Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

75

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required over the known range of occurrence to determine the full extent of

populations and numbers of plants.

References

McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1995).

Illustration by M. Pieroni.


76

Grevillea humifusa P.Olde & N.Marriott

PROTEACEAE

[

Grevillea spEragilga (P.Olde 9196) [aff. preissii]]

A prostrate, lignotuberous shrub with trailing stems to 3 m long.  The branchlets are angular and

pilose with long white hairs.  The leaves are twice divided, the upper surface with long, soft hairs.

The flowers are grouped in a one-sided short head.  Each flower is hairless on the outside but

hairy inside.  The perianth is pink to pale red with a cream limb.  The pistil is glabrous with an

oblique pollen presenter.  There are strong basal ridges on the fruit.

This taxon is common in cultivation under the name 

Grevillea thelemanniana prostrate form.

Flowering Period:  May, July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known only from east of Jurien Bay in one road reserve population which extends back onto

private property.

Grows in brown, gravelly clay loam on lower hill slopes in woodland of 



Eucalyptus wandoo and

E. loxophleba with tall shrubs of Viminaria juncea and low shrubs, including Acacia reflexa and

Scaevola glanduligera.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire


Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. E of Jurien

D

Shire Road



Reserve, Private

15.5.1994

100+

Some plants on road



reserve dead, possibly

due to drought.



Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from seed or lignotuber.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that road markers are in place.

-  Maintain liaison with shire and landowner.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



77

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Elliot and Jones (1980-1990), Olde and Marriott (1995).



78

Grevillea murex McGill.

PROTEACEAE

An upright, much-branched shrub 1-2 m tall with somewhat hairy branchlets.  The leaves are 8-

10 mm long and have stalks to 1.5 mm long.  They are divided into 4-5 linear to oblong lobes

with blunt tips.  The flower heads are dome-shaped, at the ends of the branches, 1-2 cm long and

ca. 2 cm across.  The flowers are cream to yellow in colour, hairless on the outside and ca. 3 mm

long, with the pistil 9-10 mm long, the ovary glabrous and the pollen presenter oblique and

almost flat.  The fruits are oblong to ellipsoid, 9-13 mm long, with thick coats and covered with

irregular spiny protuberances to 2.5 mm high.  These give the fruit the appearance of a murex

shell.


Related to 

Grevillea crithmifolia but differs in the hairy branchlets, smaller leaves, flat torus and

seed pod with a hard coat with conspicuous irregular projections.



Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Moora District in a restricted area over 6 km north-east of Arrino but also occurs 8

km further north in the Geraldton District north-east of Yandanooka.

Grows in open York gum woodland over open low scrub with grasses and herbs on lateritic

gravel and brown clay loam or red clayey sand on gentle lower valley slopes or flat areas.

Associated species include 



Eucalyptus loxophleba, Allocasuarina campestris, Calothamnus and

Melaleuca species.

The population east of Yandanooka is of ca. 50 plants.  All populations are on narrow road

reserves, disturbed and with weed infestation.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire


Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  NE of Arrino,

Drew Road

TS

MRWA Road



Reserve, Private

24.9.1990

20

Partly disturbed



2.  NE of Arrino,

Bligh Road

TS

Shire Road Reserve 24.9.1990



150 est.

Partly disturbed

with weed

infestation



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



79

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that both populations are marked.

-  Maintain liaison with Shire and MRWA.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required on conservation reserves and other remnant vegetation in the area.



References

McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1995).



80

Grevillea pinifolia Meisn.

PROTEACEAE

Pine-leaved Grevillea

An erect, much-branched shrub to 0.6 m high with slightly hairy branchlets.  The leaves are erect

and rather crowded, simple and entire, linear with a minute point, subterete with a lateral groove

along each side, the surface smooth.  They are 2.5-5 cm long, 0.5-0.7 mm wide.  The flowers are

in umbel-like 1-4 flowered racemes which are axillary and stalkless, ca. 1 cm long.  The flowers

are bright red in colour with the perianth villous on the outside and partly within.  The pistil is

7.5-8.5 mm long and most of the style is concealed by the perianth at anthesis.  The nectary is U-

V shaped, reniform or pulvinate, enclosed within the torus or protruding less than 1 mm laterally

beyond the rim.  The stipe of the ovary is 1.6-1.9 mm long, the ovary is villous and the style is

villous at the base, with short hairs along most of the style.  The fruits are not known.



Flowering Period:  July-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded between Coorow, Miling and Bindi Bindi on the eastern side of the Moora

District and in the Eneabba area and further east at Wubin in the Merredin District.  However, the

most recent collection in the Western Australian Herbarium was made in 1972 and the species

was not searched for during the survey as it is a recent addition to the Priority Flora List.  It has

been photographed more recently (Olde and Marriott 1995).

Grows in scrub on lateritic rises in yellow sand or sandy gravel in scrub, sometimes with a few

emergent trees.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.*Coorow

Co

-



14.9.1932

-

-



2.*E of Bindi Bindi

Mo

-



12.8.1972

-

-



3.*Between Miling and Pithara -

-

8.7.1931



-

-

4.*N of Miling



-

-

8. 7.1931



-

-

5.*Eneabba area



-

-

20.7.1971 KP



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from seed.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



81

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Survey is required throughout the range of the species in the Moora and Merredin Districts.



References

Bentham (1870), McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1995).



82

Grevillea tenuiloba C.A.Gardner

PROTEACEAE

A low, spreading shrub to 0.6 m, with erect branches.  The leaves are divided into 5-7 segments

which are narrow-linear with sharp points.  The leaf margins are smoothly rolled back concealing

the lower surface and appearing doubly-grooved beneath.  The leaf lobes are up to 2.5 cm long.

The flower heads are terminal, erect or irregularly curved, simple or once-branched and rather

dense.  They are pendant or lie on the ground around the plant.  The flowers are orange in colour

with pedicels 2-5 mm long, the perianth to 1 cm long.  The outside of the perianth has an

indumentum more sparse towards the almost hairless limb and the inner surface is glabrous.  The

torus is very oblique.  The pistil is 23-34 mm long, the ovary with a short stipe and is somewhat

hairy, the hairs extending for ca. 4 mm up the style.  The pollen presenter is oblique and broadly

conical.  The fruit are ca. 1 cm long and hairy.

This species is closely related to 

Grevillea erectiloba but differs in the smaller leaves and flowers,

glabrous style and the ovary, which is almost sessile.  The leaf segments are flattened, not terete

and are rigidly divaricate.

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species was collected from near Dandaragan in the Moora District by Gardner in 1932.  A

more recent collection from the Irwin River may have been made within the District but there is

no precise location information.

Has also been recorded from the Wongan Hills to Jibberding area in the Merredin District, and in

the Pindar to Tardun and Morawa to Mullewa areas in the Geraldton District where it is recorded

from a nature reserve.

In the Kirwan area it has been recorded growing in sand associated with granite outcrops.  In the

Morawa-Mullewa area it grows near granite rocks in red clay-loam, in heath with dominant

species of Myrtaceae.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*Near Dandaragan

D

-

9.1932



-

-

2.*Irwin River, N Moora



-

-

1.9.1982



-

-

Response to Disturbance

At a population in the Geraldton District, it was observed that many young plants (seedlings)

were growing in an area which had been disturbed a few years previously.  It is killed by fire and

regenerates from seed (Olde and Marriott 1995).


83

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Gardner (1934), McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1995).



84

Grevillea thyrsoides Meisn. subsp. pustulata P.Olde & N.Marriott

PROTEACEAE

A low diffuse shrub to 60 cm tall with the branches and flowers often prostrate.  The leaves are

pinnately compound, stiff and mostly less than 5 cm long, 2.5-4 cm with shorter, more closely

aligned lobes than those of the typical subspecies, which are 9-32 mm long.  The margins of the

leaf lobes are rolled back.  There is a basal pimple-like protuberance on the underside of the leaf

lobes at the base.  The floral bracts are 2-5.3 mm long, shorter than those of the typical

subspecies.  The flowering heads are 2.5-11 cm long, terminal on trailing peduncles.  The flowers

are pink, dull red or crimson in colour, the perianth with hairs on the outside and longitudinally

ribbed, hairless on the inside, 7-8 mm long.  The pistil has spreading hairs and is 24-33 mm long,

with a stipe.  The style is curved with an oblique pollen presenter.

McGillivray (1993) distinguishes two forms of 



Grevillea thyrsoides, a longer-leaved form and a

shorter-leaved form, in which the leaf lobes of the former are also spreading rather than closely

aligned.  Olde and Marriott (1993) recognise these forms as subspecies on the basis of length of

leaf lobes, the presence of the protuberance on the underside of the shorter-leaved form and the

disjunct distribution of the two forms.

Flowering Period:  All year

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This subspecies occurs in the Moora District between Coorow and Watheroo, whereas the typical

subspecies is found further to the west between Badgingarra and Jurien Bay.  It has been reported

to have been found recently at Gunyidi (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Grows in sandy gravel, loam or quartzite soil, in low heath and mallee shrubland.

This taxon was not surveyed as it was not included in the Reserve List until 1994.  Olde and

Marriott (1995) state that it survives in a largely cleared area mainly on road reserves. 

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Gunyidi

Co

-

29.7.1980



-

-

2.* Coorow



Co

-

10.8.1949



-

-

3.* Arra Hill



Co

-

3.9.1987



-

-

4.* N of Marchagee



Co

-

4.5.1970



-

-

5.* S of Marchagee



-

-

31.8.1965



-

-

6.* Watheroo



-

-

12.1934



-

-

7.* N of Marchagee



Co

-

12.7.1963



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from seed.


85

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Survey for this subspecies is required, particularly on reserves between Coorow and

Watheroo.

References

McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1993, 1995).



86

Haloragis foliosa Benth.

HALORAGACEAE

A perennial herb or subshrub, rounded and multistemmed, to 50 cm tall, the stems woody at the

base and with a taproot.  The plant is rough to the touch, with curved 2-4 celled hairs, 0.2-0.4 mm

long.  The leaves are alternate, sessile, narrowly lanceolate to narrowly ovate, serrate mainly in

the upper part.  They are bright green in colour, 3-4.5 cm long, 0.2-0.4 cm wide. 

The flowers are grouped 1-3 in the axils of the upper leaves and primary bracts.  The secondary

bracts are fleshy and keeled.  The four sepals do not exceed the four petals in the mature flower.

They are ovate, to 1.9 mm long, 1.2 mm wide.  The petals are hooded and keeled, to 3.2 mm long,

1.3 mm wide.  There are 8 stamens and four clubbed styles.  The fruit is an indehiscent oblong

nut, to 1.8 mm long, four-angled with narrow wings on the angles.  It is 4-locular with one seed

per locule.

This species is closely related to 

Haloragus acutangula but differs in the sepals which are larger

and subcordate, not deltoid in shape, and in the secondary bracts, which are fleshy and keeled, not

membranous and without a midrib.

Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species is known from two populations south of Dongara in approximately the same

locations as earlier populations were found in 1974.  Another population occurs near Cervantes

ca. 100 km further south.  These populations all occur on coastal limestone.  The species has not

been collected apart from at these populations except for James Drummond’s collection made

between the Moore and Murchison Rivers and a collection from Winchester on the eastern side of

the District in 1968.  That area was searched but the population was not refound.  As it was

recorded from the railway reserve it may possibly have been an introduction from a coastal area.

In 1991 and 1992 this species was found at ten locations but was found to be common at only one

of these.  These ranged from Illawong to south of Cervantes and occurred in two nature reserves

and a national park (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Grows in shallow white or grey to yellow sand or brown loam over limestone in low coastal

heath.  Associated species include 

Acacia rostellifera, Melaleuca huegelii and M. acerosa.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. Near Cliff Head,

south of Dongara

I

Shire Road Reserve 6.1.1992



50 est.

Good, plants

growing on graded

road edge

2. Near Illawong,

south of Dongara

Ca

Shire Road Reserve 30.4.1992



200+

Good, plants

growing on graded

road edge



87

3.*ENE of Cervantes D

Nature Reserve

29.10.1991

-

-

4.*Winchester



Ca

Railway Reserve

10.1968

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Two recently surveyed populations were found on scraped road edges with little other vegetation.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road markers are in place at populations 1 and 2.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind population 3 and survey fully, and to survey

populations recorded in 1991-1992.

References

Orchard (1975, 1977, 1990).



88

Halosarcia koobabbiensis Paul G.Wilson ms

CHENOPODIACEAE

[

Halosarcia sp. Coorow (P.G.Wilson 12750)]

A perennial plant to 20 cm high, with erect branches which are reclining at the bases.  The

segments (articles) are large, ca. 8 mm long, light green and glaucous.  The flowering spikes are

terminal, with up to 10 articles, and the flowers are conspicuous.  The fruiting perianth is dry and

papery.  The seed is broad ovoid in shape, compressed and somewhat corrugate in a concentric

pattern.  It is reddish-brown in colour.

The distinguishing features of this species include the habit, shape of the articles and colour and

corrugations on the seed.  This species is part of the



 Halosarcia pergranulata complex, in which

there appear to be other new taxa and which is in need of revision (P.G. Wilson, personal

communication).

Flowering Period:  October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from one location to the south-east of Coorow.

Occurs on the upper margins of a salt lake on yellow clayey sand, growing as the dominant

species, associated with 



H. halocnemoides, H. lylei, Melaleuca uncinata and Gunniopsis sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SE of Coorow

Co

Private


16.10.1991

900 est.


Undisturbe

d

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Maintain liaison with landowners.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

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