Woody Density Phase 1 State of Knowledge Jugo Ilic Doug Boland Maurice McDonald Geoff Downes and Philip Blakemore



Yüklə 262.54 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə4/22
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü262.54 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   22

3.14 Building the calibration
Objective:  To determine a whole tree weighted
density for each of the destructively sampled trees
and obtain a regression equation relating increment
core density in these trees to whole tree density.
This equation can then be used to determine whole
tree density.  
1. 
Examine the pattern of density variation
with height in each tree.
2. 
Determine the whole tree volume from the
disk areas and tree height.
3. 
Using tree height, disk diameter and
sampling point data determine the stem
volume represented by each disk.  
4. 
Using this data, weigh the density data
from each disk to obtain a whole tree
density value.
5. 
Determine the regression equation between
the whole tree density and the increment
core density.  [Note:  a poor correlation
indicates large within and between tree
variation, requiring an increase in the
number of trees sampled.]
6. 
Use the regression equation to estimate the
whole tree density and volumes of the trees
sampled non-destructively.
3.15 Explanatory notes
1. 
There is no quicker way to do this at this
stage, given the scarcity of available
information.  The lack of fundamental
understanding of wood property variation
makes this calibration procedure essential
for realistic predictions.  Quicker methods
for density estimation (e.g. Pilodyn): (a) still
require calibration; and (b) are considerably
more variable requiring the sampling of
greater tree numbers for a given level of
accuracy (see Table 2.4 in Downes et al.
1997).
2. 
The basis for selecting the number of
samples required is explained in Downes et
al. (1997).  If the coefficient of variation in
density between trees is low, then fewer
trees may be required.  This may be the case
on sites where growth is slow and the
genetic diversity is small.  The destructive
sampling currently addresses stem density
only.  The background for including
branches in the estimate is unknown at this
stage.  Some investigators have noted that
total tree volume (stem and branch) can be
estimated by treating the tree as a cylinder,
multiplying breast height area by tree
height.  It is said that his was first
suggested by Leonardo da Vinci (no
references available).
3. 
In sampling plantation species we have
recommended including a 50% height
sample.  In the interests of increasing speed
and limiting costs we believe sampling at
the 4 percentage heights indicated will not
result in a significant loss of accuracy.
Before cutting discs, examine stems carefully
for the presence of defects.  These defects
indicate localised disturbances in density
and can result in marked anomalies in the
data set, and result in poor correlations.
Avoiding branch stubs and deformities is
more important than taking samples at the
exact heights.  These discs are used to
represent a section of the trunk, not an
individual point (i.e. the 40% disc
represents the section of tree between 25
and 55% of tree height).
Australian Greenhouse Office
10

4. WHAT DO WE NEED TO KNOW (PRIORITY)?
The following appear to be major priority issues for
the wood densities:
1. 
Wood density values for all major species
harvested in the natural forest are required.
(Check tables of species harvested with
density database to indicate where major
species are not represented.  We would then
recommend that density evaluations be
carried out for those species).
2.
Wood density values for major plantation
species both natural forest and in
plantations are required.  In the absence of
data, this would need to be carried out for
material from plantations of different age.
The key plantation species for Australia:
E. globulus, E. nitens, E. grandis, E. pilularis
and E. regnans. In addition, Corymbia
maculata, C. variegata and E. dunnii need to
be added as emerging species of
importance.  (There is little data on young
C. variegata and E. dunnii so this would be
highly desirable.)  It is expected that there
may be differences between densities in
natural forest trees and plantation trees of
the same species.
Furthermore, there may be a case for
investigating wood density of E. globulus
grown in different environments, e.g.
Green triangle and WA.  It is quite likely
that some of these data are being actively
collected in other studies and some effort
may need to be made to find out what is
available.
3.
Our knowledge of key species cleared on
farmlands in central Queensland is limited
to Acacia harpophylla (brigalow).  A priority
is to identify an additional five key species
and ensure density data is available.
4.
Many of the dryland species are likely to
fall in the same catgory as A. harpophylla
indicated above.  Exhaustive sampling of
such material would be prohibitive, but
indicative data may be obtained from
assumed similarities of anatomical structure
among the taxa.  In addition, approximate
densities can be obtained from suitable
material from the CSIRO Division of
Forestry and Forest Products Dadswell
Memorial Wood Collection.
National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report
11

Australian Greenhouse Office
12
5. REFERENCES
Cown, D.J. (1981)  Use of the pilodyn wood tester for
estimating wood density in standing trees – influence of
site and tree age. 7XVII IUFRO World Forestry
Cinference, Kyoto, Japan, September 1981.
Downes, G.M., Hudson, I.L., Raymond, C.A., Dean,
G.H., Michell, A.J., Schimleck, L.S, Evans, R. &
Muneri, A. (1997) Sampling plantation eucalypts for
wood and fibre properties. CSIRO Publishing,
Melbourne, Australia.
Hillis, W.E. and Brown, A.G.  (1984)  Eucalypts for
wood production. Academic Press.  pp 434. 
Ilic, J. & Bennett, P.J.  (2000)  Sorting eucalypt logs and
boards to facilitate drying. Proc. IUFRO, The Future of
Eucalypts for Wood Producs, Tasmania, Australia.
Moura, V.P.G., Barnes, R.D. & Birks, J.S. (1987)  A
comparison of three methods of assessing wood density in
provenances of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Denhnh. and
other eucalyptus species in Brazil.  Auatralian Forest
Research 17: 83- 90.
Northcote, K.N.  (1979)  A Factual Key for the
recognition of Australian Soils. Rellim Technical
Publications Pty Ltd, Adelaide, Australia.
Raymond, C. A. & MacDonald, A.C. (1998)  Where to
shoot your pilodyn: within tree variation in basic density
in plantation grown Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens in
Tasmania.  New Forests 15: 205-221.

APPENDIX 1
1. LIST OF TAXA WITH AVAILABLE DENSITY
DATA
See over page.
1.1 References for available density data.
Bootle, K. R. (1983). Wood in Australia:  Types,
properties and uses. Book.
Bolza, E. & Kloot N. H. (1963). The mechanical
properties of 174 Australian Timbers. CSIRO Division
of Forest Products Technological Paper No 25.
Budgen, B. (1981). Shrinkage and density of Australian
and other South-east Pacific woods.  CSIRO Division of
Building Research Technical Papers (Second Series)
No 38.
Cause, M.L., Rudder, E. J. & Kynaston, W. T. (1989).
Queensland Timbers: Their nomenclature, Density and
Lyctid Susceptibility. Department of Forestry,
Queensland Technical Pamphlet No.2.
Dadswell, H.E. (1972). The anatomy of Eucalypt Woods.
CSIRO Forest Products Laboratory: Division of
Applied Chemistry Technological Paper No. 66.
Davis, B. (1994). Wood densities for fifty-two Australian
tree species. CSIRO Technical Report.
Fairbairn, E. (1999). Australian Timbers: Volume two.
Department of Natural Resources, Queensland.
Kingston R.S.T. and Risdon C.J.E., 1961. Shrinkage
and density of Australian and other South-west Pacific
woods. CSIRO Division of Forest Products
Technological Paper No 13.
Mamers, H., Balodis, V., Garland, C. P., Langford,
N.G. & Menz, D.N.J. (2000). Kraft pulping of East
Gippsland eucalypt regrowth. CSIRO Unpublished data.
Mamers, H., Balodis, V., Garland, C.P., Langford
N.G., Menz D.N.J. & Chin, C.W.J. (1990). An
assessment of the kraft pulping properties of residual
mature eucalypt roundwood from East Gippsland.
CSIRO Appita Vol. 44 No. 4.
Raymond, C. A. & MacDonald, A. C. (1998). Where to
shoot your pilodyn: within tree variation in basic density
in plantations of Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens in
Tasmania. CSIRO New Forests 15: 205-221.
Siemon, G. R. & Kealley, I. G. (1999). Goldfields
Timber: Research Report. Research Project Steering
Committee. Dept of Commerce and Trade;
Goldfields Esperance Development Commission;
Department of Conservation and Land Management;
Goldfields Specialty Timber Industry Group Inc.;
Curtin University, Kalgoorlie Campus.
Stewart, A. M. & Kloot N. H. (1957). The Mechanical
Properties of Australian, New Guinea and Other Timbers,
CSIRO Bulletin No. 279.
National Carbon Accounting System Technical Report
13

Abarema grandiflora
Abarema sapindoides
Abrophyllum ornans
Acacia acradenia
Acacia acuminata
Acacia acuminata
Acacia adsurgens
Acacia adunca
Acacia ampliceps
Acacia aneura
Acacia aneura
Acacia aneura
Acacia aneura
Acacia aneura
Acacia aneura
Acacia aneura
Acacia argyraea
Acacia arundefflana
Acacia atkinsiana
Acacia aulacocarpa
Acacia aulacocarpa
Acacia aulacocarpa
Acacia aulacocarpa
Acacia aulococarpa
Acacia auriculiformis
Acacia baileyana
Acacia baked
Acacia bancroftii
Acacia beckleri
Acacia bidwillii
Acacia binervata
Acacia binervia
Acacia bivenosa
Acacia bivenosa
Acacia blakei
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
5
5
12
1
8
12
12
4
5
8
8
8
8
12
5
12
1
5
6
12
5
5
5
12
12
12
1
3
2
1
1
10
25
25
10
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
899
1171
911
1035
1012
1157
1213
890
604
860
670
650
620
872-950
1,016-1,054
1,007-1,017
510
500
810
790
530
900
770
700
640
560
550
700
430 - 690
1
3
1
1
10
25
25
1
3
5
625
610
1050
1038
1030
660
1101
1200
1203
1192
1000
895
716
800
689.6
675
895
1,043-1,159
1,184-1,222
1,185-1,199
532-848
Siris, Tulip
Siris, Tulip
Jam, Raspberry
Jam
Mulga
Mulga
Mulga
Mulga, Weeping
Mulga
Mulga
Mulga
Wattle, Ferny
Salwood, Brown
Salwood, Brown
Salwood, Brown
Salwood, Brown
Salwood, Brown
Wattle, Black
Wattle, White
Australian Greenhouse Office
14
Scientific Name 
Sub-Species
Name Notes
Confidence in data (H,M.L)
Common Names
Number of trees tested
Basic Density (kg/m
3
)
Tree a
g
e (mature/a
g
e)
Data ref
erence
95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Estimated Basic Density fr
om Air
-dr
y (12%) MC
95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Estimated 95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Number of trees tested
Air
-dr
y density (12%MC) bef
ore reconditiong (g/cm
3
)
var. macrocarpa

National
Carbon Accounting System 
T
e
c
hnical Repor
t
1
5
Number of trees tested
Air-dry density (12%MC) after reconditiong (g/cm
3
)
95% Probability Range for Mean
Abundance (1,2,3,4,5) See Appendix 2
Australia
Australian Capital Territory
Northern Territory
(Ref.within WA)
Western Australia
Tasmania
South Australia
Queensland
Victoria
N.S.W.
Data on BD & tree height
Comprehensive Species list
Area Weighted Density
SD
Green Moisture Content (%)
SD
Green density (g/cm
3
)
3
3
1035
716
1188
1344
1315
88.5
32
24
26.7
29.9
30.0
3.40
3.00
1.80
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
11
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Goldfields
CALM 
Como
CALM 
Har
vey
Goongarrie
Leonora

Acacia boormanii
Acacia brachystachya
Acacia brachystachya
Acacia burkittii
Acacia burrowii
Acacia buxifolia
Acacia caerulescens
Acacia calamifolia
Acacia calcicola
Acacia cambagei
Acacia cambagei
Acacia cambagei
Acacia cambagei
Acacia cambagei
Acacia chisholmii
Acacia chisholmii
Acacia cibaria
Acacia cincinnata
Acacia citrinovirdis
Acacia citrinovirdis
Acacia cognata
Acacia complanata
Acacia concurrens
Acacia coolgardiensis
Acacia coriacea
Acacia coriacea
Acacia craspedocarpa
Acacia crassa
Acacia crassicarpa
Acacia crassicarpa
Acacia crassicarpa
Acacia crassicarpa
Acacia cultriformis
Acacia cunninghamii
Acacia cuthbertsonii
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
12
12
5
1
4
5
6
12
12
12
12
12
5
4
12
8
1
5
6
12
5
1,000
750
690
550
690
3
10
5
1
10
5
1260
1283
1345
1240
960
880
1099
670
675
880
1,259-1,307
1,171-1,309
1,046-1,152
573-767
Wattle, Burrow's
Gidgee
Gidgee
Gidgee
Gidgee
Curracabah
Mulga, Hop
Wattle, Northern Territory
Salwood, Brown
Wattle, Northern Territory
Curracabah
Australian Greenhouse Office
16
Scientific Name 
Sub-Species
Name Notes
Confidence in data (H,M.L)
Common Names
Number of trees tested
Basic Density (kg/m
3
)
Tree a
g
e (mature/a
g
e)
Data ref
erence
95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Estimated Basic Density fr
om Air
-dr
y (12%) MC
95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Estimated 95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Number of trees tested
Air
-dr
y density (12%MC) bef
ore reconditiong (g/cm
3
)
1
1
3
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
6
5
5
4
1010
970
1008
1016
1131.2
1050
760
810
880
886
960
1030
578
617.6
610
995-1,037
858-914
496-660
600-635
432-788

National
Carbon Accounting System 
T
e
c
hnical Repor
t
1
7
Number of trees tested
Air-dry density (12%MC) after reconditiong (g/cm
3
)
95% Probability Range for Mean
Abundance (1,2,3,4,5) See Appendix 2
Australia
Australian Capital Territory
Northern Territory
(Ref.within WA)
Western Australia
Tasmania
South Australia
Queensland
Victoria
N.S.W.
Data on BD & tree height
Comprehensive Species list
Area Weighted Density
SD
Green Moisture Content (%)
SD
Green density (g/cm
3
)
3
5
1220
668
573-763
1354
1206
24
86
26.4
24.6
4.70
4.20
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Adelong
1
1
1

Acacia cyclops
Acacia cyperophylla
Acacia dealbata
Acacia dealbata
Acacia dealbata
Acacia deanei
Acacia decora
Acacia decurrens
Acacia dentifera
Acacia dictyophleba
Acacia difficilis
Acacia difficilis
Acacia dimidiata
Acacia disparrima
Acacia doratoxylon
Acacia dunnii
Acacia elata
Acacia eriopoda
Acacia estrophiolata
Acacia excelsa
Acacia excelsa
Acacia falcata
Acacia falciformis
Acacia farnesiana
Acacia fasciculifera
Acacia fascuculifera
Acacia filicifolia
Acacia fimbriata
Acacia floribunda
Acacia frigescens
Acacia georginae
Acacia glaucocarpa
Acacia gonocarpa
Acacia gonoclada
Acacia grasbyi
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
1
5
6
5
5
12
12
12
5
12
4
5
5
5
12
8
570
520
700
710
720
830
850
710
8
6
1
1
10
710
705
667.2
640
885
910
915
1122
1090
1120
900
605-815
504-830
1,062-1,182
Wattle, Silver
Wattle, Silver
Wattle, Silver
Wattle, Deane's
Wattle, Green
Lancewood, Brown
Wattle, Ironwood
Wattle, Ironwood
Wattle, Rose
Gidgee,  Georgina
Miniritchie
Australian Greenhouse Office
18
Scientific Name 
Sub-Species
Name Notes
Confidence in data (H,M.L)
Common Names
Number of trees tested
Basic Density (kg/m
3
)
Tree a
g
e (mature/a
g
e)
Data ref
erence
95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Estimated Basic Density fr
om Air
-dr
y (12%) MC
95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Estimated 95% Pr
obability Rang
e f
or Mean
Number of trees tested
Air
-dr
y density (12%MC) bef
ore reconditiong (g/cm
3
)
8
6
1
1
1
1
10
4
9
583
569.6
770
900
908
780
1199
500-666
445-694
864-952
595-965

National
Carbon Accounting System 
T
e
c
hnical Repor
t
1
9
Number of trees tested
Air-dry density (12%MC) after reconditiong (g/cm
3
)
95% Probability Range for Mean
Abundance (1,2,3,4,5) See Appendix 2
Australia
Australian Capital Territory
Northern Territory
(Ref.within WA)
Western Australia
Tasmania
South Australia
Queensland
Victoria
N.S.W.
Data on BD & tree height
Comprehensive Species list
Area Weighted Density
SD
Green Moisture Content (%)
SD
Green density (g/cm
3
)
8
703
599-807
1284
52
37.5
7.10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Payne's 
Find
1
1
1

Acacia grasbyi
Acacia grasbyii
Acacia hakeoides
Acacia hammondii
Acacia harpophylla
Acacia harpophylla
Acacia harpophylla
Acacia harpophylla
Acacia hemignosta
Acacia hemsleyi
Acacia holosericea
Acacia holosericea
Acacia homalophylla
Acacia howittii
Acacia humifusa
Acacia implexa
Acacia implexa
Acacia irrorata
Acacia iteaphylla
Acacia jennerae
Acacia julifera
Acacia jutsonii
Acacia kempeana
Acacia kettlewelliae
Acacia laccata
Acacia lamprocarpa
Acacia lasiocalyx
Acacia latifolia
Acacia leiocalyx
Acacia leprosa
Acacia leptocarpa
Acacia leptostachya
Acacia leucoclada
Acacia ligulata
Acacia linearis
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
12
8
1
2
5
12
12
12
12
12
5
1
5
5
8
12
8
5
5
790
600
700
930
640
520
660
16
3
6
1
1
4
1
1230
1099
1053
1025
750
890
1235
689
800
640
840
1,215-1,245
1,009-1,097
Miniritchie
Brigalow
Brigalow
Brigalow
Brigalow
Yarran
Lightwood
Lightwood
Wattle, Green
Wattle, Silver
Curracabah
Wattle, Narrow-Leaved
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   22


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə