eradication program against an invasive reptile anywhere in the world. This 
should not be understood as a statement that all eradication attempts directed at an invasive reptile are 
doomed  to  fail.  Instead,  this  poor  record  is  a  reflection  that  “eradication”  attempts  against  invasive 
reptiles  have always been undertaken at  a point  in the  invasion process at which the species was too 
numerous  to  remove,  and  these  programs  have  typically  not  involved  the  commitment  of  sufficient 
resources to see efforts through to completion. In short, poor planning and execution are to blame for 
the present absence of successful alien reptile eradications.  
 
 
In the case of GII in Fiji, 7 years have now elapsed since concerns about the invasion were raised, and 16 
years have elapsed since the original introduction event. Much critical time has been lost, but it may still 
be feasible to eradicate these lizards if a comprehensive, competently executed program is immediately 
put in place. Nonetheless, such an eradication project still entails a large degree of risk both because the 
population status of iguanas is poorly known on all islands and because effective control tools are limited 
and not yet rigorously trialed. However, the risk of not making the attempt is likely higher than attempting 
the eradication because the consequences of millions of iguanas throughout Fiji are likely to be dire to 
native biodiversity and human livelihoods. 
 
 
A final point that must be recognized is psychological. “Eradication” means reducing a population to zero 
animals (or at least terminating reproduction while the remaining animals die of natural causes); it does 
not mean reducing a population only to a point where animals become difficult to find. As a result, it is 
often pointed out that 90% of the resources spent in an eradication program may be spent removing the 
last handful of animals. This must be recognized from the outset of an eradication operation because once 
animals become difficult to find, staff interest, morale, and effectiveness can decline. This psychological 
limitation  needs  to  be  understood  and  planned  for  from  the  very  beginning  of  the  operation.  It  may 
require that new staff be hired at periodic intervals, but most effective is that staff be trained from the 

 
 
95 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
outset to expect this result and work their way through it – much like a marathon runner expects to hit 
“the wall” and nonetheless works his/her way through it with determination and discipline.  The same 
discipline  will  be  needed  to  ensure  successful  completion  of  any  eradication  program.  This  need  for 
discipline  applies  not only to the field staff doing the control work.  It is equally critical for the agency 
managers and funders to recognize from the onset of a project the need to commit sufficient resources 
and time to see the project through to completion. In the case of GII in Fiji, this is likely to require ten or 
more years because the lapse of time since the original introduction has allowed iguana numbers to reach 
high numbers. 
 
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə