Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice Page 1 of 4 Advice to the Minister for the Environment and Heritage from the Threatened Species Scientific Committee



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Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice - Page 1 of 4 

 

Advice to the Minister for the Environment and Heritage from the Threatened Species 



Scientific Committee (the Committee) on Amendments to the list of Threatened Species 

under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) 

 

1.   Scientific name (common name)  



Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) 

 

2.   Description 

The Autumn Featherflower is a slender, spindly shrub growing to 1.5 metres high with small 

white to pink or purple feather flowers, showing from January to April. 

 

3.   National Context 

The Autumn Featherflower is endemic to Western Australia. It is known from four 

populations in and adjacent to the Stirling Range National Park, approximately 80 kilometres 

north-east of Albany. 

The species is not listed under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950

However, Western Australia continues to monitor the species for any change in conservation 

status. 

 

4.   How judged by the Committee in relation to the EPBC Act criteria. 

The Committee judges the species is not eligible for listing under the EPBC Act.  The 

justification against the criteria is as follows: 

 

Criterion 1 – It has undergone, is suspected to have undergone or is likely to undergo in 

the immediate future a very severe, severe or substantial reduction in numbers. 

The total population size of the Autumn Featherflower is approximately 150 100 mature 

individuals and 50 000 juveniles, known from four populations (CALM 2005). Three 

populations are located within the Stirling Range National Park and the fourth population 

occurs on private property and road reserve. The two largest populations of Autumn 

Featherflower, consisting of 150 000 plants, were recently discovered (one in March 1999 and 

the other in February 2004) at the south-east end of the Stirling Range National Park (CALM 

2005). 


Due a lack of historical survey information, there are insufficient data available to indicate 

past trends in the population size of the species.  

While Phytophthora cinnamomi

 

is a threatening process operating within the National Park, 



surveys carried out between 1999 and 2004 of known Autumn Featherflower populations 

found the plants were located within largely healthy habitat and in good condition. The 

species’ susceptibility to the disease is unknown, however, it is presumed to be low to 

moderate based on the susceptibility of other members of the genus (Brown et al 1998). 

In conclusion, there are insufficient data to determine whether there has been a past decline in 

the species and current evidence suggests that there is not likely to be a substantial decline in 

numbers in the immediate future. Therefore, the species is not eligible for listing under this 

criterion. 



 

Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice - Page 2 of 4 

 

 



Criterion 2 –Its geographic distribution is precarious for the survival of the species and 

is very restricted, restricted or limited. 

The Autumn Featherflower is known from four populations, with a total extent of occurrence 

estimated to be 60 km

2

 (CALM 2005). The two largest populations of Autumn Featherflower, 



consisting of 150 000 plants, were recently discovered (one in March 1999 and the other in 

February 2004) at the south-east end of the Stirling Range National Park. 

There is no known evidence to suggest the species has undergone a decline in extent of 

occurrence.  

As discussed under criterion 1,  Phytophthora cinnamomi

 

is a threatening process operating 



within the Stirling Range National Park, but is not currently impacting on known populations 

of Autumn Featherflower.  

One small population of the species, consisting of 80 plants and last surveyed in November 

2002, is located on private property and road reserve. This population is potentially subject to 

disturbance from road maintenance and weed invasion. However, no known threat is 

currently impacting on this population.  

Hence, while the geographic distribution of the Autumn Featherflower is very restricted, it is 

not precarious for the survival of the species. Therefore the species is not eligible for listing 

under this criterion. 

 

Criterion 3 – The estimated total number of mature individuals is limited to a particular 

degree and: (a) evidence suggests that the number will continue to decline at a 

particular rate; or (b) the number is likely to continue to decline and its geographic 

distribution is precarious for its survival. 

The total population size of the Autumn Featherflower is estimated to be 150 100 mature 

individuals and 50 100 juveniles (CALM 2005).  

As discussed under criterion 2, the geographic distribution of the Autumn Featherflower is 

very restricted, but is not precarious for the survival of the species. 

Therefore the species is not eligible for listing under this criterion. 

 

Criterion 4 – The estimated total number of mature individuals is extremely low, very 

low or low. 

There is estimated to be 150 100 mature individuals existing in four known populations of the 

species. Therefore the number of mature individuals is not  low, very low or extremely low. 

The species is not eligible for listing under this criterion. 

 

Criterion 5 - Probability of extinction in the wild 

There are no data available to assess the species against this criterion.  

 


 

Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice - Page 3 of 4 

 

5.   CONCLUSION 

The total population size of the Autumn Featherflower is estimated to be 150 100 mature 

individuals and 50 000 juveniles, known from four populations in or adjacent to the Stirling 

Range National Park.  

There is insufficient historical survey data to indicate a past decline in the population size of 

the species and current evidence suggests there is not likely to be a substantial decline in 

numbers in the immediate future. 

The geographic distribution is restricted, given that the area of occurrence is 60km

2

, however 



it is not precarious for its survival. 

In conclusion, the Autumn Featherflower does not meet any of the criteria for listing as 

threatened under the EPBC Act. 

 

6.   Recommendation 

The Committee recommends that the list referred to in section 178 of the EPBC Act be 

amended by deleting from the list in the endangered category:  



Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) 

 

 



 

Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice - Page 4 of 4 

 

Publications used to assess the nomination  

Brown, A., Marchant and Thomson-Dans (1998) Western Australia’s Threatened Flora. WA 

Department of Conservation and Land Management. 

CALM (2005) Records held in CALM’s Declared Flora Database and rare flora files. WA 

Department of Conservation and Land Management. 

Robinson, C. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany 

District. Wildlife management Program No 20. Department of Conservation and Land 



Management, Perth Western Australia. 

 

 


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