Virus-Specific Memory b lymphocytes Unique Requirements for Reactivation of



Yüklə 227.23 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix26.05.2017
ölçüsü227.23 Kb.
  1   2   3

of May 25, 2017.

This information is current as



Virus-Specific Memory B Lymphocytes

Unique Requirements for Reactivation of

Michael Mach and Thomas H. Winkler

Jasmin U. Horlitz, Nico van Rooijen, Heinrich Korner, 

Florian J. Weisel, Uwe K. Appelt, Andrea M. Schneider,

http://www.jimmunol.org/content/185/7/4011

doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1001540

August 2010;

2010; 185:4011-4021; Prepublished online 25



J Immunol 

Material

Supplementary

0.DC1

http://www.jimmunol.org/content/suppl/2010/08/25/jimmunol.100154

References

http://www.jimmunol.org/content/185/7/4011.full#ref-list-1

, 17 of which you can access for free at: 

cites 48 articles

This article 



Subscription

http://jimmunol.org/subscription

 is online at: 

The Journal of Immunology

Information about subscribing to 



Permissions

http://www.aai.org/About/Publications/JI/copyright.html

Submit copyright permission requests at: 

Email Alerts

http://jimmunol.org/alerts

Receive free email-alerts when new articles cite this article. Sign up at: 

Print ISSN: 0022-1767 Online ISSN: 1550-6606. 

Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2010 by The American Association of

1451 Rockville Pike, Suite 650, Rockville, MD 20852

The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.,

 is published twice each month by

The Journal of Immunology

 by guest on May 25, 2017

http://www.jimmunol.org/

Downloaded from 

 by guest on May 25, 2017

http://www.jimmunol.org/

Downloaded from 


The Journal of Immunology

Unique Requirements for Reactivation of Virus-Specific

Memory B Lymphocytes

Florian J. Weisel,* Uwe K. Appelt,

Andrea M. Schneider,* Jasmin U. Horlitz,*



Nico van Rooijen,

Heinrich Korner,



x

Michael Mach,

{

and Thomas H. Winkler*



,†

Memory B cells (MBCs) are rapidly activated upon Ag re-exposure in vivo, but the precise requirements for this process are still

elusive. To address these requirements, T cell-independent reactivation of MBCs against virus-like particles was analyzed. As few as

25 MBCs are sufficient for a measurable Ab response after adoptive transfer. We found that MBCs were reactivated upon antigenic

challenge to normal levels after depletion of macrophages, CD11c

+

dendritic cells, and matured follicular dendritic cells. Fur-



thermore, MBC responses were possible in TNF/lymphotoxin

a double-deficient mice after partial normalization of lymphoid

architecture by means of long-term reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow. Activation did not occur when chimeric mice,

which still lack all lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches, were splenectomized prior to MBC transfer. Together with our finding that

MBC responses are weak when Ag was administered within minutes after adoptive MBC transfer, these results strongly suggest

that MBCs have to occupy specific niches within secondary lymphoid tissue to become fully Ag-responsive. We provide clear

evidence that MBCs are not preferentially resident within the splenic marginal zones and show that impaired homing to lymphoid

follicles resulted in significantly diminished activation, suggesting that reactivation of MBCs occurred inside lymphoid follicles.

Furthermore, comparison of virus-specific MBC T cell-independent reactivation versus primary T cell-independent type II B cell

activation revealed unique requirements of MBC activation.

The Journal of Immunology, 2010, 185: 4011–4021.

I

mmunological memory, the ability to respond rapidly and



effectively to Ag upon re-exposure after initial encounter, is

the defining feature of adaptive immunity. Memory is an

emergent property that extends in increased precursor frequencies

of Ag-specific B and T cells, long-lived plasma cells (PCs), pre-

existing Abs, as well as memory lymphocytes with functional

properties different from those of their naive precursors (1, 2).

Memory B cells (MBCs) and long-lived PCs arise from germinal

center reactions and express somatically hypermutate Ig receptors

of switched isotypes (3), although it was recently demonstrated that

thymus-independent type II (TI-2) Ags can also generate MBCs

(4). Humoral immunity is maintained by either long-lived PCs,

which home to the bone marrow (BM) constitutively secreting Abs

(5), or nonsecreting resting MBCs that are rapidly reactivated upon

Ag re-encounter (6). It is still a matter of debate how longevity of

MBCs is achieved and to what extent they sustain Ab titers. Dif-

ferent concepts to explain persistence of Abs with a given speci-

ficity are presently discussed (7, 8).

We were interested in the reactivation requirements of MBCs,

which are largely undefined. Recently, we have shown that reac-

tivation of human CMV (hCMV)-specific murine MBCs can occur in

the absence of cognate or bystander T cell help (9). Interestingly, our

results indicated that homing to intact, compartmentalized sec-

ondary lymphoid tissue is required for proper T cell-independent

MBC responses (9). We established sorting of single Ag-specific

MBCs, thus enabling us to analyze the reactivation of these cells

qualitatively as well as quantitatively. We show that not only

T lymphocytes but also macrophages (Mfs), CD11c

+

dendritic



cells (DCs), and follicular DCs (FDCs) are not essential for the

reactivation of MBCs, and we provide evidence that reactivation of

MBCs takes place within follicles of secondary lymphoid organs.

Comparison of T cell-independent virus-specific MBC activation to

primary immune reactions against TI-2 Ags revealed unique re-

quirements of murine MBC activation.

Materials and Methods

Mice, BM transplantation, and splenectomy

C57BL/6 (B6) mice were obtained from Charles River Laboratories

(Sulzfeld, Germany). B6-IgH

a

congenic (B6.PL-Thy1a/CyJ) and B6-



TCR

2/2


mice were obtained from The Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor,

ME). B6-CD11c-diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR)/GFP transgenic (tg)

mice (10) were a gift from U. Schleicher (University of Erlangen). B6-TNF/

lymphotoxin a (LTa)

2/2

(11), Ly5.1 congenic B6 mice and B6-RAG1



2/2

mice (12) and all other strains of mice were maintained under specific

pathogen-free conditions and used between 8 and 12 wk of age. All

experiments were conducted in accordance with international guidelines for

animal care and use and in accordance with the guidelines of the Animal

Care and Use Committee of the Government of Bavaria and the institutional

guidelines of the University of Erlangen–Nuremberg.

For BM reconstitution, BM cells from donor mice were harvested by

flushing femurs and tibias with sterile PBS. BM cells (2–5

3 10


6

) were


*Hematopoiesis Unit, Department of Biology,

Nikolaus-Fiebiger Center for Molec-



ular Medicine, University Erlangen;

{

Institute for Clinical and Molecular Virology,



University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany;

Department of Molecular Cell



Biology, Free University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; and

x

Comparative Genomics



Centre, Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia

Received for publication May 10, 2010. Accepted for publication July 22, 2010.

This work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through

Sonderforschungsbereich 643 (to M.M. and T.H.W.).

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Thomas H. Winkler, Hematopoi-

esis Unit, Department of Biology, Nikolaus-Fiebiger Center for Molecular Medi-

cine, Glueckstrasse 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. E-mail address: uni-erlangen.de">twinkler@molmed.

uni-erlangen.de">uni-erlangen.de

The online version of this article contains supplemental material.

Abbreviations used in this paper: B6, C57BL/6; BM, bone marrow; CL, clodronate

liposome; DTR, diphtheria toxin receptor; DTx, diphtheria toxin; FDC, follicular

dendritic cell; FO, follicular; FSC, follicular stromal cell; gB, glycoprotein B; hCMV,

human CMV; LTa, lymphotoxin a; Mf, macrophage; MBC, memory B cell; MZ,

marginal zone; PC, plasma cell; PP, Peyer’s patch; RU, relative unit; tg, transgenic; TI-

2, thymus-independent type II; TNP, 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl; VLP, virus-like particle; wt,

wild-type.

Copyright

Ó 2010 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. 0022-1767/10/$16.00

www.jimmunol.org/cgi/doi/10.4049/jimmunol.1001540

 by guest on May 25, 2017

http://www.jimmunol.org/

Downloaded from 


injected into the tail veins of recipient mice within 24 h after lethal gamma

irradiation (11 Gy). Recipients were rested for at least 50 d.

For splenectomy, mice were anesthetized i.p. with Ketavet (100 mg/kg;

Pharmacia, Karlsruhe, Germany) and Rompun (20 mg/kg; Bayer Health-

Care, Leverkusen, Germany). The spleen was removed after appropriate

blood vessel ligation, and peritoneum and skin were closed in separate

layers using sterile absorbable sutures.

Ags, immunizations, and in vivo treatment

hCMV strain AD169 was propagated in primary human foreskin fibroblasts.

Dense bodies (noninfectious enveloped particles that mainly consist of tegu-

ment proteins contained in a complete viral envelope with all glycoproteins

embedded, referred to as virus-like particles [VLPs] throughout this work)

were purified from cell culture supernatant via glycerol-tartrate gradient

centrifugation as described (13). Highly purified, endotoxin-free, recombi-

nant hCMV-glycoprotein B (gB) was a gift from Sanofi Pasteur (Lyon,

France). Mice were immunized twice with 5–10 mg VLPs or soluble gB in

Imject Alum (Pierce, Rockford, IL) at intervals of 6 wk and with 2 mg VLPs

or gB in PBS i.v. 6 wk later. Mice were rested for at least 6 wk after the last

immunization. For analysis of TI-2 immune reactions, mice were i.p. injected

once with 15 mg of 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl (TNP)-80-Ficoll (Biosearch Tech-

nologies, Novato, CA) in PBS without adjuvant. To investigate the distri-

bution of blood-borne Ags, mice were injected with 1

3 10

8

fluorescein-



conjugated Escherichia coli (K-12 strain) BioParticles in PBS (Invitrogen,

Karlsruhe, Germany) 15 min prior to analysis. For depletion of Mfs or

CD11c

+

DCs (in CD11c-DTR/GFP tg animals), mice were repetitively



treated i.v. with 50 mg clodronate (clodronate was a gift of Roche Diag-

nostics, Mannheim, Germany; it was encapsulated in liposomes as described

in Ref. 14) in 200 ml PBS or i.p. with 4 ng/g bodyweight diphtheria toxin

(DTx; Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) in 200 ml PBS, respectively. Re-

location of B cells from the marginal zones (MZs) into the follicles was

achieved by repetitive i.p. treatment of mice with 2.5 mg/kg bodyweight

FTY720 (Cayman Chemical, Ann Arbor, MI) in DMSO. In vivo Ab labeling

was performed by i.v. injection of 2.5 mg PE-conjugated anti-Ly5.1 Ab

(clone A20; BD Biosciences, Heidelberg, Germany) in 200 ml PBS. To

impair B cell homing to lymphoid follicles, mice were i.v. injected with 200

mg anti-CXCL13 Ab (clone 143614; R&D Systems, Wiesbaden, Germany)

in PBS. GB was conjugated to biotin by the use of No-Weigh sulfo-NHS-

biotin (Pierce) followed by purification with Pall Nanosep centrifugal

devices with Omega membrane 30K (Sigma-Aldrich). Particularization

of gB-biotin on inert streptavidin microbeads was achieved by using

a mMACS streptavidin kit (Miltenyi Biotec, Bergisch Gladbach, Ger-

many) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Mouse and human

monoclonal anti-HCMV gB Abs generated in our laboratory (unpublished

data) were used to measure and equilibrate the amount of gB on beads and

VLPs by ELISA.

Flow cytometry, cell sorting, and adoptive transfer of

B lymphocytes

Spleens were harvested and, in case of DC analysis, digested in 5 ml Hank’s

buffer supplemented with 1 mg/ml collagenase D (Roche Diagnostics,

Mannheim, Germany) and 200 U/ml DNaseI (Roche Diagnostics) for 30 min

at 37˚C prior to single-cell suspension. After erythrocyte lysis (5 min in 0.15

M NH

4

Cl, 0.02 M HEPES, 0.1 mM EDTA) and FcgR blocking (5 mg/ml rat



anti-mouse CD16/CD32; clone 93, eBioscience, Frankfurt, Germany),

splenocytes were incubated in PBS, 2% FCS, 2 mM EDTA for 30 min at 4˚C

with varying combinations of the following Abs (if not listed otherwise, Abs

were obtained from BD Biosciences): rat anti-mouse CD19 (clone 1D3, PE-

or allophycocyanin-conjugated), rat anti-mouse IgG1 (clone A85-1, FITC-

conjugated), rat anti-mouse IgG2a (clone R19-15, FITC-conjugated), rat

anti-mouse IgG2b (clone R12-3, FITC-conjugated), rat anti-mouse CD11b

(clone M1/70, PE-conjugated), Armenian hamster anti-mouse CD11c

(clone N418, AF-647-conjugated; eBioscience), rat anti-mouse CD23 (clone

B3B4, PE- or biotin-conjugated), rat anti-mouse CD21 (clone 7G6, FITC-

conjugated), mouse anti-mouse Ly5.1 (clone A20, PE-conjugated), and

mouse anti-mouse Ly5.2 (clone 104, FITC-conjugated). Cells were washed

once in PBS, 2% FCS, 2 mM EDTA between incubation steps with listed

primary Abs and streptavidin-conjugated PerCP to detect biotinylated pri-

mary Abs. Expression of cell surface markers was analyzed using a FACS-

Calibur running CellQuest software (BD Biosciences), with data analysis

performed using FlowJo (Tree Star, Ashland, OR). For adoptive transfer,

single-cell suspensions of splenocytes were depleted of T cells by incubation

with supernatants of rat IgM anti-mouse CD4 (174.2)- and rat IgM anti-

mouse CD8 (31-68.1)-producing cell lines (15) and the addition of Low-

Tox rabbit complement (Cedarlane Laboratories, Hornby, Ontario, Canada)

followed by Ficoll gradient purification. CD19

+

B lymphocytes were further



enriched by MACS (Miltenyi Biotec). In general, a purity $99.8% was

achieved by this procedure. B cells were either adoptively transferred into the

tail vein of recipient mice or further purified by two rounds of cell sorting

using a MoFlo cell sorter (Dako, Glostrup, Denmark) to isolate IgG

+

gB-binding MBCs (Supplemental Fig. 1). Therefore, 5



3 10

7

B cells/ml were



stained with anti-CD19 (PE-conjugated), anti-IgG1 (FITC-conjugated), anti-

IgG2a (FITC-conjugated), and anti-IgG2b (FITC-conjugated) and were ex-

posed to 5 mg/ml gB, which was fluorescently labeled by the use of a Cy5 Ab

labeling kit (Amersham Biosciences, Freiburg, Germany) according to the

manufacturer’s instructions.

Detection of specific Abs

Sera were analyzed by ELISA to measure virus-specific IgG Abs. Soluble

gB (1 mg/ml) was used throughout this work as coating Ag for the de-

tection of specific Abs to yield high specifity and overcome limited sen-

sitivity because of insufficient Ag density on VLPs. Sera were applied as

2-fold serial dilutions (ranging from 1/50 to 1/51,200) in PBS, 2% FCS,

0.05% Tween 20 (Sigma-Aldrich) and were compared with a 2-fold di-

lution series (ranging from 1 mg/ml to 1 ng/ml) of a murine, gB-specific

mAb (mAb 27-287; a gift from W. Britt, Birmingham, AL), which was

included on each individual ELISA plate to generate standard curves with

the value 1000 relative units (RUs) allotted. For detection of allotype-

specific gB-specific serum IgG1

a/b


and IgG2a

a/b


, samples were compared

with sera from VLP hyperimmune B6 and IgH

a

congenic B6 mice, which



were included on each individual ELISA plate to generate standard curves

with the value 1000 RUs allotted. These hyperimmune sera were equili-

brated for gB-specific IgG1 or IgG2a titers, respectively. Equilibration was

achieved by the use of subclass-specific, biotinylated secondary Abs (BD

Biosciences) and HRP-coupled streptavidin (Amersham Biosciences). De-

termination of allotype-specific serum IgG was also performed by the use

of allotype-specific, biotinylated secondary Abs (BD Biosciences). GB-

specific serum IgG was detected by Fcg-specific goat anti-mouse IgG Abs

(Dianova, Hamburg, Germany) coupled with HRP. For the detection of

TNP-specific Ab titers, ELISA plates were coated with 10 mg/ml TNP

14

-

BSA (Biosearch Technologies), and serial serum dilutions were compared



with standard curves generated from sera of TNP-Ficoll immune wild-type

(wt) mice. Sera from naive mice served as control in all experiments,

and resulting RUs were depicted as hatched areas in the graphs if the

RUs were


.1. Data presentation was performed with GraphPad Prism

(GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA), and results of unpaired Student t

tests were shown as comparisons between indicated experimental groups:

pp , 0.05; ppp , 0.01; pppp , 0.001.

Immunofluorescence microscopy

Spleens were embedded in Tissue-Tek OCT compound (Sakura Finetek,

Torrance, CA) and stored at

280˚C. Cryostat sections (9 mm thick) were

thawed on SuperFrost Plus slides (Menzel Gla¨ser, Braunschweig, Ger-

many), air dried, fixed for 10 min in acetone at

220˚C, and outlined with

a liquid repellent slide marker pen (Science Services, Munich, Germany).

After rehydration in PBS for 5 min, nonspecific binding sites were blocked

for 30 min at room temperature with PBS, 10% FCS, 0,1% BSA, 2% rat

serum (eBioscience), and 5 mg/ml rat anti-mouse CD16/CD32 (clone 93;

eBioscience) Abs. Cryosections were incubated in PBS, 2% FCS, 0.05%

Tween 20 for 30 min at room temperature in the dark with varying com-

binations of the following Abs (if not listed otherwise, Abs were obtained

from BD Biosciences): polyclonal goat anti-mouse IgM (FITC-conjugated;

Dianova), rat anti-mouse IgD (clone 11-26c, biotin-conjugated; eBio-

science), rabbit anti-mouse pan-laminin (455, unconjugated; a gift from

L. Sorokin, Muenster University), rat anti-mouse metallophilic Mf (clone

MOMA-1, biotin-conjugated; BMA, Augst, Switzerland), rat anti-mouse

MZ Mf (clone ER-TR9, biotin-conjugated; Acris Antibodies, Hidden-

hausen, Germany), rat anti-mouse B220 (clone RA3-6B2, biotin- or FITC-

conjugated), mouse anti-mouse CD157 (clone BP-3, PE-conjugated), rat

anti-mouse IgG1 (clone A85-1, FITC-conjugated), rat anti-mouse IgG2a

(clone R19-15, FITC-conjugated), rat anti-mouse IgG2b (clone R12-3,

FITC-conjugated), rat anti-mouse CD4 (clone RM4-5, AF488-conjugated;

Caltag Laboratories, Hamburg, Germany), rat anti-mouse CD8 (clone 5H10,

AF488-conjugated; Caltag Laboratories), and rat anti-mouse MAdCAM-1

(clone MECA-89, biotin-conjugated). Cryosections were washed for 10 min

in PBS, 0.05% Tween 20 twice between incubation steps with depicted

primary and secondary donkey anti-rabbit IgG (Cy3- or Cy5-conjugated;

Dianova) Abs to detect pan-laminin or streptavidin-conjugated Cy3 (Amer-

sham Biosciences) to detect biotinylated primary Abs. Slides were mounted

in the anti-fading reagent Mowiol and sections were analyzed using an im-

munofluorescence microscope (Axioplan 2; Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany)

equipped with a high-sensitivity grayscale digital camera (OpenLab imaging

4012


REQUIREMENTS FOR VIRUS-SPECIFIC MEMORY B CELL ACTIVATION

 by guest on May 25, 2017

http://www.jimmunol.org/

Downloaded from 



system; Improvision, Lexington, MA). Separate images were taken for each

section, analyzed, and merged afterward.

Results

Frequency of virus-specific MBCs and quantitative analysis of



secondary immune response

Noninfectious enveloped hCMV particles, referred to as VLPs in

this study, were chosen as immunizing Ag to generate and study

virus-specific MBCs. To generate hCMV-specific MBCs, B6 mice

were immunized three times and rested for at least 6 wk after the

last immunization. Throughout this work hCMV gB was used for

the detection of virus-specific MBC Ab responses, as this Ab

specificity is immunodominant in mice (9). We were interested to

know how many MBCs are necessary to obtain a measurable gB

Ab response in adoptive transfer experiments. Toward this end,

isotype-switched (IgG

+

) CD19



+

B cells binding to fluorescently

labeled gB were isolated by cell sorting, and defined cell numbers

were adoptively transferred into individual RAG1

2/2

mice (Sup-



plemental Fig. 1). Challenge with VLPs resulted in strong gB-

specific serum IgG in RAG1

2/2

recipients, receiving as few as 25



gB-specific MBCs (Fig. 1), demonstrating the immense immuno-

logical power of MBCs.

Homing of MBCs to specific niches within secondary lymphoid

tissue is required for T cell-independent reactivation

Previous findings of our group suggested that MBCs need to mi-

grate to specific lymphoid compartments for strong T cell-

independent activation by recurrent Ag (9). As depicted in Fig. 2A,

MBCs are not fully responsive to Ag challenge within the first few

hours after adoptive B cell transfer. Only weak gB-specific serum

IgG titers, indicating suboptimal MBC reactivation, were detected in

recipient mice when Ag was administered within minutes after

adoptive B cell transfer. Strongest serum IgG titers were obtained

when VLPs were injected between 24 h and 7 d after MBC transfer.

Secondary application of Ag led to significant increase in serum

IgG titers of recipients that received the first Ag challenge simulta-

neously with B cell transfer, indicating that MBCs were not fully

responsive to the first challenge but survived at least 14 d and could

readily be reactivated. Together with our findings that MBCs

cannot be reactivated in TNF/LTa

2/2


recipients (Fig. 2B) (9),

which display complex immune abnormalities including disorga-

nization of lymphoid tissue (11), these observations point to the




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə