Woody Density Phase 1 State of Knowledge Jugo Ilic Doug Boland Maurice McDonald Geoff Downes and Philip Blakemore



Yüklə 262.54 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/22
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü262.54 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   22

Australian Greenhouse Office
8
Page
Line
Correction
(Delete = delete this line)
(Replace  = replace existing line with the following)
Scientific Name
Sub-Species
Name Notes
Confidence in data (H,M.L)
Data reference
Tr
ee age (mature/age)
Common Names
Number of trees tested
Basic Density (kg/m
3
)
95% Probability Range for Mean
Estimated Basic Density from Air
-dr
y (12%) MC
Estimated 95% Probability Range for Mean
Number of trees tested
Air
-dr
y density (12% MC) before reconditioning (g/cm3)
95% Probability Range for Mean
Number of trees tested
Air
-dr
y density (12% MC) after reconditioning (g/cm3)
95% Probability Range for Mean
Green density (g/cm
3
)
SD
Green Moisture Content (%)
SD
Area W
eighted Density
Data on BD & tree height
Comprehensive Species list
NSW
Victoria
Queensland
South Australia
Tasmania
W
estern Australia
(Ref. within W
A
)
Northern T
e
rritor
y
Australian Capital T
e
rritor
y
Australia
Abundance (1,2,3,4,5) See Appendix 2
National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report
9

National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report 10
Australian Greenhouse Office
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Title
Shrinkage and density of
Australian and other South-west
Pacific woods
Shrinkage and density of
Australian and other South-east
Pacific woods
The anatomy of Eucalypt woods
Australian timbers: Volume two
Queensland Timbers: Their
nomenclature, density and lyctid
susceptibility.
The mechanical properties of
174 Australian timbers
The mechanical properties of
Australian, New Guinea and
other timbers
Goldfields timber: Research report
An assessment of the kraft
pulping properties of residual
mature eucalypt roundwood from
East Gippsland
Kraft pulping of East Gippsland
eucalypt regrowth
Density and shrinkage of four low
rainfall plantation grown eucalypts
Wood densities for fifty-two
Australian tree species
Wood in Australia: Types,
properties and uses
Where to shoot your pilodyn:
Within tree variation in basic
density in plantations of
Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens
in Tasmania
Notes
Division of Forest Products
Technological Paper No 13.
Division of Building Research
Technical Papers (Second Series)
No. 38
Forest Products Laboratory:
Division of Applied Chemistry
Technological Paper No. 66
Technical Pamphlet No.2
Division of Forest Products
Technological Paper No. 25
Bulletin No. 279
Department of Commerce and Trade;
Goldfields Esperance Development
Commission; Department of
Conservartion and Land
Management; Goldfields Specialty
Timber Industry Group Inc. and
Curtin University, Kalgoorlie Campus
Appita Vol. 44 No. 4
Appita Vol. 44 No. 6
Unpublished data
CSIRO Technical Report
New Forests 15: 205-221
Year
1961
1981
1972
1999
1989
1963
1957
1999
1990
1991
2000
1994
1983
1998
Organisation
CSIRO
CSIRO
CSIRO
Department of
Natural Resources,
Queensland
Department of
Forestry,
Queensland
CSIRO
CSIRO
Research Project
Steering Committee
CSIRO
CSIRO
CSIRO
CSIRO
McGraw – Hill Book
Company Australia
CSIRO
Author
Kingston R.S.T. and
Risdon C.J.E.
Budgen B.
Dadswell H.E. 
Fairbairn E.
compiled by
Cause M.L., Rudder
E.J. and Kynaston W.T. 
Bolza E. and Kloot N.H.
Stewart A.M. and
Kloot N.H.
Siemon G.R. and
Kealley I.G.
Mamers H., Balodis V.,
Garland C.P., Langfors
N.G., Menz D.N.J. and
Chin C.W.J.
Mamers H., Balodis V.,
Garland C.P., Langfors
N.G. and Menz D.N.J. 
Blakemore P.
Davis B. 
Bootle K.R.
Raymond C.A. and
MacDonald A.C.
Data reference number
References

WOODY DENSITY PHASE 1 
- STATE OF KNOWLEDGE
Jugo Ilic, Doug Boland, Maurice McDonald
Geoff Downes and Philip Blakemore
CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products
National Carbon Accounting System 
Technical Report No. 18
October 2000
The Australian Greenhouse Office is the lead Commonwealth agency on greenhouse matters.

Printed in Australia for the Australian Greenhouse Office.
© Commonwealth of Australia 2000 
This work is copyright.   It may be reproduced in whole or part for study or training
purposes subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgment of the source 
and no commercial usage or sale results.   Reproduction for purposes other than
those listed above requires the written permission of the Communications Team,
Australian Greenhouse Office.   Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and
rights should be addressed to the Communications Team, Australian Greenhouse
Office, GPO Box 621, CANBERRA ACT  2601.
For additional copies of this document please contact National Mailing 
& Marketing.  Telephone: 1300 130 606.  Facsimile: (02) 6299 6040.  
Email: nmm@nationalmailing.com.au  
For further information please contact the National Carbon Accounting System 
at http://www.greenhouse.gov.au/ncas/
Neither the Commonwealth nor the Consultants responsible for undertaking this
project accepts liability for the accuracy of or inferences from the material contained
in this publication, or for any action as a result of any person's or group's
interpretations, deductions, conclusions or actions in reliance on this material.
October 2000
Environment Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication
Woody Density Phase I - State of Knowledge / Jugo Ilic …[et al.]
p. cm.
(National Carbon Accounting System technical report; no. 18)
Bibliography: 
ISSN: 14426838 
1. Wood-Density-Measurement. 2. Trees-Australia-Density. 3. Forests and forestry-
Australia-Geographical distribution.  I. Ilic, Jugo. II. Australian Greenhouse Office.
III. Series
634.97’0994-dc21
581.498-dc21
Australian Greenhouse Office
ii

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1. OBJECTIVES
The Australian Greenhouse Office (AGO) contracted
CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products (FFP) to
examine the wood density of Australian tree species
for use in the National Carbon Accounting System.
This consultancy will be undertaken in two stages
with this report incorporating the outputs from the
first stage.  The objectives of the first stage were:

to list the available wood density
information for Australian tree species;

to provide an indication of species
distribution and representation;

to list the Australian tree species where
density is not available; and 

to provide a methodology for evaluating
wood density.
The second stage of the project will include the
determination of wood densities of tree species
where density information is lacking.  Obviously
this second stage of the project is reliant on the
outcomes of the first stage, and the species to be
sampled will be agreed with the AGO.  
2. KEY OUTCOMES
The major outcomes of the first stage of the study
are:
1.
Basic density data have been provided for
approximately 590 Australian tree species
and these are presented in Appendix 1.  The
data was derived from 14 different
published sources with varying levels of
reliability in the values, ranging from low to
high.  Only published sources that quoted
variation of wood density were denoted as
highly reliable.  
2.
Descriptive and functional methodologies
have been presented for the direct
determination of wood density by
gravimetric and maximum moisture
methods, which can be used to obtain
whole tree stem estimates of wood density.
A methodology has also been presented for
the indirect determination of wood density
using pin penetration (pilodyn), which
needs to be calibrated using direct
determination of wood density.  The
indirect method provides less accuracy for
individual trees, but does allow many
estimates of wood density to be taken
quickly, and it can be potentially useful for
ranking trees into broad density classes
within sites.  Within these broad density
classes the class means can be used for
comparing site densities.
3. 
Species distribution maps for native
hardwood species that are harvested
commercially (10 species), and for major
plantation species, are provided.  This
addresses the item "distribution and
representation in the Australian landscape
of key species" in the Terms of Reference for
the consultancy.  
No attempt was made to estimate average wood
densities of whole trees or forest structural classes
or regions of Australia.  Where tree species quoted
95% probability ranges for their density, these data
are taken to represent whole tree variation
(Kingston and Risdon 1961).  
Most States appear to have good statistics for the
main commercial species harvested.  Information
available on the minor species being harvested is
less well documented.  The report does not include
data on tree species removed through clearing on
private land due to a lack of comprehensive
information.  This particularly applies to the large
areas currently being cleared in Queensland. 
National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report
iii

3. RECOMMENDATIONS
The data gaps identified in this report should be
addressed in the second stage of this project.  The
second stage of the project should proceed to:

Categorise forest types by structure or
geographic region;

Identify 5-10 key species within each forest
category; and

Determine wood density for each of those
key species, where the data is missing.  
Australian Greenhouse Office
iv

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page No.
Executive Summary
iii
1.
Objectives
iii
2.
Key outcomes
iii
3.
Recommendations
iv
1.
Introduction
1
1.1 Overall Terms of Reference
1
2.
Basic Density and why it is important
1
2.1 Determination of Basic Density
2
2.2 Calculation of basic density Water-immersion
3
2.2.1 Equipment and Procedure
3
2.2.2 Procedure for water displacement determinations
3
2.3 Maximum saturation
4
2.4 Nondestructive estimation using the Pilodyn
4
2.4.1 Calibration and use of the Pilodyn
5
3.
Estimating wood density of whole trees (Whole tree correlations)
5
3.1
Background:
5
3.2
Sampling protocol
6
3.3
Necessary site data
6
3.4
Obtaining the sample
7
3.5
Destructive sampling
7
3.6
Sampling using 12 mm increment cores
7
3.7
How many to sample
7
3.8
Where to sample
7
3.9
How to take an increment core sample
8
3.10 Sample coding
8
3.11 Steps in non-destructive sampling using a motorised corer
9
3.12 Sample storage
9
3.13 Time required for field sampling
9
3.14 Building the calibration
10
3.15 Explanatory notes
10
4.
What do we need to know (Priority)?
11
5.
References
12
Appendix 1
13
1.
List of taxa with available density data
13
1.1
References for available density data
13
2.
List of taxa for which no density data is available
170
Appendix 2
175
1.
Australian Native Forest Tree Species Harvested Commercially 
(Terms of reference relevant to this part of the consultancy) 
175
2.
Method
175
2.1
A list of common tree species.
175
National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report
v

2.2   Species commercially harvested in each State
175
2.3   Plantation eucalypts
176
2.4   Forest biomass inventory: through the incorporation of  wood density values for 
common species.
176
3.
Results
176
3.1   Natural and commercial species
176
3.2   Commercial hardwood plantations
205
4.
Conclusions
212
Appendix 3
213
1.
Species distribution maps
213
LIST OF TABLES
Appendix 2
Table 1.
List of common species in Australia (supplied by Mr. Arthur Court).  Column 1 lists 
those common species in the “Australia’s State of Forest Report” whilst Columns 2-6 
list those species commonly harvested in State Forests in Australia.
177
Table 2.
Indigenous hardwood and Callitris timber species commonly harvested in NSW including 
volumes and proportion of the total harvest for 1998/99.
206
Table 3.
Indigenous hardwood timber species harvested in WA from state forests and private property.
207
Table 4.
Indigenous hardwood timber species harvested from State Forests in Victoria.
208
Table 5.
Indigenous hardwood/softwood timber species harvested from State Forests in Tasmania 
in 1998/99.  (Information from Mr Michael Wood.)
209
Table 6a.
Indigenous timber species harvested from State Forests in Queensland in 1998/99.  Includes 
Hardwoods and Callitris.  (Information from Mr C. Bragg).
210
Table 6b.
Sawlog yields from crown forests in Queensland from 1 July 1999 - 30 June 2000.
210
Table 7.
Areas planted to hardwood plantations by State (data from BRS, March 2000).
211
Table 8.
Areas planted by tree species up till 1994 and estimates of proportion of species planted 
in 1994 and 2000.
212
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1.
Example of a temperature controlled oven for drying sections.
3
Figure 2.
Diagram of water displacement method for measuring volume.
4
Figure 3.
Pilodyn tester used for estimating basic density in a eucalypt log.
5
Australian Greenhouse Office
vi

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 OVERALL TERMS OF REFERENCE.
The Australian Greenhouse Office (AGO) has
contracted the CSIRO Division of Forestry and
Forest Products to review the availability of wood
density information for common Australian tree
species.
The first stage of the consultancy requires a review
of available information.  This review report will
contain:

A list of tree species where wood densities
are available;

A list of tree species where wood densities
are not available;

The distribution and representation in the
Australian landscape of key species.  This
has been  interpreted to mean the
production of species distribution maps for
the key species being harvested (about 10
species); and

Specific analytical methods by which any
further derivation of wood densities should
be determined.
The second stage (which should be separately
costed) should contain a proposed fee structure for
the determination of wood densities (on a per
species/sample or equivalent basis).  The species to
be sampled will be agreed with the Office on
completion of the first stage report.  The final report
for this second stage will contain the wood densities
for each species sampled.
To complete the second stage of the work greater
consideration will have to be given to determining
average density values for particular forest
"categories" (see Appendix 2; Methods and
Conclusion).  The task then is to list the 5-10 key
species for each category and make sure that wood
density values are available for each of those key
species. 
2. BASIC DENSITY AND WHY IT IS
IMPORTANT
An estimate of the amount of carbon locked up in
forested land including native forests and
plantations is necessary for accounting of net carbon
emissions within Australia.  A major component of
carbon storage is in the woody stem and an estimate
of the total carbon can be gained from a knowledge
of the wood basic density comprising the stem and
the total volume it occupies.  
Wood density is a complex physical property since
the tissue is made up of differing proportions of
cells of variable size and chemical composition.
These variations depend on the species and its
interactions with the environment.  Generally
density from mature trees is higher than that from
young trees.  Density varies in trees from pith to
bark and from base to apex and it is affected by tree
age.  Similarly wood density of branches is likely to
vary, but little information is available.  To
determine the total amount of carbon locked up in
woody tissue, a knowledge of both the volume and
the density of that tissue is required.  
The majority of studies looking at density variation
have been on commercial timbers, predominantly
plantation species.  Little or no data are available on
patterns of variation in non-commercial species.
The studies on plantation species have indicated the
following important factors.
1. 
Wood density varies from base to apex.  The
pattern appears to differ between softwoods
(radiata pine) and hardwoods (eucalypts).
Density has a cylindrical symmetry in
softwoods (see description in Downes et al.
1997) resulting in a reduction in density
with height.  In eucalypts the pattern
appears to be more conical with the
interaction between the radial and
longitudinal variation allowing density to
remain constant or increase with height.
Usually based on studies with plantation
species the general pattern appears to be a
National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report
1

gradual increase with height.  Many very
useful references to studies on density
variation of eucalypts are given in Hillis
and Brown (1984).
2. 
Wood density in trees appears to be
controlled more by a combination of
environmental factors than by its radial
growth rate.  Rainfall affects density
variation.  Application of fertiliser results in
decreases in average wood density whereas
the effects of thinning are variable (Hillis
and Brown 1984).
3. 
Annual ring average density generally
increases from pith to bark in all species
(softwood and hardwood) with the rate and
pattern of increase dependent upon species
and growth pattern.  Growth pattern
reflects the proportions of the ring that is
produced at different times of the year
which controls the average density of the
ring.  In general, increasing growth rate will
result in more wood production in spring.
This wood tends to have a lower density,
and therefore faster growth rate generally
results in lower annual ring density.
Rainfall appears to have a dominant effect.
It is clear that the method of sampling can affect the
data obtained and its interpretation.  For sampling
to be most effective, there needs to be a clear
understanding of why the samples are being taken,
and how they are going to be analysed.  The choice
of methods for sampling and analysis of wood
properties should consider the need to interpret the
resultant data within the context of existing
scientific literature (Downes et al. 1997). 
2.1 DETERMINATION OF BASIC DENSITY
Basic density is expressed as the ratio of the weight
of the oven dry sample to its green volume.  The
physical units used for the quantities are usually
(kg) for the dry mass, and (m
3
) for the wood
volume.  
The measurement of wood density has traditionally
involved the collection of wood samples (e.g. disks
or increment cores) and subsequent laboratory
determinations of weights and volumes. 
The water-immersion method and the maximum-
saturation method are two direct methods for
determining the basic density.  Both methods
require a specific specimen to be measured.  The
water-displacement method requires the evaluation
of weights and volumes whereas the maximum
moisture method only requires the evaluation of
specimen weights, but the green sample must be
initially fully water saturated.  However, by
necessity both direct methods are partially
destructive in that a sample needs to be removed
from a tree for evaluation.
In another approach, a pilodyn wood tester
originally designed for assessing soft rot in wooden
poles can be used to obtain an indirect measure of
wood density.  The instrument fires a blunt, spring-
loaded steel pin into the wood with known energy.
The depth of pin penetration is noted from a scale
on the body of the instrument.  Depth of pin
penetration has been shown to be negatively
correlated with wood basic density for several
species of gymnosperms as well as angiosperms
(Cown 1981; Moura et al. 1987; Ilic and Bennett
2000).  Trials with the pilodyn have shown to be
rapid and less liable to operator bias.  The accuracy
is less for individual trees.  The best potential use of
the instrument would be for ranking trees into
broad density classes within sites, and then use class
means for comparing site densities. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   22


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə