Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species occurs in two areas in the Moora District, to the east of Dongara and west of Eneabba, over a

geographic range of ca. 80 km.

It grows in sand, loam and loamy clay in low-lying seasonally moist areas, in shrubland or woodland. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Eneabba

Ca

?Nature Reserve



27.8.1992

1

Undisturbed



2. SE of Irwin

I

Shire Road Verge



11.7.1991

100+


Weed invasion

3. SE of Irwin

I

Shire Road Verge



11.7.1991

2

Disturbed



4. SE of Irwin

I

Shire Road Verge



11.7.1991

16

Disturbed



5. SE of Irwin

I

Shire Road Verge



11.7.1991

40 est.


Disturbed, sheep

driven along verge

6.  SW of Eneabba

Ca

MRWA Road Verge 11.7.1991



40+

Good, some weed

invasion

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


20

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road markers are in place at all road verge populations.

-  Determine the land status of population 1.

-  Maintain liaison with the Shires.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Chapman and Maslin (1992).

Illustration by J. Rainbird.


21

Acacia wilsonii R.S.Cowan & Maslin ms

MIMOSACEAE

This species was first collected in 1965 by Paul G. Wilson and three subsequent collections were made

with flower buds and fruits.  Flowering material was not collected until December 1992.



Acacia wilsonii ms is a low shrub to 30 cm tall with horizontal branches bearing terete erect phyllodes

which are sessile, continuous on the branchlets and up to 13 cm long.  The flower heads are globular,

golden yellow in colour, with stalks about 1 cm long.  The flowers have united sepals.  The legumes are

linear, subterete, to 5.5 cm long, containing oblong dull brown seeds. 



A. wilsonii ms is most closely related to A. ridleyana which has flat phyllodes which are clearly

differentiated from the branchlets and which have a pulvinus.  



A. campylophylla and A. chapmanii also

have phyllodes continuous on the branchlets and without a pulvinus but both have free sepals and petals

and the former has flat phyllodes. 

 A. aciphylla differs in its phyllodes which are rhombic in transverse

section with numerous nerves.



Flowering Period:  February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known only from the Moora District from a few collections made between Eneabba and Dandaragan over

a range of 60 km.  Only one population has been found recently.

Grows in white or yellow sand with lateritic gravel in low heath on the shoulder of lateritic upland.

Associated species include 

Hakea spathulata, Gastrolobium spinosum, Allocasuarina campestris and

Calothamnus quadrifidus.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. E of Eneabba

Ca

MRWA Road Verge



19.8.1993

20 est.


Undisturbed

2.* N of Badgingarra

Co

National Park



24.10.1982

-

-



3.* N of Badgingarra

D

-



2.11.1965

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road markers are in place at population 2.



22

-  Liaise with MRWA and the Shire to ensure that population 2 is not damaged by road work.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in February to refind populations 2 and 3 and to find further populations. The

species is inconspicuous when not in flower and has a summer flowering period, so may be more

common than appears at present.



References

R. Cowan and B. Maslin (personal communication).



23

Andersonia gracilis DC.

EPACRIDACEAE

This species was first described by de Candolle in 1839 from material collected by James Drummond.

It is a slender shrub, usually upright, up to 50 cm tall, sometimes with decumbent branches.  The leaves are

narrow, with erect or incurved, keeled tips, up to 5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide at the base.  The flowers are

white, pink, pale mauve or lilac, in dense terminal heads.  The sepals are 7-9 mm long, exceeding the

petals, style and stamens in length.  The corolla has lobes which are densely bearded to the tip and which

are as long as the tube.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded from two localities in the metropolitan area over a range of ca. 5 km and from three

localities in the Moora District over ca. 15 km.  These disjunct populations are ca. 160 km apart.

The species has been recorded from a winter-wet area in the metropolitan area and in the Moora District

from seasonally damp black sandy clay flats near swamps or in white sand over nodular ironstone.

Associated vegetation has been recorded as open low heath with 



Calothamnus hirsutus, Verticordia

densiflora and Kunzea recurva, or heath over sedges.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* E of Nambung

D

?Nature Reserve 



15.10.1984

-

-



2.* NW of Cataby

D

VCL



6.11.1988

-

-



3.* SSE of Cervantes

D

VCL



22.11.1992

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



24

-  Further survey is required to refind all known populations and survey fully, and to find new

populations.

References

Bentham (1869), de Candolle (1839), Watson (1962).



25

Anigozanthos humilis Lindl. subsp. grandis Hopper ms

HAEMODORACEAE

Giant Catspaw

An undescribed subspecies which was identified as early as the 1840s by James Drummond.

An upright plant with flat, curved leaves up to 24 cm long and flowering stems up to 100 cm long.  The

flowering stems bear a single flower cluster, although sometimes a second smaller flowering stem is

produced from one of the lower stem leaves.  The hairy flowers are ca. 25 mm long, yellow and orange in

colour.  The flower tube is slightly curved and the lobes are slightly reflexed.  The stamens are inserted at

three levels on the flower tube.

This subspecies is distinguished from the typical subspecies by the taller flowering stems and longer leaves.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been found in the Moora District in the Cataby area over a geographic range of 20 km but is also

known from the Swan Region west of Gingin 65 km further south.

Grows along creeks and near swamps in open wandoo or marri woodland on sandy clay loam soils.

Associated species include 

Beaufortia, Xanthorrhoea and Calothamnus species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. W of Dandaragan

D

Nature Reserve



26.9.1991

50 est.


Undisturbed but some

weed infestation

2. SW of Dandaragan

D

Shire Road Verge,



Private

26.9.1991

200+

Some weed invasion



and disturbance

3. S of Badgingarra

D

Recreation Reserve



26.9.1991

10+


Undisturbed

4. NW of Dandaragan

D

Private


1992

>200


Undisturbed

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road verge population is marked.

-  Maintain liaison with Shire and landowners.


26

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to survey fully population 4.



References 

Hopper (1987, 1993).



27

Arnocrinum drummondii Endl.

ANTHERICACEAE

This species was described by Endlicher in 1846.  Collections were made last century without details of

locality by Drummond and Preiss but Oldfield recorded "Murchison River" as the locality for his

collections of this species.

Arnocrinum drummondii is a perennial herb with a short rhizome covered by dense woolly hairs.  The

leaves are linear, arising in a tuft from the root, dying down each year.  The leaf blade is 16-70 mm long

with a few hairs.  The inflorescence stems have few branches and are 25-54 cm tall, with tufts of hair at

each branch or scale.

The inflorescence is a compressed spike, with brown, papery, sparsely hairy inflorescence bracts.  The

flowers are sessile with the blue perianth segments joined at base to form a tube 6 mm long and with six

equal spreading lobes 7-8 mm long.  They are twisted after flowering.  There are six stamens and the ovary

is superior.

Differs from 

A. gracillimum, which occurs in the Eneabba area, in its simple inflorescence stems, without

numerous short sterile branchlets, and from 



A. preissii, in the brown, papery, sparsely hairy inflorescence

bracts, whereas those of 



A. preissii are green-brown, hard and densely hairy. 

Flowering Period: September-January in the north of the range, December in the Moora District and

March in the York area.



Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Within the Moora District, 



A. drummondii has been collected from two localities 15 km apart, most

recently in 1962.  Habitat details for these collections indicate only that the species occurs in sand heath.

More recent collections have been made within the Geraldton District from Kalbarri, Cooloomia and west

of Mullewa, extending the geographic range of the species to ca. 400 km.  It occurs in white or yellow sand

in sandheath at Gunyidi and on dune or plateau tops or on sandplain in the Geraldton District.  It was

recorded in association with 



Banksia sceptrum and Gyrostemon ramulosus in a post fire thicket.

There is also one record from east of York, ca. 200 km SE of the populations in the Moora District.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Gunyidi



-

-

19.12.1962



-

-

2.* Watheroo



-

-

1901



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Recorded from post-fire thicket at the most northerly record.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback


28

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bentham (1878), Keighery (1987), Lehmann (1846).



29

Astroloma sp. Eneabba (N.Marchant s.n.)

EPACRIDACEAE

An undescribed species allied to 

Astroloma serratifolium and first collected in 1965 from north of

Badgingarra.



 

This taxon is an erect to spreading shrub to 1 m high and to 1.5 m wide with ovate pungent leaves and pale

to dark pink flowers.  The flower stalks in this species are generally longer than those of 

A. serratifolium

which has very short pedicels covered with overlapping bracts.  



A. sp. Eneabba has flower stalks up to 4

mm long with bracts at the base but few on the stalk.  The fruits are globular, green to red in colour and

with striations.

Flowering Period:  October-November, January, March-April

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Moora District from east of Jurien to Arrowsmith and east to Three Springs.  It has also been

recorded in the past to north-east of Dongara and near Mingenew in the Geraldton District.  The known

geographic range is 80 km but may extend to 130 km.

Grows in lateritic gravel over sand or brown loam, brown-yellow clay, or white, yellow or grey sandy clay

in open low wandoo woodland over scrub and low heath.  Associated species include 



Allocasuarina,

Acacia, Gastrolobium and Dryandra species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

2.* E of Eneabba

Ca

-



21.4.1978

-

-



4.* E of Mt Peron

D

National Park



25.7.1980

-

-



5.* SE of Three Springs

-

-



7.9.1983

-

-



6.

E of Eneabba

Ca

MRWA Road Verge



6.8.1992

2

Partly disturbed



7.

E of Greenhead

Co

MRWA Road Verge



18.11.1992

30+


Undisturbed

8.

E of Jurien



D

Education Reserve,

MRWA Road Verge

15.8.1991

2

Undisturbed



9.

N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

5+

Disturbed



10. N of Eneabba

I

?VCL, MRWA Road



Verge

30.4.1992

20+

Undisturbed



11. SW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road Verge



9.11.1991

3

Undisturbed 



12. SSW of Eneabba

Co

Shire Road Verge



18.11.1992

5+

Good



13. E of Eneabba

Ca

MRWA Road Verge



19.8.1993

1+

Undisturbed



14. E of Jurien

D

?MRWA Road Verge



14.8.1991

10+


Partly disturbed

15. E of Greenhead

Co

MRWA Road Verge



5.1991

3

Undisturbed



16. SW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road Verge,



Private

10.7.1991

10

-

17. SW of Mt Lesueur



D

Private


8.3.1991

2

Undisturbed



18.* N of Badgingarra

D

-



2.12.1965

-

-



19. Mt Benia

D

Reserve



2.5.1991

Occasional-

WH

-


30

20. E of Greenhead

Co

Shire Road Verge



1.5.1991

Occasional-

WH

-

21. Strawberry



I

Rail Reserve

5.8.1994

5+

Undisturbed



22. W of Mingenew

M

MRWA Road Verge



5.8.1994

1+

Narrow road



verge, weeds

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



References

A. Wilson (personal communication).



31

Boronia ericifolia Benth.

RUTACEAE


This species was first collected by James Drummond in 1843.  Its specific name refers to the genus 

Erica,

the heaths, referring to its heath-like appearance.



Boronia ericifolia is an upright shrub to 1 m tall with stellate hairy branches and the leaves in threes.  Each

leaf is narrow, ca. 7 mm long with the margins curled under.  The flowers have very short stalks and are

situated at the bases of the leaves.  The four petals are ca. 5 mm long, white or pale yellow in colour.  The

stamens are orange in colour and each anther has a short, white appendage.



Flowering Period:  April, June-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

B. ericifolia is known in the Moora District from two collections made from west of Moora but its main

area of distribution is in the Wongan Hills, 80 km to the south-east in the Merredin District.

This species is recorded growing in yellow sand in the Moora District and in the Wongan Hills as growing

in tall shrubland or thickets and sometimes under eucalypts, on slopes or low lying areas, on laterite or in

yellow loam, sandy loam, or brown, gravelly clayey sand over laterite.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* W of Moora

-

-

 6.9.1966



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

32

Bentham (1863), Elliot and Jones (1982), P.G. Wilson (unpublished data).



33

Calandrinia dielsii Poelln.

PORTULACACEAE

This species is known only from the Type collection which was made by Diels in 1901 from the Watheroo

area.


It is an annual plant with rosetted basal leaves, up to 6 cm long, widening towards the tip to ca. 5 mm wide.

The flowering stems are scarcely longer than the basal leaves and have similar but smaller leaves

alternately or oppositely spaced on them.  The flowers grow singly in the axils of these leaves and each has

five narrow petals, ca. 8 mm long, rosy red in colour, with a white base.  There are 6-8 stamens.  The fruit

is a four-valved capsule, ca. 2 mm long.

The only known specimen of this species has only one flower and the taxonomic status is uncertain until

further work has been completed.  It was stated in 1985 that it is almost certainly synonymous with another

common species (J. Briggs, personal communication) but no further information is yet available.



Flowering Period:  Late July

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The type collection was made from Watheroo, in winter-wet areas, growing among short grasses in clay.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Melbourne, Watheroo

-

-

30.7.1901



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Research Requirements

-  Confirm the taxonomic status of the species.

-  Conduct further survey in the Watheroo area if the taxonomic status is retained.

References

Poellnitz (1934).



34

Calytrix chrysantha Craven

MYRTACEAE

This species was first collected in 1968 but was not recognised as a distinct species until 1987.  It was

identified until then as either 



Calytrix flavescensC. asperula or C. aurea.

C. chrysantha is an erect hairless shrub to 1.3 m tall.  Stipules are present and are about 0.25 mm long.  The

leaves are appressed to the stem, closely spaced, oblong to linear in shape, 1.25-4 mm long and keeled.

The flowers may be clustered.  The bracteoles are 4-6 mm long, free, deciduous and turgid towards the

apex. The hypanthium is trigonous, 10-12 ribbed, 7.5-10 mm long and adnate to the style.  The calyx

segments are joined at the base, the blade obovate, to 1.75 mm long, the awn 10 mm long.  The five petals

are yellow, ovate to lanceolate, up to 7 mm long.  There are 45-55 stamens, with yellow filaments and a

prominent globular connective on each anther. 

This species is closely related to 



C. flavescens from which it differs in the distinctive form of the anther

connective and the turgid bracteoles.



  C. asperula is also a close relative but C. chrysantha differs in the

10-12 ribbed hypanthium and the anther connective.  The anther connective is similar in 



C. aurea, but this

species has long acuminate bracteoles and larger leaves.





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