Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required particularly to refind and survey fully, the known populations.



References

120

Briggs and Leigh (1988).



121

Rumex drummondii Meisn.

POLYGONACEAE



Rumex drummondii was collected by Drummond from “Swan River” between 1837 and 1852,

and by Oldfield at Kalgan River near Albany in the mid 1800s.  A third collection was made at

Gingin in 1938.  There is also a collection made from between Kalannie and Kulja (in the

Merredin District) in 1948 and another possibly from this area at Burekup (possibly Burakin)

made in 1924.  The species was presumed extinct until 1991 when a population was rediscovered

at Regans Ford during the course of research on the biological control of weeds related to 



R.

drummondii.  Subsequent survey work resulted in the discovery of eleven more populations in the

Kalgan River to Manypeaks area, two of which are on a nature reserve.



R. drummondii is an erect, terrestrial, perennial plant 60-90 cm tall with the stems branched in the

upper half forming an open panicle.  The basal leaves have stalks equalling the lamina in length.

They are oblong-lanceolate in shape with a truncate base, to 10 cm long and 2 cm broad, whilst

the upper stem leaves have shorter stalks and are narrower and more acute.  The flowers are in

distant whorls of 8-12 flowers.  The fruits are on pedicels two or three times as long as the valve.

The valves of the fruit are oblong, tongue-shaped with a prolonged apex which is recurved but

not hooked.  They are up to 4.5 mm long, 1.5-2 mm broad, with 2-3 straight to arcuate teeth on

either side, the upper one pointing forward.  The central nerve of the valve has a callosity near the

base.

Fruiting Period: Fruiting from mid October with mature fruits in November in the Moora

District.  Fruiting elsewhere between October and January.



Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

One population has been found in the Moora District on the southern boundary at Regans Ford. 

The species occurs in winter-wet depressions, usually in open areas where there has been soil

disturbance and in positions where the plant would be submerged for part of the year.  It was

found associated with

 R. crispus and other Rumex species in all populations and growing on

clayey loam soil at Regans Ford in open low woodland of 



Eucalyptus rudis with a ground flora of

introduced grasses and 



Watsonia sp.  Populations from further east may occur in a different

habitat to those from further west and south.  It is possible that this species is introduced from

eastern Australia as is also the case with the other two native species, 

R. brownii and R. dumosus

(Rechinger 1984).  This may explain the widely separated localities in which the species has been

found and its association with disturbed areas.

The species is now known from a total of twelve populations of ca. 350 mature plants.  Two

populations with 60+ plants are located on a nature reserve, the others on road verges or private

land.  The population at Regans Ford is located on a shire reserve and two of the populations in

the Albany District with a total of 60+ plants are on a nature reserve.  All other populations occur

on road verges or private land.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition


122

1.  Regans Ford

G

?Shire Reserve



18.11.1992

2

Population in dense



stand of 

Watsonia

sp.


Response to Disturbance

May be favoured by soil disturbance, several populations occurring in disturbed areas.

Occurs in dense stand of 

Watsonia sp. at Regans Ford and the population appeared to be

declining.  Other populations occur amongst introduced grasses and seem to be able to withstand

some weed invasion.

Appears to be very susceptible to grazing.

Usually occurs in open areas, but some populations are within open woodland.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in suitable habitat on conservation areas in the areas of

known occurrence and in the Regans Ford to Gingin area and Kalannie to Kulja area where

the species has not been found recently.



References

Rechinger (1984), Scott and Yeoh (1995).



123

Scaevola eneabba Carolin

GOODENIACEAE

This species was described by Carolin in 1990 from a collection made in 1964.  At that time this

was the only collection of the species known.  Subsequently another specimen has been identified

as 

Scaevola eneabba.  This was collected in February 1968 by Demarz and provides information

on the flower colour, habit and habitat of the species.



S. eneabba is an erect, shrubby plant with bristly hairs, and is loose and spreading in habit.  It

grows to about 60 cm tall.  The leaves are sessile, linear to oblanceolate, entire and thick, up to 30

mm long and 2 mm wide.  The flowers are in terminal spikes to 25 mm long, with lanceolate

bracts to 8 mm long, with long marginal bristles.  The sepals are 1 mm long, broadly triangular

and joined at the base.  The corolla is ca. 9 mm long, with hairs on the outside which are long,

stiff and brownish-yellow towards the top.  There are short hairs on the inside on the lobes and

throat.  The corolla is white to pink in colour and is divided into five flat, winged lobes  The tube

is split open, exposing the indusium and giving the flower a fan shape.  There are narrow lobes on

the edges of the corolla lobes known as barbulae which have papillae at the apex.  The ovary is

densely covered with long white hairs and has two locules.  The fruit is not known.



Flowering Period:  December and February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species has been recorded from two localities, both of which are imprecisely recorded.

However, they are both in the Eneabba area.

Has been recorded only as growing in sand heath.

Although several likely areas for the previous collections of this species have been searched, it

has not been refound. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Turn-off to Greenhead

from Eneabba

Co

-



21.2.1968

-

-



2.* Ca. 65 km from Eneabba -

-

15.10.1964



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

124

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Urgently requires further survey, particularly in the Eneabba to Greenhead area.



References

Carolin (1990b, 1992).



125

Schoenus andrewsii W.Fitzg.

CYPERACEAE

A tufted perennial herb to 35 cm tall, with strongly ribbed, resinous, scabrous stems which are

terete, yellow-green, up to 1 mm wide.  There are small leaves at the base with shiny, red-black

sheaths.  The flowers are grouped in a narrow panicle, to 6 cm long.  There are one or two pale

brown spikelets in each sheathing bract.  Each spikelet is slightly resinous, the lower with a short

stalk, and two flowers in each.  The glumes are ciliate.  There are three stamens and the style has

three plumose stigmatic lobes.  The nut is brown, three-angled and tuberculate.



Flowering Period:  December-February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from Kenwick in the metropolitan area  north to Kalbarri in the Geraldton District.  In the

Moora District the species has been recorded from west of Eneabba and Carnamah.

It grows in winter wet areas, in grey sand over gravelly loam, or sandy black clay, in dwarf scrub

over low heath.

The species was not found during this survey but the late flowering period and inconspicuous

habit of the plant may have contributed to this.  However the species has been found recently on

one nature reserve on the southern boundary of the District and was found in 1979 in another area

which has recently been gazetted as a nature reserve where it may still occur.  It has also been

recorded from the Kalbarri National Park.  Further survey is required in the District and also in

the Geraldton District before its conservation status can be assessed.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*W of Lake Indoon

Ca

VCL


8.9.1979

Common-WH

-

2. SW of Eneabba



Ca

-

12.1991



-

-

3.*W of Carnamah



-

-

8.2.1954



-

-

4. Mogumber



VP

Nature Reserve

22.11.1996

Uncommon


-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

126

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind populations 1-3 and complete full surveys. 



References

Fitzgerald (1903), Kelly 



et al. (1993), Marchant et al. (1987).

127

Stylidium drummondianum Lowrie & Carlquist

STYLIDIACEAE

This species was first collected in 1980 but was not described until 1990, and is known from few

collections.



Stylidium drummondianum is a perennial herb with short, nodose stems.  The leaves are in basal

rosettes, each leaf linear in shape, silvery-green in colour, with an incurved bristle-like tip, a

membranous ridge on the underside and minutely serrate margins.  They are 1-1.5 cm long, 2 mm

wide.  The flower heads are 5-10 cm tall, with short glandular hairs covering the inflorescences,

pedicels, ovaries and calyx lobes.  The flowers are orientated vertically, the corolla is pink to

purple with the lobes marked red at the bases and the throat yellow.  The lobes are elliptic, 4 mm

long, 2.5-2.7 mm wide.  There are four very small throat appendages, two of which are closely

paired.  The labellum is orbicular, with a pair of narrow appendages at the base.

This species is related to a group of species including 

S. hispidum, S. miniatum, S. piliferum and

S. pubigerum.  It differs in the nodose stems, leaf ridges, serrate leaf margins, glandular hairs on

the inflorescence, vertical orientation of the flowers and three small throat appendages, one being

bilobed.

Flowering Period:  September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been collected from two localities in the north of the Moora District from south-east of

Dongara and north-west of Three Springs, ca. 40 km apart.

It has been recorded growing on grey sand in a drainage line, in low open heath with occasional



Eucalyptus todtiana in the westerly site, and in gravelly lateritic soils with Dryandra hewardiana

and 


Allocasuarina helmsii at the more easterly locality.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  NW of Three Springs

TS

-

22.9.1990



-

-

1.* S of Mount Adams



I

-

10.9.1980



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



128

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to refind and survey populations 1 and 2 and to find further

populations.

References

Lowrie and Carlquist (1991).

Illustration by A. Lowrie.


129

Stylidium pseudocaespitosum Mildbr.

STYLIDIACEAE



Stylidium pseudocaespitosum is a perennial plant with the lower stems thickened and scaly with

the remains of the old persistent leaf bases.  The leaves are finely scabrous with very short, non-

glandular hairs and the basal leaves are loosely rosetted, erect and narrow-linear, with short, non-

glandular hairs on the margins.  They are 2-5 cm long, ca. 2 mm wide.  The flowers are in a

simple raceme on a scape with appressed bracts.  The calyx lobes are free and obtuse.  The

flowers are white, striped with dark purple, and the corolla lobes are almost equal, oval in shape,

2-4 mm long and ca. 2 mm broad.  There are very short, slender throat appendages which are

irregularly triangular in shape and membranous.  The labellum is small and pointed with two

small appendages.

Flowering Period:  September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Two collections made in 1901 and 1962 appear to have been made from east of Bookarra, north

of Dongara which is now in the Geraldton District.  Another made from south of Dongara in 1969

is within the Moora District but this population has not been refound.  The species has been

collected from three other locations during the 1960s in the Geraldton District.  At one location

all plants have been destroyed recently during firebreak construction.  The second population

consists of only two plants.  These populations are located east of Walkaway.  A third locality

further east has not yet been searched.

The species grows in deep, pale yellow sand.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Dongara

-

-

7.9.1969



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

130

-  Further survey work is urgently required, particularly in the areas south of Dongara in the

Moora District and north of the Casuarinas in the Geraldton District where the species has

been recorded previously but not recently refound.



References

Erickson (1981), Grieve and Blackall (1982), Leigh 



et al. (1984), Mildbraed (1908).

131

Synaphea quartzitica A.S.George

PROTEACEAE

[

Synaphea sp. Moora (A.S.George 17055)]

This taxon was known only from one collection made in October 1905 at Moora, until its recent

rediscovery by Alex George during work for his revision of the genus 

Synaphea.

S. quartiticais a low subshrub with several stems to ca. 7 cm tall.  The leaves have petioles 6-15

cm long.  The leaves are pinnately divided, the lobes to 6 mm wide and obtuse and mucronate.

They are flat and the apex of the lower lobes is further divided into three.  The flower spikes are

many-flowered, 6-18 cm long, the peduncle to 3 cm long, and the flowering spikes only a little

taller than the foliage.  The tubular perianth is yellow and glabrous, the adaxial tepal 4-4.5 mm

long, the abaxial tepal 2.5-3.5 mm long.  The stigma is oblong to trapeziform in shape, 0.7-1 mm

long, 0.3-0.4 mm wide, without prominent lobes.  There is an apical ring of translucent glands

around the ovary.

This species is distinguished by the combination of the characters of leaf shape, long flower

spikes and narrow stigma.



Flowering Period:  July-August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs near Moora where it grows on a quartzite hill in tall open shrubland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire


Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Moora

Mo

Shire Road Verge



1994

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  The known population should be marked, and land managers informed of the presence of the

population to prevent damage.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



132

-  Further survey is urgently required.



References

George (1995).



133

Tetratheca remota Joy Thomps.

TREMANDRACEAE

A small, open shrub to ca. 40 cm tall, with slender, branching stems which are covered with

minute protuberances.  The leaves are alternate and are broad at the base, narrow-linear above,

with revolute margins, nearly glabrous.  They are up to 2 cm long and appear to be deciduous

towards the base of the plant.  The flowers occur singly in the leaf axils and have their parts in

fives.  Each flower stalk is up to 20 mm long and is very slender.  The calyx lobes are dark

coloured, elliptic to ovate in shape.  The petals are dark pink in colour with a dark patch at the

base and are obovate to tongue-shaped, 6-7 mm long.  There are usually ten stamens, 3-4 mm

long, the filament slender, and hairy, to 0.5 mm long and set at an angle to the body of the anther.

The anther is 2 mm long, smooth and shiny, with a broad base contracting gradually to the yellow

anther tube which is 1.5-2 mm long, with a broad, almost straight opening. 

The species appears to be related to 

Tetratheca virgata and possibly T. deltoidea, but differs in

the slender anther filaments.



Flowering Period:  August-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from one population in the Lesueur area.  Previous collections appear to

have been made in the same area, apart from a collection made by James Drummond, which is

without a precise locality.  The type was collected by C.A. Gardner, from Mt Lesueur, and it is

thought to have been from the east side (E. Griffin, personal communication).

It has been reported that two other populations of the species are known from the Lesueur area

including one from Mt Lesueur, but no precise details are known and voucher specimens have not

been lodged at the Western Australian Herbarium (Martinick and Associates 1988).  Despite

extensive survey over many years in over 500 sites in the Lesueur area, this species has been

found only once by Ted Griffin.

It grows on grey sand and lateritic gravel in open wandoo woodland over low, open heath with

Hakea, Lambertia and Calothamnus species, herbs and sedges.  The known population is on an

upper slope facing south-west near the crest of a hill.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. NE of Mt Lesueur

D

Private


20.9.1988

60 est.


Excellent

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

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