Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



Yüklə 2.5 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə27/44
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü2.5 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   44

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Monitor the known population, particularly after fire, and inspect any other areas of similar

habitat which have been burnt.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in the Lesueur area.

-  Precise details are required for the three populations reported.

References

Leigh 


et al. (1984), Martinick and Associates (1988), Thompson (1976).

135

Thomasia formosa Paust

STERCULIACEAE

Handsome Thomasia

An erect, multistemmed shrub to 70 cm tall with branchlets, leaves and inflorescence covered

with reddish, stellate hairs.  The leaves are alternate, with stalks 5 mm long.  They are narrowly

ovate, 20-40 mm long, 4-10 mm wide, finely wrinkled on the upper surface.  The paired stipules

at the base of each leaf stalk are leaf-like, obliquely ovate, 4-7 mm long.  The inflorescence is a

raceme 70-120 cm long, arising opposite a leaf.  Each flower head has 7-many flowers and may

be branched.  There are three lanceolate bracteoles 7 mm long above the calyx which is pink,

papery and 10 mm long.  It has stellate hairs and is divided to below the middle into five ovate

lobes with thickened ribs.  The petals are spathulate in shape, slightly concave, without hairs, 1

mm long.  There are five narrowly triangular anthers.  The ovary is three-celled, with a covering

of white, stellate hairs and the style is glabrous, thread-like, 3 mm long.

This species is similar to 



Thomasia angustifolia and T. petalocalyx but has much larger flowers

and inflorescence and also differs in the form of the leaves.



Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known only from a small area west of Three Springs, where it was first collected

in 1972 and still occurs along 500 metres of road verge.

It occurs on red-brown lateritic soils, in open woodland of 



Eucalyptus wandoo, with low scrub.

Associated species include 



Allocasuarina campestrisDryandra and Grevillea species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. W of Three Springs TS

Shire Road Verge,

Private


2.10.1990

4+

Disturbed and



grazed

Response to Disturbance

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  The known population should be monitored.

-  Ensure that road markers are present.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



136

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is urgently required, particularly on nature reserves in the area of its known

occurrence and in remnant vegetation in the area.

References

Paust (ca. 1973, 1974).



137

Thomasia tenuivestita F.Muell.

STERCULIACEAE

A shrub to 2.5 m tall with a covering of soft, small, whitish hairs, without rigid hairs.  The leaves

have a close covering of soft, whitish hairs on both sides and are only slightly lobed.  They are

ovate-cordate in shape, to ca. 4 cm long.  The stipules are leafy, oblique or kidney-shaped.  The

flowers are in slender racemes with rather small flowers.  There are three oblong-linear

bracteoles.  The calyx is up to ca. 12.5 mm in diameter, mauve-pink in colour, with broad lobes

less than half the length of the calyx and each with a prominent midrib.  There are usually no

petals or only incomplete ones present.  The anthers taper to a long point and staminodes are not

present.  The ovary is tomentose and three-celled and the style is hairless.

This species is related to 

Thomasia grandiflorum.  Specimens collected from the Wongan Hills

area have been annotated by S. Paust in 1973 as differing from the Type description of the species

in having large, circular, stellate hairy petals.  Another specimen from the same area has been

identified as 



T. tenuivesta by C.A. Gardner, who noted that the specimen was larger and coarser

in form and indumentum than



 T. tenuivestita but best regarded as that species.  He considered that

a further specimen from the area agrees with the specimen collected by Burges in 1860 from S.W.

Australia but not with the Type.  It appears that further taxonomic study is required to elucidate

the status of this species.



Flowering Period:  July-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

T. tenuivestita was originally collected from the Murchison River, in the Geraldton or Gascoyne

Districts.  Several collections have been made from the Wongan Hills area in the Merredin

District and also from Bendering in the Narrogin District.

Specimens identified as this species have been collected from Winchester in the Moora District

but the species was not refound in that area during this survey.

It is recorded from a granite rock in the Wongan Hills area and at Winchester from grey loam

over clay, with York gum, 

Acacia sp., Dianella sp. and Podolepis canescens with wild oats.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*Winchester

Ca

-

8.10.1982



-

Population thickly

infested with wild

oats


Response to Disturbance

Unknown


138

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.

-  Taxonomic research is required to elucidate the status of this species.

References

Bentham (1863), Blackall and Grieve (1985), Mueller (1860), Paust (ca. 1973).



139

Thomasia sp. New Norcia (Cayser s.n. Nov. 1918)

STERCULIACEAE

A shrub with stems, leaves and flowers covered with stellate hairs, often rusty in colour on the

leaves and stems.  The leaves are alternate, with petioles ca. 1 cm long, and without stipules.

They are flat, cordate in shape, to 4 cm long.  The flowers are in racemes to 7 cm long, with up to

five flowers.  There are three thread-like bracteoles, covered with long stalked stellate hairs

beneath each calyx.  The calyx is spreading and divided to below the middle, with three

prominent veins on each blunt lobe.  It is covered with stellate hairs and is pink or lilac in colour.

The petals are absent and the anthers are narrowly triangular in shape, longer than the filaments

and opening inwardly in slits.  The ovary is papillate and three-celled.  The style is narrow and

hairless.

Flowering Period:  November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species had been collected only three times, twice in 1918 and once in 1955, from New

Norcia.

No details of habitat have been recorded.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*New Norcia

VP

-

29.11.1955



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  The population requires fencing.

-  Maintain liaison with landowner.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

140

-  Further survey is required on remnant vegetation in the area.



References

Paust (ca. 1973).



141

Thomasia sp. Green Hill (S.Paust 1322)

STERCULIACEAE

A low shrub to ca. 40 cm in height, multistemmed from the root stock.  The branchlets and lower

surface of the leaves are covered with greyish stellate hairs.  The leaves are flat, narrowly elliptic,

to 1.3 mm long and 5 mm wide.  The inflorescences are racemes of about three flowers.  There

are three narrow bracteoles.  The calyx is ca. 7 mm long, divided less than half way into five

obtuse, arching lobes.  It is mauve in colour with the ribs and base of calyx reddish-purple.  The

petals and anthers are dark purple-black.  The petals are rounded, ca. 0.5 mm long and hairless.

The anthers are narrowly triangular.  The ovary is stellate hairy and the style is hairless.

Flowering Period:  October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This taxon had been collected only once in 1972 from a few kilometres south of New Norcia.  It

was not refound there during this survey.  However, more recent survey for the species has

discovered two small populations ca. 1 km apart in remnant native vegetation.

It grows in open wandoo woodland on red-brown loam with laterite and quartz nodules.

Calothamnus,  Grevillea, Melaleuca and Glischrocaryon species grow in association with the

populations.  It was originally recorded growing on a rocky rise in wandoo woodland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of New Norcia 

VP

Private


11.10. 1995

13

Moderate-good



2. SW of New Norcia

VP

Private



11.10.1995

8

Moderate-good



3.*S of New Norcia

VP

-



9.10.1972

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  Maintain liaison with landowners.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



142

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required on conservation reserves and remnant vegetation in the area.



References

D. Papenfus (personal communication), Paust (ca. 1973).



143

Thysanotus vernalis Brittan

ANTHERICACEAE

A perennial herb with tuberous roots.  There are one or two basal leaves, 10-25 cm long, linear

with warty margins and acute tips, expanding at the base into membranous wings.  There are one

or two flowering stems, 14-35 cm tall, branching equally in the upper half.  The inflorescences

are flat-topped clusters of two to six flowers with pedicels 4-5 mm long.  The six purple perianth

segments are 10 mm long, the outer three are narrow with membranous margins, the inner three

elliptic with fringed margins.  There are six stamens, purple at the base, becoming yellow towards

the apex.  The outer three anthers are 2.5-3 mm long, the inner three are 4 mm long.  They are

straight and twisted.  The ovary is globular and sessile with a straight style 3.5 mm long.

This species is distinguished from other species of 

Thysanotus with tuberous roots by the

dichotomously branched flowering spike and by the almost equal, straight, not curved anthers.



Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

When described in 1960 this species was known only from the Lesueur area.  More recent

collections have been made from north of Badgingarra, and Eneabba to the northern boundary of

the District south of Mingenew.  It has been recorded recently from five locations in the Lesueur

National Park, generally from north-east of Mt Lesueur (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Grows in yellow sandy loam or orange loamy sand and ferruginous clay, in winter-wet areas in

heath, mallee heath or wandoo woodland.  Associated species include 

Eucalyptus  todtiana, E.

calophylla,  E. gittinsii, Thryptomene prolifera, Melaleuca uncinata, Allocasuarina campestris,

Verticordia chrysanthella and Borya sphaerocephala.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

Richardson Road,



S of Mingenew

TS

-



26.10.1992

-

-



2.

NE of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



5.10.1992

-

-



3.

N of Badgingarra

D

Shire Reserve



24.9.1988

-

-



4.* NNW of Badgingarra D

-

30.9.1967



-

-

5.* E. of Jurien



D

-

30.9.1967



-

-

6.* Cockleshell Gully



D

-

30.9.1967



-

-

7.* Lesueur Track



D

-

30.9.1967



-

-

8.* S of Mt Lesueur



D

-

2.10.1955



-

-

9.* S of White Lake



Co

?Private


27.9.1952

-

-



10.* S of Lake Logue

Ca

?Private



27.9.1952

-

-



Response to Disturbance

144

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Further survey.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to fully survey populations 2, 3 and 6 and to refind all populations

recorded earlier.

References

Brittan (1960, 1981, 1987).



145

Verticordia argentea A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

A tall open shrub to 2 m high and 90 cm wide with bluish-green leaves which are rounded in

shape, and entire, 4-7 mm long, 3.5-8 mm wide.  They are arranged in pairs, with successive pairs

at right angles.  The bracteoles are persistent.  The flowers are borne in the axils of the opposite,

decussate leaves so that they are arranged in four rows down the stem.  They are silvery pink-

mauve in colour with a deep pink centre.  They vary in intensity of colour and may even be

cream.  The peduncles are 1-1.5 mm long.  The sepals are 4-5 mm long with 7-10 lobes with

prominent silvery fringes and with peltate basal auricles covering the hypanthium.  The fringed

petals have small basal auricles and are 5-5.5 mm long.  The staminodes are shorter than the

stamens.  They are linear-subulate in shape and are entire but have a few prominent oil glands.

The anthers are attached basally with a swollen filament apex and open by slits.  The style is

straight and is 4.5-5 mm long, with a beard of hairs ca. 0.3 mm long over the upper third.

This species is related to 



Verticordia muelleriana but differs in flower colour, in the straight

bearded style and the short, sparsely glandular staminodes.



Flowering Period:  November-March

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known to occur over a narrow range of ca. 8 km to the south of Eneabba.  There is

also mention in a letter from Drummond to Hooker that a 

Verticordia,  lilac flowered, with

glaucous, heart-shaped, indented leaves and unbranched stems terminating in small corymbs of

flowers, was found about nine miles north of the Hill River and near the base of Mt Lesueur

(Burbidge 



et al. 1990).  However, V. fragrans has similar leaves and corymb-like inflorescences

of pink flowers terminating the stems, whereas 



V. argentea has racemes of flowers which are not

terminal.  



V. fragrans has been collected recently from south-east of Mt Lesueur, whereas

V. argentea has not been recorded from this area more recently. 

V. argentea grows on white to yellow lateritic sand, grey or black humus sand or brown coarse

sand, or on white sand over red gravelly loam.  It occurs in open shrubland with a closed shrub

understorey to 0.8 m high, or open low woodland over low open heath or scrub to 2m.

Associated species include 



V. aurea, V. grandisEucalyptus todtiana and Banksia species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. S of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



8.1.1992

1000+


Undisturbed

2. S of Eneabba

Ca

MRWA Road Verge 6.11.1992



10+

Partly disturbed

3. SSW of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



2.12.1992

Many plants

-

4.*S of Eneabba 



-

-

16.12.76



-

-

5.*S of Eneabba



Ca

-

26.11.88



1

-


146

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at population 2.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Lesueur area.



References

Burbidge 



et al. (1990), George (1991).

147

Verticordia bifimbriata A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

An erect, diffuse shrub to 90 cm tall with narrowly elliptic leaves 1.5 to 4 mm long.  The

bracteoles are entire.  The flowers are pink in colour, in dense spikes at the end of the branches.

Each flower has five green reflexed appendages from the apex of the hypanthium with acute free

apices.  The sepals are 6 mm long, with 6 or 7 lobes and with distinct reflexed auriculate

appendages.  The petals are 6 mm long, with a fringe which is 2.5-3 mm long, the segments of

which are further fringed.  The stamens are 3 mm long, glabrous as are the staminodes which are

narrow at the apex.  The anthers have a swollen filament apex and open by slits.  The style is 5

mm long and is bearded below the apex.

This species is distinguished by the fringed segments of the petal fringe and by the thick

hypanthium appendages with acute free apices.  The petal fringe distinguishes 



Verticordia

bifimbriata and V. paludosa from other pink flowered species in this section of Verticordia.  V.

bifimbriata is distinguished from V. paludosa by the auricles on the sepals, the free apices of the

hypanthium appendages and the slightly larger flowers.  There are also habitat differences. 

The petal fringe is only slightly bifimbriate in the specimens collected near York and at Boyagin.

Flowering Period:  October to January, March, April and June

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known in the Moora District from one population in the south of the District to the

west of Mogumber.  It has also been recorded from the Wannamal area, from north-east of

Toodyay and west of York in the Swan Region, and further south from the Boyagin and Dryandra

areas in the Narrogin District.

It grows in grey sand and gravel in open shrub mallee with low scrub and sedges, with 



Eucalyptus

todtiana and Leptospermum sp. near Mogumber.  Further south near Wannamal it grows on

gravel or gravelly loam in open wandoo woodland.  Elsewhere it has been recorded on yellow

sand, laterite over granite in powderbark wandoo woodland, yellow gravelly sand in jarrah

woodland over heath or yellow loamy sand over laterite in heath with 



E. drummondii and Banksia

sphaerocarpa.



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   44


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə