University of Groningen Mauritius since the last glacial



Yüklə 195.73 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü195.73 Kb.
  1   2   3

 

 

 



University of Groningen

Mauritius since the last glacial

Van Der Plas, Geert W.; De Boer, Erik J.; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Florens, F. B. Vincent;

Baider, Claudia; van der Plicht, Johannes

Published in:

Journal of Quaternary Science



DOI:

10.1002/jqs.1526



IMPORTANT NOTE: You are advised to consult the publisher's version (publisher's PDF) if you wish to

cite from it. Please check the document version below.

Document Version

Publisher's PDF, also known as Version of record



Publication date:

2012


Link to publication in University of Groningen/UMCG research database

Citation for published version (APA):

Van Der Plas, G. W., De Boer, E. J., Hooghiemstra, H., Florens, F. B. V., Baider, C., & Van Der Plicht, J.

(2012). Mauritius since the last glacial: environmental and climatic reconstruction of the last 38 000 years

from Kanaka Crater. Journal of Quaternary Science, 27(2), 159-168. DOI: 10.1002/jqs.1526



Copyright

Other than for strictly personal use, it is not permitted to download or to forward/distribute the text or part of it without the consent of the

author(s) and/or copyright holder(s), unless the work is under an open content license (like Creative Commons).

Take-down policy

If you believe that this document breaches copyright please contact us providing details, and we will remove access to the work immediately

and investigate your claim.

Downloaded from the University of Groningen/UMCG research database (Pure): http://www.rug.nl/research/portal. For technical reasons the

number of authors shown on this cover page is limited to 10 maximum.

Download date: 18-08-2017



Mauritius since the last glacial: environmental and

climatic reconstruction of the last 38 000 years

from Kanaka Crater

GEERT W. VAN DER PLAS,

1

ERIK J. DE BOER,



1

* HENRY HOOGHIEMSTRA,

1

* F. B. VINCENT FLORENS,



2

CLAUDIA BAIDER

3

and JOHANNES VAN DER PLICHT



4,5

1

Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam,



The Netherlands

2

Department of Biosciences, University of Mauritius, Re´duit, Mauritius



3

Mauritius Herbarium, Mauritius Sugar Industry Research Institute, Re´duit, Mauritius

4

Center for Isotope Research, University of Groningen, The Netherlands



5

Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Received 13 January 2011; Revised 20 May 2011; Accepted 22 May 2011

ABSTRACT: A 10 m long peat core from the Kanaka Crater (20

8 25

0

S, 57



8 31

0

E), located at 560 m elevation in



Mauritius, was analyzed for microfossils. Eight radiocarbon ages show the pollen record reflects environmental and

climatic change of the last ca. 38 cal ka BP. The record shows that the island was continuously covered by forest with

Erica heath (Philippia) in the uplands. Cyperaceous reedswamp with Pandanus trees was abundant in the coastal

lowlands as well as locally in the waterlogged crater. The record shows changes in climatic humidity (wet from 38.0 to

22.7 cal ka BP, drier from 22.7 to 10.6 cal ka BP, and wetter again from 10.6 cal ka BP to recent) as the main response to

climate change. A high turnover in montane forest species is evidenced at 22.7 cal ka BP and at the start of the

Holocene. The limited altitudinal ranges in the mountains of Mauritius (maximum altitude 828 m), and changing

humidity being more important than changing temperature, suggests that in response to climate change a reassortment

in taxonomic composition of montane forests might be equally important as displacement of forest types to new

altitudinal intervals. We found weak impact of the latitudinal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and

data suggest that the Indian Ocean Dipole is a more important driver for climatic change in the southwest Indian

Ocean. Copyright

# 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

KEYWORDS: Mauritius; Kanaka Crater; pollen analysis; Indian Ocean Dipole; climate change.

Introduction: oceanic island systems and

climate change

Climate change may trigger individual plant taxa to migrate to

new areas where plant-specific ecological ranges are within the

range of climate variability. Plant communities and higher-

ranked vegetation belts often include many taxa with similar

ecological ranges, causing floristic discontinuities in the

composition of the forests along climatological gradients,

temperature, humidity and atmospheric CO

2

pressure in



particular. Therefore, in the past, climate change resulted in

a concerted migration of main vegetation types. Climate

change-driven altitudinal shifts of main vegetation belts on East

African mountains (e.g. Hedberg, 1951, 1964; Coetzee, 1967;

van Zinderen Bakker and Coetzee, 1988) were further

specified, for example, for Mount Kilimanjaro (Hemp, 2005,

2006), Mount Kenya (Street-Perrott et al., 2007) and Mada-

gascar (Gasse and Van Campo, 1998). In tropical lowlands

vegetation change is more related to changes in annual

precipitation, seasonality, and in coastal areas the distance to

the seashore (Zinke et al., 2003; Hoelzmann et al., 2004;

Kro¨pelin et al., 2008). Also, records of past precipitation and

palaeohydrology of East African lakes (Johnson et al., 2000;

Barker et al., 2004) show the response of climate change on

local and regional ecosystems. However, some records hardly

show evidence of changing plant composition across periods of

major global climate change (Mumbi et al., 2008) and this

seems best explained by the dampening effect of the Indian

Ocean hot water pool (Marchant et al., 2006).

Small oceanic islands do not allow plant taxa to migrate

significantly in order to balance the ecological requirements to

changing climatic conditions. With sea-level stands lowered by

$120 m during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (Yokoyama

et al., 2000; Lambeck and Chappell, 2001) the modern surface

of Mauritius of 1865 km

2

increased



$20%. Under all

conditions Mauritius had a very limited surface, hardly

allowing individual plant taxa and higher-ranked plant

associations to migrate. Humid riverine gallery forests may

function as a relatively stable stock of plant diversity which

offers shelter to plant taxa during a variety of climatological

conditions (Hannah et al., 2008).

Endemic island species evolved in isolation from continental

species, often in the absence of large herbivores and predators

(Biber, 2002). Endemic species are therefore vulnerable to

exotic species introduced by humans. Extinctions caused by

colonization have occurred on many islands (Burney, 1997;

Whittaker and Ferna´ndez-Palacios, 2007) and are well

documented. Understanding causality and mechanisms of

these historic extinctions can broaden the understanding of

prehistoric extinctions (Diamond, 1984).

Undisturbed lake sediments and peat deposits enable

reconstruction of past vegetational and climatic change.

Records of environmental change in Mauritius may provide

a frame that can be used to better understand how in a small

island a high level of diversity is conserved across environ-

mental changes from glacial to interglacial conditions. In

addition, a reconstruction of the vegetation from the period just

before humans arrived shows a document of the natural

vegetation and may help as a blueprint for conservation and

restoration activities.

Here we present the first study of the environmental history of

Mauritius. We selected the 10 m long peat core from Kanaka

Crater to show a pollen-based document of vegetation change

and inferred past climatic conditions. We aimed to assess levels

JOURNAL OF QUATERNARY SCIENCE (2012) 27(2) 159–168

ISSN 0267-8179. DOI: 10.1002/jqs.1526

Copyright

ß 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

*Correspondence: E. J. De Boer and H. Hooghiemstra, as above.

E-mails: e.j.deboer@uva.nl and h.hooghiemstra@uva.nl



of past environmental change across the LGM and we make first

comparisons with pollen-based records of environmental

change from Madagascar and East Africa. This paper paves

the way for ongoing studies in Mauritius from other craters as

well as from coastal lowland sites. This will allow us to arrive at

a later moment at a regional synthesis of Late Pleistocene

environmental change and hints for driving mechanisms

involved.

Setting

Geology and geography



Mauritius, together with the islands Re´union and Rodrigues,

form the archipelago of the Mascarene Islands. Mauritius has a

volcanic origin, and is located in the southwest Indian Ocean

between latitude 19

8 50

0

and 20



8 51

0

S and longitude 57



8 18

0

and 57



8 48

0

E (Fig. 1). It was formed between 7.8 and 6.8 million



years ago (McDougall and Chamalaun, 1969) from a volcanic

hotspot currently located off the southeast coast of Re´union.

Volcanic activity on Mauritius lasted until 25 cal ka BP (Camoin

et al., 2004). The highest peak on Mauritius is located in the

southwest at 828 m altitude.

Kanaka Crater lies in the southern mountains at 560 m

altitude. It reflects a well-formed cone with a diameter of 300 m

at the top (Fig. 2). The age of the cone and the most recent

period of volcanic activity are unknown. The centre of the

crater is occupied by a mire without open water.

Climate

In tropical areas climatic conditions are determined by the



position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The

position relates to the latitude of maximum solar insolation. On

an annual timescale the seasonal shift of the sun drives the ITCZ

northward during the Northern Hemisphere summer and

southward during the Southern Hemisphere summer. As a

result, the patterns of the tropical monsoon system are driven by

solar insolation (Kutzbach, 1981). On orbital timescales

climate change in tropical areas is most influenced by the

Earth’s precessional cycle (Pokras and Mix, 1987; Cruz et al.,

2005) with a frequency band between 19 and 23 ka. The

maximum values of solar insolation and as a consequence the

belt with maximum precipitation migrates between 20

8 N and

20

8 S. Higher insolation values would result in stronger summer



monsoons, whereas lower insolation values would result in

weaker monsoons (Kutzbach, 1981; Ruddiman, 2006). Thus

Mauritius is expected to experience a climatic extreme every

half precession cycle at 10 ka distance in time.

Another important driver of climate is the Indian Ocean

Dipole (IOD), a system of independent ocean circulation in the

Indian Ocean (Marchant et al., 2006). The IOD causes

anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) variability – with

high SSTs in the western Indian Ocean and low SSTs in the

eastern Indian Ocean – which has an impact on regional

atmospheric circulation and rainfall (Saji et al., 1999). In the

Eastern Arc Mountains in Tanzania, moist air derived from the

Indian Ocean has resulted in relative ecosystem stability across

the LGM (Mumbi et al., 2008). The influence of the IOD

interferes with the potential impact of precessional-driven

climate change and may provide a regional specific response.

Vegetation

The flora of Mauritius has a high degree of endemism, with

39.5% of the flowering plant species endemic to Mauritius and

21.7% endemic to the Mascarene Islands (Baider et al., 2010).

Mauritius was almost entirely forested before human coloniza-

tion, which started in AD 1638. After human colonization,

ecosystems became rapidly degraded and destroyed. Today

only remnants of native vegetation covering some 2% of the

island surface can be found (Baider et al., 2010), but all

vegetation remnants have been invaded by exotics (Lorence

and Sussman, 1986).

Native vegetation types comprise seven major categories,

mostly determined by altitude and annual precipitation: coastal

areas, palm savanna, lowland forest, lower montane forest,

moist forest, montane forest and azonal uplands (Vaughan and

Wiehe, 1937; Florens and Baider, pers. comm.) (Table 1).

Coastal areas comprise ecosystems such as mangroves,

coraline sand dunes and coastal wetlands. Palm savannas

grow under natural conditions in the coastal plains on the driest

leeward areas of the island (Safford, 1997). The palm savannas

in Mauritius have been completely replaced by cultivations of

sugar cane (Vaughan and Wiehe, 1937). Round Island, a small

island some 10 km north of the mainland of Mauritius, was

connected to the mainland during last glacial lower sea-level

stands; here some palm savannas have been left. Under wetter

conditions palm savannas would have been succeeded by

lowland forest. The lowland forests were also quickly destroyed

after human colonization and no longer occur in Mauritius

(Vaughan and Wiehe, 1937). Lower montane forest prevails in

areas under influence of a rain shadow. Higher up on the

slopes, up to the highest areas of Mauritius, moist forest is

growing. Montane forest grows in the wettest parts of the slopes

and the uplands. The uplands record the highest amounts of

rainfall. Several vegetation types, such as Pandanus marsh,

Sideroxylon thicket and Erica heath, are clustered under the

category azonal upland vegetation.

Figure 1. Location of the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean and

elevation map of Mauritius. The location of sites mentioned in the text

(Kanaka Crater, Tatos) and Port Louis, the capital of Mauritius, are

shown. This figure is available in colour online at wileyonlinelibrary.

com.

Copyright



ß 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

J. Quaternary Sci., Vol. 27(2) 159–168 (2012)

160

JOURNAL OF QUATERNARY SCIENCE



Materials and methods

In the Kanaka Crater the 10 m long Kanaka-1 core was collected

in July 2008 with a Russian corer (Fig. 2). The sediments were

continuous except for a small gap from 418 to 428 cm core

depth. The infill thickness of the crater basin (Fig. 2) was

measured in August 2010 with a 5 mm diameter fibreglass rod

with extension rods of 95 cm length. To establish a chrono-

logical framework 11

14

C dates were obtained from bulk



samples. Calibration was done with the CALIB 6.0 software

(Stuiver and Reimer, 1993), using the IntCal09 calibration

curve (Reimer et al., 2009). For pollen analysis, a sample

volume of 1–1.5 cm

3

was taken at 10 cm intervals along the



core. Prior to processing, one tablet with exotic Lycopodium

spores was added to a known sample volume to allow the

calculation of pollen concentration values. All samples were

prepared using standard pretreatment techniques including

sodium pyrophosphate, acetolysis and heavy liquid separation

by a bromoform–ethanol mixture, specific gravity 2 (Faegri and

Iversen, 1989). Pollen residues were mounted in glycerine

gelatine and analysed with a Leitz microscope at 400

Â

magnification. About 400 pollen grains were counted for the



pollen sum. Identification, where possible, was based on pollen

morphological literature from East Africa (Caratini and Guinet,

1974; Bonnefille and Riollet, 1980) and in particular the pollen

morphological documentation published by H. Straka and co-

workers between 1964 and 1989 in the series ‘Palynologia

Madagassica et Mascarenica’ (listed in Hooghiemstra and Van

Geel, 1998). We also used the African Pollen Database (http://

medias3.mediasfrance.org/apd/accueil.htm) for identifications

and have asked several African pollen experts for help with

determination. All pollen grains were included in the pollen

Figure 2. (A) Schematic drawing of the floor

of the Kanaka crater. ‘a’ indicates contours of

the peat surface; the area between contours ‘a’

and ‘b’ indicates shrub vegetation on the peat

surface and ‘c’ indicates the contour of the

present crater floor. (B) Peat and sediment

thickness of the Kanaka mire. (C) Photograph

taken from the rim on the southeast corner of

the crater (photo by G. W. van der Plas).

Indicated by an arrow is the coring site and

indicated by an ‘f’ is the fern patch, and ‘a’, ‘b’

and ‘c’ indicate the contours of the crater floor.

This figure is available in colour online at

wileyonlinelibrary.com.

Table 1. Categories of native vegetation according to differences in altitude (m), annual precipitation (mm) and characterizing taxa.

Characterizing taxa

Coastal areas (altitude 0–50 m and rainfall 800–1500 mm a

À1

)



Rhizophora, Bruguiera (Rhizophoraceae), Canavalia (Fabaceae), Lycium mascarense (Solanaceae), Acrostichum (Pteridaceae),

Sesuvium ayresii (Aizoaceae), Zoysia matrella, Lepturus repens (Poaceae), Ipomoea (Convolvulacae), Typha dominguensis

(Typhaceae), Atriplex (Amaranthaceae)

Palm savanna (altitude 0–150 m and rainfall 800–1200 mm a

À1

)

Latania, Hyophorbe lagenicaulis (Arecaceae), Lomatophyllum tormentorii (Asphodelaceae), Pandanus vandermeeschii (Pan-



danaceae), Dracaena concinna (Asparagaceae), Ficus (Moraceae), Chrysopogon argutus, Cymbopogon caesius (Poaceae)

Lowland forest (altitude 50–350 m and rainfall 1200–1600 mm a

À1

)

Diospyros (Ebenaceae), Foetidia (Lecythidaceae), Cassine (Celastraceae), Erythroxylum (Erytroxylaceae), Protium obtusifolium



(Burseraceae), Mimusops peiolaris (Sapotaceae), Eugenia (Myrtaceae), Terminalia bentzoe (Combretaceae), Ixora, Fernelia,

Buxifolia, Coffea (Rubiaceae)

Lower montane forest (altitude 200–550 m and rainfall 1600–2000 mm a

À1

)



Warneckea trinervis (Melastomataceae), Syzygium, Eugenia (Myrtaceae), Mimusopus, Labourdannasia (Sapotaceae), Dios-

pyros (Ebenaceae), Ixora, Pyrostria (Rubiaceae), Protium obtusifolium (Burseraceae), Olea lancea (Oleaceae), Grangeria

borbonica (Chrysobalanaceae)

Moist forest (altitude 400–850 m and rainfall 2000–2600 mm a

À1

)

Eugenia, Syzygium (Myrtaceae), Nuxia verticillata (Stilbaceae), Sideroxylon, Mimusops maxima (Sapotaceae), Erythrospermum



(Achariaceae), Tabernaemontana (Apocynaceae), Aphloia (Aphloiaceae), Cassine (Celastraceae), Canarium (Burseraceae),

Gaertnera, Chassalia (Rubiaceae), Pilea (Urticaceae), Cyathea (Cyatheaceae), Cnestis glabra (Connaraceae), Harungana

madagascariensis (Clusiaceae), Clematis mauritiana (Ranunculaceae), various ferns

Montane forest (altitude 500–850 m and rainfall 2600–3800 mm a

À1

)

Syzygium (Myrtaceae), Nuxia verticillata (Stilbaceae), Pandanus (Pandanaceae), Cyathea (Cyatheaceae), Weinmannia (Cuno-



niaceae), Pilea (Urticaceae), Tambourissa/Monimia (Monimiaceae), Calophyllum (Clusiaceae), Roussea simplex (Roussaceae),

various ferns

Azonal uplands (altitude 550–700 m and rainfall 3000–3200 mm a

À1

)



Pandanus marsh

Pandanus (Pandanaceae), Machaerina (Cyperaceae), Calophyllum (Clusiaceae), Cyathea (Cyatheaceae)

Sideroxylon thicket Sideroxylon (Sapotaceae), Dictyosperma, Acanthophoenix, Hyophorbe vaughanii (Arecacea), Syzygium (Myrtaceae), Anti-

rrhea, Gaertnera (Rubiaceae)

Erica heath

Erica (previously named Philippia) (Ericaceae), Phillica (Rhamnaceae), Psiadia, Helichrysum (Asteraceae)

Copyright

ß 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

J. Quaternary Sci., Vol. 27(2) 159–168 (2012)

MAURITIUS SINCE THE LAST GLACIAL

161


sum, with the exception of known aquatic taxa, fern spores,

fungal spores and non-pollen palynomorphs. After the pollen

sum was reached, the remaining part of the microscope slide

was examined at 250

 magnification for new rare pollen and

spore types and the presence of charcoal particles. Pollen

diagrams were plotted with TILIA 1.5.12 (Grimm, 1993, 2004)

software. Zonation was based on CONISS analysis, included in

the TILIA program. All pollen and spore types and non-pollen

palynomorphs were documented and numbered. Identified

plant taxa (Table 2) were categorized into ecological groups

with the botanical expertise of Vincent Florens and Claudia

Baider. Ecological information from Rouillard and Gue´ho

(1999) was also used.

Results

Lithology and chronology



The 10 m long core consisted of homogeneous peat, mainly

consisting of rootlets and sparsely of wood fragments. Eleven

accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates were

obtained from bulk material (Table 3). The samples at

443 cm and 996 cm depth cause an inversion in the age vs.

depth relationship. This points to contamination of the samples

and these dates have been rejected to produce the age model.

The sample at 695 cm depth shows too old an age and also has

been rejected. Accumulation rates increased between 14 and

10 cal ka BP (Fig. 3) from approximately 60 to 20 a cm

À1

.

Additional inspection of the core did not indicate a change in



peat growth. The best explanation for the net increase in the

production of plant biomass could be wetter conditions after

11 cal ka BP. Accepting a linear accumulation rate between

dated samples and accepting the top as recent, the age of the

boundaries between pollen zones was calculated.

Zonation and description

Based on the CONISS analysis and regional vegetation change,

six pollen zones could be recognized: zones KAN1-1 to KAN1-

6. The sum of ecological groups, pollen sum values and

CONISS dendrogram (Fig. 4) and the individual records of all

taxa and unidentified types (Fig. 5) form the basis of the


Каталог: research -> portal -> files
research -> Qonaqpяrvяrlik tяdqiqatlarы Beynяlxalq jurnal
research -> 2017 university of queensland development fellowships c1 research-industry capacity area plan
research -> Learn About Your Health
research -> Research your Way to Good Health with the Internet What Kind of Health Information is on the Internet?
research -> A genome-wide crispr screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes
research -> Revised january 30, 2009 a tangled web
research -> 6000 – 7000 species Ectothermic Pulmonary respiration
research -> The Misdiagnosis Of Bipolar Disorder As Major Depression In The Primary Care Setting Nasa Valentine, md
research -> Solid Pollen Germination Medium (pgm): (Zhengbio Yang laboratory, University of California, Riverside)
files -> Het topje van de ijsberg


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə