Vegetation and Flora Survey Report



Yüklə 1.1 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/11
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1.1 Mb.
növüReport
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Appendix J 

Vegetation and Flora Survey Report

 

 

 



 

 


 

URS0404/022/05 

 

 

 

 

FLORA AND VEGETATION 

 

IN THE 

 

PROPOSED COBURN MINERAL SAND MINE 

 

COBURN, HAMELIN AND MEADOW STATIONS 

 

- SHARK BAY - 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepared for: 



URS Australia Pty Ltd 

 

On behalf of: 



Gunson Resources Ltd 

 

Prepared by: 



Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

 



June 2005 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

Flora and Vegetation Study 

 

 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 Page 

1. SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................................. 1 

2. INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................ 2 

2.1 Location ................................................................................................................................................. 3 

2.2 Climate ................................................................................................................................................... 3 

2.3 


Declared Rare, Priority and Threatened Species .................................................................................... 3 

2.4 Vegetation .............................................................................................................................................. 6 

2.5 

Local and Regional Significance............................................................................................................ 6 



2.6 Threatened 

Ecological Communities ..................................................................................................... 6 



3. OBJECTIVES .............................................................................................................................................. 7 

4. METHODS ................................................................................................................................................... 7 

4.1 Flora 

and 

Vegetation .............................................................................................................................. 7 



4.2 Survey 

Limitations ................................................................................................................................. 8 



5. RESULTS ..................................................................................................................................................... 8 

5.1 Flora ....................................................................................................................................................... 8 

5.2 

Rare and Priority Flora........................................................................................................................... 9 



5.3 Vegetation ............................................................................................................................................ 13 

5.4 Vegetation Condition ........................................................................................................................... 15 

5.5 Significance 

of 


Plant Communities ...................................................................................................... 15 

5. DISCUSSION ............................................................................................................................................. 16 

7. RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 18 

8. LIST 

OF 

PARTICIPANTS ....................................................................................................................... 18 

9. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ......................................................................................................................... 18 

10. REFERENCES....................................................................................................................................... 19 

 

Flora and Vegetation Study 

 

 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 



 

TABLES 

 

1: 



Definition of Rare and Priority Flora Species (Department of Conservation and Land Management, 

2005) 


 

2: 


Categories of Threatened Flora Species (Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, 

1999) 


 

3: 


Distribution of Priority Flora within the Coburn Survey Area. 

 

4: 



Rare and Priority Flora recorded in other surveys of the Irwin and Carnarvon Botanical Districts that 

were not found in the present survey. 

 

 

 

FIGURES 

 

1 to 15: Gunson Resources Ltd – Vegetation Maps 



 

16: 


Rare and Priority Species  

 

 



APPENDICES 

 

A: 



Comparison of Vascular Plant Species recorded in the Coburn Survey Area and in other similar areas in 

the Carnarvon Basin 

 

B: 


Summary of Vascular Plant Species recorded within each Plant Community in the Coburn Survey Area 

 

C: 



Summary of Flowering Periods for Vascular Plant Species recorded in the Coburn Survey Area 

 

 



Flora and Vegetation 

 

1. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

1. SUMMARY 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd was commissioned by URS Australia Pty Ltd on behalf of Gunson 

Resources Ltd to undertake a flora and vegetation study of a proposed mineral sand mining area and 

associated access roads on Coburn, Hamelin and Meadow Stations, near Shark Bay. The study was 

conducted via foot and vehicle traverses and through the establishment of 56 permanent vegetation plots. 

These plots were established in the various vegetation communities defined and mapped during surveys 

in August 2003 and April 2004 (Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd, 2004). Additional surveys were conducted 

during September 2004, to collect annual and short-lived ephemeral species following winter rainfall and 

in November 2004, to survey two extensions of the initial survey area and an additional access road.  

 

A total of 231 taxa (including subspecies and varieties) from 132 genera and 51 families were recorded 



within the survey area. Some taxa were not identified to the species level due to the paucity of flowering 

and fruiting specimens. The most common families recorded were Myrtaceae (27 taxa), Asteraceae (23 

taxa), Poaceae (19 taxa), Mimosaceae (17 taxa), Chenopodiaceae (15 taxa) and Proteaceae (14 taxa), a 

floral composition typical of the intermediate zone between the Southwestern and Eremaean Botanical 

Provinces. 

 

No plant taxa located in the surveys are gazetted as Declared Rare Flora pursuant to subsection (2) of 



section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950). No plant taxa listed as Threatened pursuant to 

Schedule 1 of the Environmental Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999) were located in the 

surveyed area.  Eucalyptus beardiana which is listed as a Declared Rare Flora pursuant to subsection (2) 

of section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) and as Endangered pursuant to Schedule 1 of the 

Environmental Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999) has been recorded previously within the 

survey area. Therefore it is critical that additional ground searching for Eucalyptus beardiana (R) is 

undertaken in the survey area prior to any clearing activities. 

 

Three Priority 2 species (Acacia subrigida, Eremophila occidens (ms) and Scholtzia sp. Folly Hill), five 



Priority 3 species (Acacia drepanophylla,  Grevillea rogersoniana, Grevillea stenostachya, Macarthuria 

intricata  and  Physopsis chrysophylla) and one Priority 4 species (Jacksonia dendrospinosa)  were 

recorded in the following plant communities in the survey area: 

 

Acacia subrigida (P2) – in plant Communities S1, S2, S3 and S5. 



 

Eremophila occidens (ms) (P2) – in plant Communities S1, S2 and S3. 

 

Scholtzia sp. Folly Hill (P2) – in plant Community S2.  



 

Acacia drepanophylla (P3) – in plant Communities E3, S7, S8 and S9. 

 

Grevillea rogersoniana (P3) – in plant Communities S1, S2 and S3. 



 

Grevillea stenostachya (P3) – in plant Communities E6 and S7. 

 

Macarthuria intricata (P3) – in plant Communities S2 and S10. 



 

Physopsis chrysophylla (P3) – in plant Communities S1, S2, S3 and S10. 

 

Jacksonia dendrospinosa (P4) – in plant Community S2. 



 

As there a range of Priority species that have been recorded either within the survey area or nearby it is 

critical that targeted searching for all of these species is undertaken in future field studies. 

 

Based on information available through the West Australian Herbarium (Department of Conservation and 



Land Management, 2005) several species recorded in the survey area represent extensions to their known 

range. These are Acacia rigens, Austrostipa macalpinei,  Daviesia divaricata subsp. ?lanulosa (ms), 



Dicrastylis soliparma, Grevillea acacioides, Grevillea stenostachya (P3)  and Trachymene coerulea 

subsp. leucopetala, as well as the introduced species Avellinia michelii. 



 

Some of the species present in the Coburn survey area are endemic to the fringes of Shark Bay. These 

include  Acacia drepanophylla (P3), Acacia galeata, Adenanthos acanthophyllus, Baeckea sp. Nanga 

(A.S. George 11346) (pn), Calothamnus formosus subsp. formosus, Conostylis candicans subsp. 



flavifolia, Eucalyptus roycei, Eucalyptus selachiana, Grevillea rogersoniana (P3), Lamarchea hakeifolia 

var. hakeifolia, Macarthuria intricata (P3), Malleostemon pedunculatus and Melaleuca eulobata

 


Flora and Vegetation 

 

2. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 



Other species occur at the fringes of their occurrence, either on the western edges of the Carnarvon 

Botanical District or as northern extensions from the Irwin Botanical District. The overlapping ranges of 

these species illustrate the significance of this area as a boundary between two botanical provinces. This 

unique feature of the Shark Bay Flora has also been highlighted in the surveys by Trudgen and Keighery 

(1995) and Gibson et al. (2000). 

 

Eighteen plant communities were defined and mapped during the surveys, comprising seven Eucalyptus 



Woodlands, ten Shrublands and one Mosaic Community. None of these plant communities are considered 

Threatened Ecological Communities pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Environmental Protection Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999) or according to English and Blyth (1997). 

 

Fourteen of the eighteen plant communities (E1, E2, E3, E4, E6, E7, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S10 and M1) 



described and mapped may be considered regionally significant, as they are endemic to the southern 

fringes of Shark Bay. Community S5 is particularly significant, as it is restricted to deep valleys, which 

are an unusual landform both locally and within the region.  

 

Several plant communities within the survey area are considered locally significant where Priority species 



have been recorded, including Communities E3, E6, S1, S2, S3, S5, S7, S8, S9 and S10. Several of the 

priority species dominate the communities S5, S8, S9 and S10. Based on current information the 

distribution of S10 appears to be restricted within the survey area. The Communities E4 and S4 are also 

locally significant as they support populations of Grevillea acacioides that occur as a range extension 

from previously recorded locations (based on the CALM FloraBase, 2005). The plant Communities S7, 

S8 and S9 are relatively restricted to calcareous soils in the eastern part of the survey area and are 

unlikely to be markedly influenced by the proposed development.

  

 



Three extensions of the existing survey area were mapped during April and November 2004. Three plant 

communities (S1, S2 and S3) were recorded in the extension areas and were identical in structure and 

species composition to those communities in the central part of the Coburn survey area.  

 

In the additional survey of the potential southern haul road conducted in November 2004, the plant 



communities S1, S2, S7, S9, E2, E3, E4, E6 and E7 were recorded. These were floristically equivalent to 

the communities recorded in previous surveys of the northern haul road and the main survey area.  

 

In general, the composition and pattern of the flora in the survey area is consistent with other surveys of 



the Shark Bay region by Trudgen and Keighery (1995) and Gibson et al. (2000). The major floristic 

boundary between the Southwestern and Eremaean Botanical Provinces that dissects the survey area is a 

defining feature of the flora. The boundary is imposed by a sharp climatic and soil gradient and is 

reflected by the diverse range and high endemism of the species and plant communities recorded in the 

present study.

 

2. INTRODUCTION 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd was commissioned by URS Australia Pty Ltd on behalf of Gunson 

Resources Ltd to undertake a Flora and Vegetation study of a proposed mineral sand mining area and 

associated proposed access roads on Coburn and Hamelin Stations. In August 2003, an extensive survey 

of the survey area was conducted to define the plant communities and to search for Rare or Priority Flora. 

In April 2004, 56 permanent plots where then established across the different plant communities to begin 

a potential long-term study of the Flora and Vegetation of the proposed mineral sand mine. In addition to 

the establishment of permanent plots, a survey of a southern extension of the initial survey area was also 

undertaken in April 2004. Further surveys were also conducted during September 2004, to collect annual 

and short-lived ephemeral species following winter rainfall and in November 2004, to survey two more 

extensions of the initial survey area and an additional access road. 

 

 

 



 

Flora and Vegetation 

 

3. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 



2.1 Location 

The survey area traverses Coburn Station in the south and Hamelin Station in the north, extending 

directly south of Hamelin Pool, near Shark Bay. The proposed southern access road also crosses Meadow 

Station. The western edge of the survey area is adjacent to the Shark Bay World Heritage Property. The 

survey area is approximately 38km long (from north to south) and ranges between 3 and 6km wide (from 

east to west). The two potential road corridors are 500m wide and extended for 40km to the North West 

Coastal Highway in the east.  

2.2 Climate 

The survey area occurs within the Irwin Botanical District, characterised by a Semi-Desert Mediterranean 

climate with an annual rainfall of 200-250mm and wet, mild winters and dry, hot summers (Beard, 1979). 

2.3 Declared 

Rare, 

Priority and Threatened Species 

Species of flora and fauna are defined as Declared Rare or Priority conservation status where their 

populations are restricted geographically or threatened by local processes.  The Department of 

Conservation and Land Management recognises these threats of extinction and consequently applies 

regulations towards population and species protection. 

 

Rare Flora species are gazetted under Subsection 2 of Section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act 



(1950) and therefore it is an offence to “take” or damage rare flora without Ministerial approval.  Section 

23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950-1980) defines “to take” as “… to gather, pick, cut, pull up, 

destroy, dig up, remove or injure the flora or to cause or permit the same to be done by any means. 

 

Priority Flora are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey 

(Priority One to Three) or require monitoring every 5-10 years (Priority Four).  Table 1 presents the 

definitions of Declared Rare and the four Priority ratings under the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) as 

extracted the West Australian Herbarium (2005a, 2005b). 

 


Flora and Vegetation 

 

4. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 

Table 1: 

Definition of Rare and Priority Flora Species (Department of Conservation 

and Land Management, 2005) 

 

Conservation 

Code 

Category 



Declared Rare Flora – Extant Taxa 

“Taxa which have been adequately searched for and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, 

in danger of extinction, or otherwise in need of special protection and have been gazetted as 

such.” 


P1 

Priority One – Poorly Known Taxa 

“Taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations which are under 

threat, either due to small population size, or being on lands under immediate threat. Such 

taxa are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further 

survey.” 

P2 

Priority Two – Poorly Known Taxa 

“Taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations, at least some of 

which are not believed to be under immediate threat (not currently endangered). Such taxa 

are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but urgently need further survey.” 



P3 

Priority Three – Poorly Known Taxa 

“Taxa which are known from several populations, and the taxa are not believed to be under 

immediate threat (ie. not currently endangered), either due to the number of known 

populations (generally >5), or known populations being large, and either widespread or 

protected. Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’ but need further 

survey.” 



P4 

Priority Four – Rare Taxa 

“Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst being rare 

(in Australia), are not currently threatened by any identifiable factors. These taxa require 

monitoring every 5-10 years.” 



 

 

Threats of extinction of species are also recognised at a Federal Government level and are categorised 



according to the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC Act), 1999. 

Categories of threatened species are summarised in Table 2. 



Flora and Vegetation 

 

5. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

Table 2: 

Categories of Threatened Flora Species (Environmental Protection and 

Biodiversity Conservation Act, 1999) 

 

 



Category  

Code 

Category 

Ex 

Extinct  

Taxa which at a particular time if, at that time, there is no reasonable doubt that the last 

member of the species has died. 

ExW 

Extinct in the Wild 

Taxa which is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised 

population well outside its past range; or it has not been recorded in its known and/or 

expected habitat, at appropriate seasons, anywhere in its past range, despite exhaustive 

surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form. 




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə