Wider spectrum of fruit traits in invasive than native floras may



Yüklə 144.95 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü144.95 Kb.

Wider spectrum of fruit traits in invasive than native floras may

increase the vulnerability of oceanic islands to plant invasions

Christoph Kueffer, Lilian Kronauer and Peter J. Edwards

C. Kueffer (kueffer@env.ethz.ch), L. Kronauer and P. J. Edwards, Inst. of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich, CHÁ8092 Zurich, Switzerland.

PlantÁanimal mutualisms such as seed dispersal can play an important role in enabling some species to become invasive.

For example, an introduced species could become invasive because birds prefer its fruits to those of native plants. To

investigate this possibility, we compared various measures of fruit quality of 22 of the most common native and invasive

woody species on the oceanic island Mahe´ (Seychelles, Indian Ocean).

Individual measures of food quality tended to vary much more amongst invasive species than amongst native species;

thus, whereas for particular traits the fruits of some invasive species had higher values than any native species, others had

relatively low values. However, invasive species consistently produced fruits with a lower water content, resulting in a

higher relative yield (i.e. dry pulp weight to total wet fruit weight ratio), and a higher energy content. The fruits of the

most abundant invasive tree Cinnamomum verum (Lauraceae) were of particularly high nutritional quality, with

individual berries containing 3.5 times more protein and 55 times more lipid than the median values of the native species.

We suggest that our results may reflect a general tendency for island plants to produce fruits of low energy content,

perhaps reflecting reduced competition for dispersal agents on isolated islands. In addition, we argue that inconsistent

results on the relevance of fruit quality for plant invasions reported in the literature may be resolved by comparing the

widths of trait spectra for native and alien floras rather than average values. Gaps in the native fruit trait spectrum may

provide opportunities for particular invasive species, and weaken the resistance of regional floras to invasions. Such empty

niche opportunities may occur for several reasons, including generally broader trait spectra in globally assembled alien

than regional native floras (especially on oceanic islands), or the loss of native species due to human activities. More

generally, a focus on trait variation rather than average trends may help to advance generalisation in invasion biology.

Invasions of alien plant species pose major threats to

biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (Millennium Eco-

system Assessment 2003), particularly on oceanic islands

(Denslow 2003). Increasingly, the importance of plantÁ

animal mutualisms such as pollination and seed dispersal

in plant invasions has been recognized (Richardson et al.

2000). However, although many of the most problematic

invasive plants are frugivore-dispersed (Buckley et al. 2006)

Á especially among tropical woody species (Binggeli 1996,

Kueffer et al. 2004) Á there have been few studies of how

frugivores influence plant invasions (Gosper et al. 2005,

Buckley et al. 2006).

It has been suggested that some invasive plants are

successful because native frugivores prefer their fruits to

those of native plants (Vila and D’Antonio 1998, Gosper

et al. 2005, Buckley et al. 2006), and they therefore gain an

advantage in dispersal. Effective dispersal by frugivores

could facilitate an invasion by increasing the rate of spread Á

even enabling propagules to reach remote areas Á and by

weakening the resistance of habitats to invasion through

increased propagule pressure at a site (Von Holle and

Simberloff 2005). Furthermore, the presence of invasive

plants could attract dispersers away from native plants,

thereby negatively affecting the mutualisms between native

plants and their frugivores (Traveset and Richardson 2006).

If such effects are common, fruit traits may help in

predicting the invasiveness of alien plants (Buckley et al.

2006). It is therefore important to understand whether

fruiting traits of invasive plants Á at the level of both the

single fruit, e.g. size and nutritional content, and the whole

plant, e.g. phenology and size of the fruit crop Á tend to

make them more attractive to birds than native species.

Several studies have shown that invasive plants often

produce larger fruit crops or have longer fruiting periods

than native species, but few have considered the traits of the

fruits themselves, and no clear and consistent picture has

emerged of differences between native and invasive species

(Buckley et al. 2006). In particular, we are unaware of any

study comparing the fruit characteristics of a set of common

native and invasive plants in one region.

We compared the fruit characteristics of bird-dispersed

native and invasive woody plants on the oceanic island

Mahe´ in the Seychelles (Indian Ocean) to test the

hypothesis that native plants of oceanic islands produce

fruits of lower nutritional value than introduced aliens. It

has been said that isolated islands are particularly vulnerable

Oikos 118: 1327Á1334, 2009

doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.17185.x,

#

2009 The Authors. Journal compilation # 2009 Oikos



Subject Editor: Eric Seablom. Accepted 9 March 2009

1327


to invasions because the native plants are thought to be less

competitive than mainland species (Denslow 2003). This

idea has so far mainly been tested for competition for

growth-related resources (Denslow 2003, Schumacher et al.

2008, 2009), and we extended it to include competition for

seed dispersers. There are a number of reasons why oceanic

island plants may be less competitive than mainland species.

In communities that owe their origin to long-distance

dispersal, particular niches are commonly filled by taxo-

nomic groups that are not necessarily well suited to this role

(disharmony, e.g. woodiness of typically herbaceous gen-

era), and ecologically very plastic generalists typically

dominate habitats across broad environmental gradients

(e.g. Metrosideros polymorpha in Hawaii, or Northea hornei

in Seychelles) (Carlquist 1965, Whittaker 1998, Denslow

2003). Thus, more specialized mainland species may be

stronger competitors under particular environmental con-

ditions. And in the case of competition for seed dispersers,

high dispersability may be less important for plant fit-

ness on islands than on the mainland (Carlquist 1965,

Whittaker 1998).

The island of Mahe´ offered a convenient study system

for our purposes because the diversity of both plants and

dispersers is small, and the dispersal systems are highly

generalized (Stoddart 1984, Kueffer 2006). Thus, about 20

native and 10 invasive woody plants dominate these forests,

and the majority of these produce small fruits (less than

about 15 mm in diameter) that are dispersed by three

common frugivorous birds (Stoddart 1984, Kueffer 2006) Á

an endemic bulbul Hypsipetes crassirostris, an endemic fruit

pigeon Alectroenas pulcherrima, and an introduced Mynah

Acridotheres tristis. In addition to birds, one endemic fruit

bat species Pteropus seychellensis is also an important seed

disperser.

To test the hypothesis that invasive species produce fruits

of higher nutritional quality than native species, we

compared various measures of fruit quality of 22 common

native and invasive woody species.

Methods

Study system



The study was carried out on Mahe´, the main inner

island of the Republic of Seychelles (48S, 558E, total area

154 km

2

, 0Á900 m a.s.l.). The island has a humid tropical



climate, with a mean annual rainfall of 1600Á3500 mm

depending on altitude. Although there is no pronounced

seasonality in rainfall, the period from June through

September is generally drier (mean monthly rainfall: 80Á

150 mm at sea level) than from November through

February (300Á450 mm) (Schumacher et al. 2008). The

forest vegetation of Mahe´ was heavily affected by human

activities until the 1970s, and is mostly secondary and

dominated by alien trees, especially Cinnamomum verum

(Kueffer and Vos 2004).

The original frugivore fauna of the inner Seychelles

islands consisted mainly of various lizards (Mabuya and

Phelsuma spp.), a giant tortoise (now extinct), an endemic

fruit bat Pteropus seychellensis seychellensis, and six bird

species. The latter included two mainly insectivorous white-

eyes Zosterops modestus, (of which only ca 300 individuals

are left on one small island); Z. semiflava (extinct), two fruit

predatory parrots Coracopsis nigra barklyi (ca 300 indivi-

duals left on one island); Psittacula eupatria wardi (extinct),

a bulbul Hypsipetes crassirostris (length: 24Á25 cm), and a

fruit pigeon Alectroenas pulcherrima (a genus related to the

PtilinopusÁDucula fruit pigeons, length: 23Á25 cm). Today,

an introduced mynah Acridotheres tristis (length: 25Á26 cm)

is also an important seed disperser. The largest fruits known

to be swallowed by the common native bird species are of

10Á15 mm diameter (depending on firmness) for Hypsipetes

and 20 mm diameter for Alectroena (Kueffer 2006).

Plant material

The plant species used in the study included 14 native and 8

invasive woody species (Table 1); the species range from

shrubs to large trees and include members of 12 plant

families. The native plants selected are all common in

inland habitats in the Seychelles (Friedmann 1994), and

include 11 species endemic to the Seychelles, and three

(Aphloia theiformis, Canthium bibracteatum and Dracaena

reflexa) that also occur on other Indian Ocean islands. Most

of the invasive species are common in semi-natural to

natural mid-altitude habitats in the Seychelles, though

Litsea glutinosa is mainly restricted to lowland areas (Kueffer

and Vos 2004). Two of the invasive (Chrysobalanus icaco,

Syzygium jambos) and one native species (Syzygium wrightii)

have larger fruits that are only dispersed by fruit bats,

although they are eaten by birds (Kueffer 2006). Fruits of

Psidium cattleianum are dispersed in parts by birds and as

whole fruits by fruit bats. The species studied include most

of the widespread fleshy-fruited native and invasive woody

species of inland habitats in Seychelles, the main omissions

being the invasive Lantana camara, and the natives Deckenia

nobilis, Ludia mauritiana, Pouteria obovata, and two Ficus

species (Fleischmann 1997, Kueffer and Vos 2004, Kueffer

2006).

Samples for chemical analysis were collected on the



island of Mahe´ between February to September 2004. The

fruits were taken from several individuals and two to four

sites per species in secondary forests and inselberg (rocky

outcrop) vegetation, except for those of Litsea glutinosa,

which were collected from gardens, and those of Phoenico-

phorium borsigianum, which were collected from the

botanic garden in Victoria. Each species sample consisted

of 25 to several 100 ripe fruits, or 10Á15 fruits in the case of

Gastonia crassa, Memecylon caeruleum and Syzygium

wrightii.

Fruit quality

Pulp and seeds were separated and weighed. They were

then dried at 40Á508C for four days and weighed again to

determine the water content and dry mass per fruit. One

pooled sample per species was stored in plastic bags with

silica gel before being analysed at the Swiss Federal Res.

Inst. for Farm Animals and Dairy Farming (ALP) in

Posieux, Switzerland. For the chemical analyses, the dried

pulp was ground in a laboratory mill with a one millimetre

sieve. A constant dry matter content was determined with a

1328


thermographic system (at 1058C for 2 h 40 min). The

following minimum quantities of dry fruit were used for the

various analyses: 5 g for lipid determinations, 5 g for sugar

and fibre and 0.5 g for protein. There was insufficient fruit

material of some species to perform all these analyses (Table 1).

Crude fibre as determined by the Weende method (von

Lengerken 2004) represents the content of organic struc-

tural material such as cellulose or lignin that is not soluble

in a weak acid or alkali solution (similar to the conditions in

animal digestion). The plant material was dissolved in

sulphuric acid (1.25% H

2

SO



4

solution, 1 h at 958C) and

potassium hydroxide base (1.25% KOH solution, 1 h at

958C). The insoluble residue was then washed with water

and acetone, dried (1 h at 1308C), weighed and ignited at

5308C for 1 h. The loss in weight on ignition was identified

as crude fibre.

To determine total sugar content, the sample was shaken

with 80% ethyl alcohol at 808C for 1 h. After filtration,

total sugar content was quantified colorimetrically based on

a reaction with 1 g 3,5-dihydroxyltoluol (Orcin) in 1 l 70%

sulphuric acid (H

2

SO

4



) (calibrated with sucrose).

Crude protein was determined using the DUMAS

method (von Lengerken 2004). Nitrogen content was

determined with a nitrogen analyzer after complete oxida-

tion of the plant material at ca 11008C. From these results,

crude protein content was calculated as total nitrogen

content multiplied by 6.25.

Crude total lipid content was determined with a Soxhlet

system. The plant material was hydrolysed in boiling 10%

HCl solution for 1 h (Berntrop method), and then extracted

with petrol ether at 40Á608C in the Soxhlet system.

Calculations and statistical analyses

Mean fruit characteristics per species were used in the data

analyses. The energy content of the pulp was calculated

based on the following conversion factors: 5.2 kcal g

(1

(protein), 9.3 kcal g



(1

(lipid), and 4.0 kcal g

(1

(sugar)


(Watt and Muriel 1963). The following derived factors

were calculated: relative yield (ratio of dry pulp to total wet

fruit weight including seeds), seed burden (seed to total wet

fruit weight ratio), overall profitability (nutritional contents

per total wet fruit weight), and single fruit profitability

(nutritional contents per single fruit). The differences in

fruit characteristics between native and invasive species were

tested with a WilcoxonÁMannÁWhitney-test. All statistical

analyses were performed with R ver. 2.7.0 (R Development

Core Team 2008).

Results

The fruits of invasive species had a lower average water



content than those of native species (p 00.003), resulting in

a 50% higher relative yield (p 00.01), i.e. ratio of dry pulp

to total wet fruit weight including seeds (Fig. 1, Table 2).

However, the seed burden, i.e. the seed to total fruit weight

ratio, did not differ between the two groups (p 00.2, Fig. 1).

There were no significant differences between native and

invasive fruits in the average values of fibre, protein, lipid

and sugar contents (p]0.5). However, the highest values of

these traits Á which ranged from around twice the median

value of native species for fibre, protein and sugar, to 30

Table 1. The characteristics of the studied woody native and invasive plant species and the measured parameters. The wet fruit weight is

given in mg and the fruit diameter in mm. For asymmetric fruits the minimum diameter is given. A small tree is B10 m. Nomenclature and

maximal stem height was taken from Friedmann (1994).

Species


Family

Height


Fruit weight

Fruit diameter

Native species

Aphloia theiformis

*

Flacourtiaceae



small tree

431


10

Canthium bibracteatum

Rubiaceae

small tree

167

5.5


Dillenia ferruginea

Dilleniaceae

tree

932


9.5

Dracaena reflexa

Liliaceae

shrub


1857

11.5


Erythroxylum sechellarum

Erythroxylaceae

small tree

290


6

Gastonia crassa

Araliaceae

small tree

954

10

Memecylon eleagni



Melastomataceae

small tree

424

8.5


Nephrosperma vanhoutteana

Palmae


tree

2303


12.5

Paragenipa wrightii

Rubiaceae

small tree

867

9.5


Phoenicophorium borsigianum

Palmae


tree

324


8

Psychotria pervillei

Rubiaceae

shrub


104

6

Roscheria melanochaetes



Palmae

small tree

187

6.5


Syzygium wrightii

Myrtaceae

tree

5124


18

Timonius sechellensis

Rubiaceae

small tree

891

9.5


Invasive species

Ardisia crenata

Myrsinaceae

shrub


220

9

Chrysobalanus icaco



Chrysobalanaceae

small tree

16137

32.5


Cinnamomum verum

Lauraceae

tree

723


9

Clidemia hirta

Melastomataceae

shrub


230

7.5


Litsea glutinosa

Lauraceae

small tree

621


5.5

Memecylon caeruleum

Melastomataceae

shrub


625

9

Psidium cattleianum



Myrtaceae

small tree

21380

35

Syzygium jambos



Myrtaceae

tree


6884

24.5


*subspec.

madagascariensis

var.

seychellensis



.

1329


times as high for lipid content Á were always found in fruits

of invasive species (Fig. 1). The average energy value of

invasive fruits (calculated from the protein, sugar and lipid

contents) was 1.6 times higher than that of native fruits, and

the overall profitability (i.e. energy content per total wet

fruit weight) was 2.4 times higher, both of these differences

being significant (p 00.02 and 0.01, respectively; Fig. 1).

The variances in the trait values were mostly lower for

native species than for invasive species (Fig. 1), with the

differences being especially marked for water and lipid

contents (ratios of variances of 0.18 and 0.08, respectively).

Across all species, the protein content of pulp was

positively correlated with the lipid content (r 00.6, p 0

0.01) and negatively with the sugar content (r 0(0.7, p 0

0.002). Lipid and sugar contents were negatively correlated

(r 0(0.5, p 00.05). The water content was negatively

correlated with the lipid and energy contents (r 0(0.6,

p 00.02).

Discussion

A trend for low energy content among native woody

plants on an oceanic island?

We found that native species on the tropical oceanic island

of Mahe´ tended to produce fruits of lower energy content

than invasive species (Fig. 1, Table 2). The reason for the

difference was the higher water (resulting in a lower relative

yield) and lower energy contents per dry pulp of fruits of

native species. These trends were also supported in the two

intra-generic comparisons (Memecylon eleagni vs M. caer-

uleum, Syzygium wrightii vs S. jambos). Among the invasive

species studied, Litsea glutinosa is restricted to some lowland

areas, but exclusion of this species from the analysis did not

substantially alter the results.

The mean water content of the invasive fruits (77.2%)

was similar to values reported for bird-dispersed fleshy fruits

Figure 1. The water content of the pulp (%), relative yield (dry pulp weight: total wet fruit weight,%), seed burden (wet seed: total fruit

weight,%), and the chemical composition in mg or kcal (energy content) per g dry pulp of 14 native (N) and 8 invasive (I) woody species.

The overall profitability (OP) is calculated based on the relative yield and the content per dry pulp as the energy content per g of total wet

fruit weight. The boxÁwhisker-plots indicate the median (line), mean (filled circle), first and third quartiles (box), and the range of the

data, with outliers indicated by open circles and defined as being more than 1.5 times the interquartile range above/below the first/third

quartile.

1330


in the global angiosperm flora (71.8%, Jordano 1995), and

fleshy fruits of the native flora of Hong Kong (78%, Corlett

1996), and alien plants in Hong Kong, Australia and New

Zealand (76Á78%, n 012Á15 species per region, Williams

and Karl 1996, Corlett 2005, Gosper et al. 2006), while the

native species had a considerably higher water content

(86%). Methodological differences make it difficult to

compare our data on energy with those from other studies,

but Jordano (1995) reported an inverse relationship

between water and energy contents for the global angios-

perm flora, and the same trend was also evident in our

study. Although a high water content can contribute to fruit

quality during the dry season in areas with a seasonal

climate (Herrera 1982), such an effect is unlikely to be

relevant in the Seychelles, with its humid tropical climate.

In view of these comparisons, we conclude that fruits of

native species tend to be poor in energy, rather than those of

the invasive species being particularly energy-rich. Indeed, it

may be hypothesised that, compared to mainland species,

plants on oceanic islands have evolved under conditions of

less severe competition for seed dispersal agents, and

therefore do not invest as much in attracting frugivores

(Kueffer 2006). This could be partly because of the lower

plant and frugivore species richness on islands, and partly

because high dispersability is less important for plant fitness

(Carlquist 1965, Whittaker 1998). We are unaware of any

comparative data that could be used to support this

hypothesis apart from a single observation that fruits of

the island endemic Arbutus canariensis have a substantially

lower energy content than those of the continental congener

A. unedo (A. G. Fernandez de Castro pers. comm.). More

research is needed to test the hypothesis that fruits from

island plants have generally a lower energy content than

those of continental species.

Higher variation of fruit traits among invasive than

native species

A second pattern in our data was that the variation of fruit

traits was generally considerably higher among invasive than

native species (Fig. 1). In particular, the highest contents of

sugar, protein and lipids were consistently found among the

invasive species. The most common invasive tree in the

Seychelles, Cinnamomum verum, had particularly high

protein and lipid contents, so that the single fruit profit-

ability (i.e. protein or lipid intake per fruit) was 3.5 times

higher than the median values of native species for protein,

and 55 times higher for energy. Given that searching and

feeding on fruits are costly in terms of both time and

energy, these differences may significantly affect fruit

choices by birds.

In the case of the native species, the scarcity of fruits with

high contents of particular nutrients may reflect a paucity

of specialised fruits in the flora of a small oceanic island.

Fruits that are particularly rich in either lipids, protein or

particular types of sugars are often interpreted as being

adapted to dispersal by specialist frugivores (Snow 1981,

Corlett 1998, Witmer and Van Soest 1998, Jordano 2000,

Levey and Martinez del Rio 2001). In particular, relatively

large fruits of high nutritional quality are typically dispersed

by specialised frugivorous birds such as fruit pigeons (Snow

1981, Corlett 1998, Meehan et al. 2002). However, few if

any plants on the Seychelles depend only upon the endemic

fruit pigeon Alectroenas pulcherrima for fruit dispersal

(Kueffer 2006); and, except for the palms, no native species

belong to families producing specialised lipid- or protein-

rich fruits (e.g. Burseraceae, Lauraceae, Meliaceae, Myris-

ticaceae, Rutaceae, Solanaceae, Jordano 1995, Corlett 1996,

1998). Rather, the Seychelles fruit pigeon may depend on a

more opportunistic diet composed mainly of smaller fruits

Table 2. Water content of the pulp (%), relative yield (%), and nutritional composition in mg or kcal (energy content) per g dry pulp of the

studied native and invasive woody species from the Seychelles.

Species

Water content Relative yield



Fibre

Protein


Sugar

Lipid


Energy

Native species

Aphloia theiformis

87

12



80

57

162



Canthium bibracteatum

80

15



112

40

351



7

1.7


Dillenia ferruginea

86

13



59

57

276



10

1.5


Dracaena reflexa

86

11



Erythroxylum sechellarum

88

8



55

46

351



128

2.8


Gastonia crassa

86

13



75

41

270



Memecylon eleagni

84

15



133

28

400



8

1.8


Nephrosperma vanhoutteana

90

7



231

57

131



13

0.9


Paragenipa wrightii

87

12



217

43

208



21

1.3


Phoenicophorium borsigianum

88

8



112

93

46



14

0.8


Psychotria pervillei

90

7



Roscheria melanochaetes

84

10



Syzygium wrightii

87

9



171

45

244



11

1.3


Timonius sechellensis

82

13



247

39

188



8

1.0


Invasive species

Ardisia crenata

83

11

180



51

232


Chrysobalanus icaco

89

9



81

28

421



7

1.9


Cinnamomum verum

66

22



264

62

39



252

2.8


Clidemia hirta

76

22



210

73

380



51

2.4


Litsea glutinosa

74

17



46

113


36

350


4.0

Memecylon caeruleum

78

15

94



36

451


48

2.4


Psidium cattleianum

74

20



240

24

264



7

1.8


Syzygium jambos

77

15



176

52

255



10

1.4


1331

that are also dispersed by other frugivorous birds. According

to our data, some of the smaller fruits do, indeed, have

relatively high lipid and/or protein contents, e.g. Phoenico-

phorium borsigianum and Erythroxylum seychellarum; the

same may also apply to some of the species that we did not

study, such as Trema orientalis and Rapanea spp. (Snow

1981). Further research is needed to determine if and why

specialised fruits are missing from small oceanic islands.

There are other possible explanations for the lower

variation of fruit traits among native species that also

deserve to be mentioned. For example, human activities

could have reduced the abundance of species with lipid or

protein-rich fruits disproportionately (e.g. the now rare

Trema orientalis or Rapanea spp.), though it is not clear why

this should have happened. Or trait variation in the invasive

flora may be broader than that in the local flora, simply

because the invasive species have been sampled’ from a

much wider spectrum of biogeographic and ecological

contexts.

Do fruit traits help to predict the invasiveness of alien

species?

Effective dispersal is often important for an alien species to

become invasive. Debussche and Isenmann (1990) sug-

gested that competition for dispersal by a diverse native

community of fleshy-fruited plants may have hindered the

invasion of fleshy-fruited alien species in the Mediterranean.

In contrast, several studies have shown that invasive species

may profit from preferential dispersal of their fruits by the

local frugivore community (Buckley et al. 2006).

However, apart from the importance of producing a

fruit of a comparable size to some native fruits (Richardson

et al. 2000, Renne et al. 2002, Gosper et al. 2005), rather

little is known about which fruit traits contribute to the

invasiveness of an alien species (Buckley et al. 2006).

Previous studies comparing pairs of native and invasive or

alien species have produced contradictory results, so that no

general conclusions can be drawn about the importance of

fruit quality: in some cases, fruits of invasive or alien species

were found to be larger (Sallabanks 1993, Corlett 2005) or

to have a lower seed load (Corlett 2005), a higher lipid

content (Gosper et al. 2006) or a higher energy content

(Vila and D’Antonio 1998), but in other cases the native

species produced fruits with a higher energy (White and

Stiles 1992, Drummond 2005) or mineral (calcium, iron

and sodium) content (Nelson et al. 2000), or there were no

differences in fruit quality (Gosper 2004). Our study

appears to be the first to compare the fruit characteristics

of a broad set of common native and invasive plants in a

given region, but our results seem to add further to this

incoherent pattern. Invasive species in Seychelles produce

fruits with a wide range of properties: some have particu-

larly high nutrient contents, especially protein or lipids, but

others are of lower quality than most or all native species

studied.


However, there is good evidence that some of the

invasive species in Seychelles that produce fruits with

particularly high contents of some nutrients profit from

an efficient dispersal. Following heavy deforestation at

around 1800, Cinnamomum verum (true cinnamon), a

species that produces fruits of particularly high protein and

lipid contents, rapidly colonized large areas (Sauer 1967,

Stoddart 1984). Today C. verum is by far the most

abundant species on Mahe´, accounting for 80% of the

canopy trees in most inland habitats. In a food preference

experiment in which captive birds were offered the fruits of

several native and alien species, Seychelles bulbuls Hypsipetes

crassirostris Á the most common frugivorous bird Á preferred

fruits of C. verum to those of all other species except the

endemic Dillenia ferruginea (Kueffer 2006). Clidemia hirta,

which produces fruits with 1.6 times more sugar and

protein than the median of the native species, has recently

spread rapidly on Mahe´; within four years of it being first

recorded in the late 1990s, it had spread into natural areas

throughout the island (Kueffer and Zemp 2004).

The relevance of variation rather than general trends

for comparing traits of native and invasive floras

We suggest that the inconsistent conclusions about the

relevance of fruit quality for plant invasions reported in the

literature may be resolved by comparing the width of trait

spectra between native and alien floras rather than average

values. General differences in fruit traits between the means

for native and invasive species groups may not be expected

for several reasons. First, only some invasive species may

depend on efficient dispersal or on high fruit quality for

efficient dispersal, while others rely on some other

advantage for reproduction or dispersal (e.g. fruiting

phenology, asexual reproduction). For instance, the species

that produced the fruits with the lowest energy content

among the invasive species, Syzygium jambos, has a patchy

distribution in the form of dense, monospecific clumps,

indicating low dispersability (Kueffer pers. obs.). Second,

because of tradeoffs in fruit specialisation, fruits tend to

have either high sugar or lipid and protein contents (Snow

1981, Corlett 1998, Witmer and Van Soest 1998, Jordano

2000, Levey and Martinez del Rio 2001). In fact, in our

dataset sugar content was negatively correlated with lipid

and protein contents. Thus, invasive species may profit

from opposing specialisations, which has recently also been

emphasised for growth-related traits (Daehler 2003, Schu-

macher et al. 2008, 2009). Thus, rather than comparing

native and invasive floras in terms of the average values of

particular traits, it may be more informative to compare

their ranges of variation, so as to identify gaps in the native

trait spectrum that could be exploited by an alien species

(Moles et al. 2008).

This study has shown that gaps in the native fruit quality

spectrum, especially the lack of lipid-rich fruits, may

provide opportunities for invasive species with such fruits,

and weaken the resistance of an oceanic island flora to

invasions. On continents, empty niche opportunities for

lipid-rich fruits may also occur, for example when anthro-

pogenic disturbances affect plants with specialised fruits

more than those with generalised fruits. Or, as discussed

above, a sampling effect may generally lead to broader trait

spectra within invasive than native floras. Several other cases

have been reported of invasive species with particularly

lipid-rich fruits becoming problematic because of efficient

bird-assisted seed dispersal (e.g. Cinnamomum camphora,

1332


Litsea glutinosa, Ochna serrulata, Mandon-Dalger et al.

2004, Vos 2004, Gosper et al. 2006, Neilan et al. 2006).

We conclude that a focus upon trait variation rather than

on average differences between native and invasive floras

may help to resolve inconsistencies in conclusions about the

relevance of fruit quality for plant invasions. Even if there is

no general tendency for lower nutritional quality among

native species, empty niche opportunities might make

oceanic islands more vulnerable to invasions by some alien

species with particular fruit traits. More generally, a focus

on trait variation rather than general trends may help to

overcome inconclusive results on the invasiveness of alien

plants, and advance generalisation in invasion biology.

Acknowledgements Á The constant support of the Seychelles

Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, and particularly

the Forestry and Conservation sections, was crucial for the success

of the project. We thank Walter Glauser and the Swiss Federal

Institute for Farm Animals and Dairy Farming for the chemical

analyses of the fruit material, and Ge´rard Rocamora, Perley

Constance, Rodney Fanchette, James Mougal and Eva Schuma-

cher for their assistance with the data collection in Seychelles. The

paper profited substantially from the comments on earlier versions

by Christopher Kaiser, Katy Beaver and Dennis Hansen. Funding

was provided by a research grant from the Swiss Federal Institute

of Technology (ETH Zurich).

References

Binggeli, P. 1996. A taxonomic, biogeographical and ecological

overview of invasive woody plants. Á J. Veg. Sci. 7: 121Á124.

Buckley, Y. M. et al. 2006. Management of plant invasions

mediated by frugivore interactions. Á J. Appl. Ecol. 43: 848Á

857.

Carlquist, S. 1965. Island life. Á Natural History Press.



Corlett, R. T. 1996. Characteristics of vertebrate-dispersed fruits

in Hong Kong. Á J. Trop. Ecol. 12: 819Á833.

Corlett, R. T. 1998. Frugivory and seed dispersal by vertebrates in

the Oriental (Indomalayan) region. Á Biol. Rev. 73: 413Á448.

Corlett, R. T. 2005. Interactions between birds, fruit bats and

exotic plants in urban Hong Kong, south China. Á Urban

Ecosyst. 8: 275Á283.

Daehler, C. C. 2003. Performance comparisons of co-occurring

native and alien invasive plants: implications for conservation

and restoration. Á Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 34: 183Á211.

Debussche, M. and Isenmann, P. 1990. Introduced and cultivated

fleshy-fruited plants: consequences of a mutualistic Mediterra-

nean plantÁbird system. Á In: Di Castri, F. et al. (eds),

Biological invasions in Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

Kluwer, pp. 399Á416.

Denslow, J. S. 2003. Weeds in paradise: thoughts on the

invasibility of tropical islands. Á Ann. Miss. Bot. Gard. 90:

119Á127.


Drummond, B. A. 2005. The selection of native and invasive

plants by frugivorous birds in Maine. Á Northeastern Nat. 12:

33Á44.

Fleischmann, K. 1997. Invasion of alien woody plants on the



islands of Mahe´ and Silhouette, Seychelles. Á J. Veg. Sci. 8:

5Á12.


Friedmann, F. 1994. Flore des Seychelles. Á Orstom.

Gosper, C. R. 2004. Fruit characteristics of invasive bitou bush,

Chrysanthemoides monilifera (Asteraceae), and a comparison

with co-occuring native plant species. Á Aust. J. Bot. 52: 223Á

230.

Gosper, C. R. et al. 2005. Seed dispersal of fleshy-fruited invasive



plants by birds: contributing factors and management options.

Á Div. Distr. 11: 549Á558.

Gosper, C. R. et al. 2006. Reproductive ecology of invasive Ochna

serrulata (Ochnaceae) in southeastern Queensland. Á Aust. J.

Bot. 54: 43Á52.

Herrera, C. M. 1982. Seasonal variation in the quality of fruits and

diffuse coevolution between plants and avian dispersers.

Á Ecology 63: 773Á785.

Jordano, P. 1995. Angiosperm fleshy fruits and seed disperser: a

comparative analysis of adaptation and constraints in plantÁ

animal interactions. Á Am. Nat. 145: 163Á191.

Jordano, P. 2000. Fruits and frugivory. Á In: Fenner, M. (ed.),

Seeds: the ecology of regeneration in plant communities (2nd

ed.). CAB Int., pp. 125Á165.

Kueffer, C. 2006. Impacts of woody invasive species on tropical

forests of the Seychelles. ETH Diss., no. 16602, Dept of

Environ. Sci. Á ETH Zurich.

Kueffer, C. and Vos, P. 2004. Case studies on the status of invasive

woody plant species in the western Indian Ocean: 5.

Seychelles. Á For. Dept, FAO, UN.

Kueffer, C. and Zemp, S. 2004. Clidemia hirta (Fo Watouk): a

factsheet. Á Kapisen 1: 11Á13.

/

<

www.plantecology.ethz.ch/

publications/books/kapisen

/

>



Kueffer, C. et al. 2004. Case studies on the status of invasive

woody plant species in the western Indian Ocean. 1. Synthesis.

Á For. Dept, FAO, UN.

Levey, D. J. and Martinez del Rio, C. 2001. It takes guts (and

more) to eat fruit: lessons from avian nutritional ecology.

Á Auk 118: 819Á831.

Mandon-Dalger, I. et al. 2004. Relationships between alien plants

and an alien bird species on Reunion Island. Á J. Trop. Ecol.

20: 635Á642.

Meehan, H. J. et al. 2002. Potential disruptions to seed dispersal

mutualisms in Tonga, western Polynesia. Á J. Biogeogr. 29:

695Á712.


Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. 2003. Ecosystems and human

well-being: a framework for assessment. Á Island Press.

Moles, A. T. et al. 2008. A new framework for predicting invasive

plant species. Á J. Ecol. 96: 13Á17.

Neilan, W. et al. 2006. Do frugivorous birds assist rainforest

succession in weed dominated oldfield regrowth of subtropical

Australia? Á Biol. Conserv. 129: 393Á407.

Nelson, S. L. et al. 2000. Nutritional consequences of a change in

diet from native to agricultural fruits for the Samoan fruit bat.

Á Ecography 23: 393Á401.

Renne, I. J. et al. 2002. Generalized avian dispersal syndrome

contributes to Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum,

Euphorbiaceae) invasiveness. Á Div. Distr. 8: 285Á295.

Richardson, D. M. et al. 2000. Plant invasions Á the role of

mutualisms. Á Biol. Rev. 75: 65Á93.

Sallabanks, R. 1993. Fruiting plant attractiveness to avian seed

dispersers: native vs invasive Crataegus in western Oregon.

Á Madrono 40: 108Á116.

Sauer, J. D. 1967. Plants and man on the Seychelles coast. A study

in historical biogeography. Á Univ. of Wisconsin Press.

Schumacher, E. et al. 2008. Influence of drought and shade on

seedling growth of native and invasive trees in the Seychelles.

Á Biotropica 40: 543Á549.

Schumacher, E. et al. 2009. Influence of light and nutrient

conditions on seedling growth of native and invasive trees in

the Seychelles. Á Biol. Invas. Doi: 10.1007/s10530-008-9371-6.

Snow, D. W. 1981. Tropical frugivorous birds and their food

plants: a world survey. Á Biotropica 13: 1Á14.

Stoddart, D. R. (ed.) 1984. Biogeography and ecology of the

Seychelles Islands. Á Junk Publishers.

1333


Traveset, A. and Richardson, D. M. 2006. Biological invasions as

disruptors of plant reproductive mutualisms. Á Trends Ecol.

Evol. 21: 208Á216.

Vila, M. and D’Antonio, C. M. 1998. Fruit choice and seed

dispersal of invasive vs. noninvasive Carpobrotus (Aizoaceae) in

coastal California. Á Ecology 79: 1053Á1060.

Von Holle, B. and Simberloff, D. 2005. Ecological resistance to

biological invasion overwhelmed by propagule pressure.

Á Ecology 86: 3212Á3218.

von Lengerken, J. 2004. Qualita¨t und Qualita¨tskontrolle bei

Futtermitteln. Á Deutscher Fachverein.

Vos, P. 2004. Case studies on the status of invasive woody plant

species in the western Indian Ocean: 2. The Comoros

archipelago (Union of the Comoros and Mayotte). Á For.

Dept, FAO, UN.

Watt, B. K. and Muriel, A. L. 1963. Composition of foods. Á US

Dept Agriculture.

White, D. W. and Stiles, E. W. 1992. Bird dispersal of fruits

introduced to eastern North America. Á Can. J. Bot. 70: 1689Á

1696.


Whittaker, R. J. 1998. Island biogeography. Ecology, evolution

and conservation. Á Oxford Univ. Press.

Williams, P. A. and Karl, B. J. 1996. Fleshy fruits of indigenous

and adventive plants in the diet of birds in forest remnants,

Nelson, New Zealand. Á N. Z. J. Ecol. 20: 127Á145.

Witmer, M. C. and Van Soest, P. J. 1998. Contrasting digestive



strategies of fruit-eating birds. Á Funct. Ecol. 12: 728Á741.

1334


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə