᭧ 2002 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists



Yüklə 107,72 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix10.07.2017
ölçüsü107,72 Kb.

᭧ 2002 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists

Copeia, 2002(1), pp. 195–198

Defensive Behavior of Cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus)

toward Humans

J. W


HITFIELD

G

IBBONS AND



M

ICHAEL


E. D

ORCAS


Venomous snakes are often perceived as aggressive antagonists, with the North

American cottonmouth having a particularly notorious reputation for such villainy.

We designed tests to measure the suite of behavioral responses by free-ranging cot-

tonmouths to encounters with humans. When confronted, 23 (51%) of 45 tested

tried to escape, and 28 (78%) of 36 tested used threat displays and other defensive

tactics; only 13 of 36 cottonmouths bit an artificial hand used in the tests. Our

findings challenge conventional wisdom about aggressive behavior in an animal per-

ceived as more dangerous than it is. Changing irrational negative attitudes about

venomous snakes is a necessary step toward quelling the recently documented global

decline in reptiles.

V

ENOMOUS snakes have a reputation



among the general public as being aggres-

sive when approached by humans (Klauber,

1972). Attitudes about potential harm from hos-

tile behavior of venomous snakes extend to

some biologists, including even a suggestion

that natural selection has operated through

‘‘biocultural evolution’’ in developing an innate

predisposition by humans to learn to fear

snakes (Wilson, 1993). A pervasive belief in the

southeastern United States is that the cotton-

mouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus), a common ven-

omous snake around many aquatic areas, is dan-

gerous not only because of its venom and vio-

lent temper (Ernst and Barbour, 1989) but be-

cause it will bite whenever possible and even

attack or chase people (Blythe, 1979).

In contrast to the attitudes of anxiety and fear

toward venomous snakes by most people, some

herpetologists have maintained, beginning al-

most a century ago (Ditmars, 1907), that the

image of some or all venomous snakes as ag-

gressors toward humans is greatly overstated,

with escape or efforts to go undetected being

the most likely behavioral responses (Shine,

1991; Greene, 1997). New Guinea natives have

been suggested to show a learned response in

distinguishing between dangerous and harmless

snakes but not to possess ‘‘an irrational innate

fear’’ (Diamond, 1993). Despite the contention

by some herpetologists that cottonmouths are

not aggressive when encountered in the field

(Wright and Wright, 1957; Gloyd and Conant,

1990) and that the primary purpose of venom

is to subdue prey (Campbell and Lamar, 1989),

misgivings about the species persist among the

general public and many scientists.

Humans have been used to represent gener-

alized threat stimuli by simulating a predator to

elicit defensive behaviors in snakes (Scudder

and Chiszar, 1977; Goode and Duvall, 1989;

Greene, 1989), and tests of the effects of tem-

perature and other factors on defensive re-

sponses by snakes have been conducted (Scud-

der and Chiszar, 1977; Goode and Duvall,

1989). Nonetheless, quantitative measurements

for purposes of determining the response of

venomous snakes to humans are limited (Whi-

taker and Shine, 1999), and the suite of behav-

ioral responses of cottonmouths to direct phys-

ical contact with humans has not been reported.

The objective of our study was to test the de-

fensive responses of free-ranging cottonmouths

confronted by a human aggressor. We use this

test to determine whether conventional wisdom

about aggressive behavior in this species is war-

ranted. Information about the validity of real

versus perceived threats by venomous snakes is

necessary to address irrational negative atti-

tudes and to help quell the recently document-

ed global decline in reptiles (Gibbons et al.,

2000).

M

ATERIALS AND



M

ETHODS


Cottonmouths are ideal subjects for a study

of behavioral responses to encounters by hu-

mans because (1) they can be found in high

densities in many areas of the southeastern

United States (Ernst and Barbour 1989), (2)

preconceived notions exist that suggest that cot-

tonmouths are among the most aggressive of

North American venomous snakes (Blythe,

1979; Ernst, 1992; Rubio, 1998), and (3) they

exhibit a suite of measurable defensive behav-

iors suitable for tests in the field.

We searched the Savannah River floodplain

swamp on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Sa-

vannah River Site (Gibbons et al., 1997) in

South Carolina for cottonmouths during spring


196

COPEIA, 2002, NO. 1

Fig. 1.

Defensive responses of wild cottonmouths



(Agkistrodon piscivorus). Bars indicate the proportion

of individuals that responded in a particular manner

for each of the three different treatments: stand be-

side (n

ϭ 13), step on (ϭ 22), and pick up (ϭ

36).


and early summer of 1997 and 1998 and the

summer of 2000. We examined defensive be-

havior of wild cottonmouths in response to a

human aggressor by subjecting them to one or

more of three different treatments. When we

encountered a cottonmouth in the field, we ap-

proached the snake and either (1) stood beside

it with a ‘‘snakeproof’’ boot touching its body,

(2) stepped on the snake at midbody with

enough force to restrain but not injure it, or (3)

picked up the snake at midbody with a pair of

1-m snake tongs (Whitney Tongs) with a grasp-

ing handle that was modified to resemble a hu-

man arm and hand. A leather glove was fitted

over the end of the tongs, with one extension

covered by the thumb and the other by the mid-

dle finger. Hence, the glove could be closed

around the snake’s body. A padded shirt sleeve

was used to cover the remainder of the rod up

to the handle. Each treatment was carried out

for 20 sec, and the behavior of each snake was

recorded.

For each treatment on each snake tested, we

recorded whether it attempted to escape by

crawling or swimming away, exhibited other de-

fensive behaviors (vibrated tail, released musk,

gaped, feigned a bite by striking but not closing

the mouth), or bit the boot or model hand. An

audio tape recorder was used to describe events

during each encounter, and the majority of en-

counters were videotaped. After testing, the sex,

size (snout–vent length to nearest centimeter),

and body temperature (to nearest C using a clo-

acal thermometer) were determined for most

snakes.

R

ESULTS



We recorded responses to a total of 80 en-

counters of 45 snakes (12 females, 16 males, 17

of undetermined sex) in the field. Of these,

nine escaped (immediately entered water)

when first observed or approached and were

not available for further testing. Of the remain-

ing 36 snakes, we initially stood beside 13,

stepped on 12, and picked up 11. Of those that

we stood beside, 10 were then stepped on, and

of those stepped on initially or secondarily, 15

were picked up, resulting in total sample sizes

of 13 (stood beside), 22 (stepped on), and 36

(picked up).

Body size ranged from 20–101 cm (mean

ϭ

59 cm, n



ϭ 40). Cloacal body temperatures

ranged from 17–27 C (mean

ϭ 24 C, ϭ 25).

No relationships were observed among the be-

havioral responses of individuals and their sex,

size, or body temperature; hence these variables

were omitted from further analyses.

Of the 13 individual cottonmouths that we

initially stood beside (Fig. 1), four attempted to

escape, five gave some form of defensive display,

and none tried to bite, although one individual

feigned a bite during a strike. Only two of the

individuals performed more than one defensive

display.


Of the 22 that were stepped on either initially

or secondarily, 15 gave defensive displays, in-

cluding two that feigned bites. One bit the boot.

Nine of those stepped on were attempting to

escape by crawling away. Of the 36 individuals

that were picked up, 13 (36%) bit the artificial

hand near the point of contact with the snake’s

body. The probability of a cottonmouth biting,

regardless of the testing procedure, was less

than the probability of it not biting (chi-square

ϭ 15.05, df ϭ 2, Ͻ 0.005).

D

ISCUSSION



Our observations strongly support the con-

tention of Pope (1958) that ‘‘snakes are first

cowards, then bluffers, and last of all warriors.’’

Upon being seen, nine (20%) of the individuals

fled into nearby water, apparently sensing that

immediate escape was possible and a safe route

was accessible. Such flight behavior by cotton-

mouths was noted by Ditmars (1907), who stat-

ed that ‘‘snakes that observed us when some lit-


197

GIBBONS AND DORCAS—COTTONMOUTH DEFENSE TOWARD HUMANS

tle distance away, made for the water and es-

caped. . . .’’ Ernst (1992) likewise reported that

cottonmouths try to escape when first dis-

turbed.


Mouth gaping, the bluffing behavior from

which the name ‘‘cottonmouth’’ originates, was

observed by us in 64% of the individuals that

did not flee. In addition, 33% vibrated the tail,

and 24% emitted a detectable musk. The open-

mouthed behavior is presumed to be a true

threat display to warn a predator that a bite is

imminent. Tail vibration has been regarded as

a warning signal in rattlesnakes (CrotalusSistru-

rus; Greene, 1988) and presumably serves the

same function in cottonmouths that it does in

many other snakes. The musky odor is pre-

sumed to be a means by which an individual

presents itself as a distasteful meal prior to at-

tack by a predator.

No relationship between body temperature of

the snake and a tendency to bite was apparent

in our study. Likewise, in a study of prairie rat-

tlesnakes (Crotalus viridis viridis), males and

non-gravid females showed no temperature-re-

lated change in defensive behavior, although a

negative relationship was observed between

temperature and defensive response in gravid

females (Goode and Duvall, 1989).

Most venomous snakebites in the United

States occur when someone picks up a snake or

attempts to kill it (Ernst and Zug, 1996). Our

results with cottonmouths quantify and support

this assertion. Such ‘‘illegitimate’’ snakebites

(‘‘those sustained by individuals who knowingly

place themselves at risk’’; Minton, 1987) may be

induced only after considerable harassment to

the snake. Of the 11 snakes in our study picked

up without previously being stepped on, only

one bit the glove, suggesting that the preceding

harassment (stepped beside or on) provoked

the highest incidence of biting.

The cost to a snake of biting and injecting

venom into a human antagonist has not been

quantified, but certain unfavorable consequenc-

es are obvious. Engaging in a fight with a larger

animal constitutes unnecessary exposure that

could lead to injury or death for the snake.

Even if an effective bite were delivered, the time

to incapacitate an animal as large as a human

would still permit time to injure or kill the

snake. Therefore, once a snake perceives it has

been detected and has no ready escape route,

threats or other defensive displays designed to

ward off an attacker should be favored by nat-

ural selection over actual biting.

In the current study, little or no evidence of

venom was present on the glove following most

of the bites. Some venomous snakes can control

the amount of venom injected based on prey

size (Hayes, 1995), suggesting that snakes can

conserve venom when biting. Such control can

presumably be exercised during defensive bit-

ing, with the act of biting serving as a threat

display itself, without the injection of venom.

Such behavior may explain the high frequency

of ‘‘dry bites’’ in which little or no venom is

injected into human victims (Parrish et al.,

1966). However, we maintain that escape by

snakes from human confrontation by some

means other than biting is the most prudent.

A

CKNOWLEDGMENTS



We thank individuals from the Savannah Riv-

er Ecology Laboratory, especially T. Mills, for

field assistance and thank R. Semlitsch, J. Pech-

mann, K. Buhlmann, and D. Scott for helpful

comments on the manuscript. Testing was con-

ducted under South Carolina Department of

Natural Resources scientific collecting permits

issued to JWG and under auspices of the Uni-

versity of Georgia Animal Care Protocol pro-

gram. Research and manuscript preparation

were supported with Financial Assistance Award

DE-FC09–96SR18546 from the U.S. Department

of Energy to the University of Georgia Research

Foundation.

L

ITERATURE



C

ITED


B

LYTHE


, C. 1979. Poisonous snakes of America: what

you need to know about them. Branch-Smith, Inc.,

Fort Worth, TX.

C

AMPBELL



, J. A.,

AND


W. W. L

AMAR


. 1989. The ven-

omous reptiles of Latin America. Comstock Pub-

lishing Associates, Ithaca, NY.

D

IAMOND



, J. 1993. New Guineans and their natural

world, p. 251–271. In: The biophilia hypothesis. S.

R. Kellert and E. O. Wilson, (eds.). Island Press,

Washington, DC.

D

ITMARS


, R. L. 1907. The reptile book. Doubleday,

Page, and Co., New York.

E

RNST


, C. H. 1992. Venomous reptiles of North Amer-

ica. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

———,

AND


R. W. B

ARBOUR


. 1989. Snakes of eastern

North America. George Mason Univ. Press, Fairfax,

VA.

———,


AND

G. R. Z


UG

. 1996. Snakes in question.

Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

G

IBBONS



, J. W., V. J. B

URKE


, J. E. L

OVICH


, R. D. S

EM

-



LITSCH

, T. D. T

UBERVILLE

, J. R. B

ODIE

, J. L. G



REENE

,

P. H. N



IEWIAROWSKI

, H. H. W

HITEMAN

, D. E. S



COTT

,

J. H. K. P



ECHMANN

, C. R. H

ARRISON

, S. H. B



ENNETT

,

J. D. K



RENZ

, M. S. M

ILLS

, K. A. B



UHLMANN

, J. R. L

EE

,

R. A. S



EIGEL

, A. D. T

UCKER

, T. M. M



ILLS

, T. L


AMB

,

M. E. D



ORCAS

, J. D. C

ONGDON

, M. H. S



MITH

, D. H.


N

ELSON


, M. B. D

IETSCH


, H. G. H

ANLIN


, J. A. O

TT

,



AND

D. J. K


ARAPATAKIS

. 1997. Perceptions of species

abundance, distribution, and diversity: lessons from


198

COPEIA, 2002, NO. 1

four decades of sampling on a government-man-

aged reserve. Environ. Manage. 21:259–268.

———, D. E. S

COTT


, T. R

YAN


, K. B

UHLMANN


, T. T

UB

-



ERVILLE

, J. G


REENE

, T. M


ILLS

, Y. L


EIDEN

, S. P


OPPY

, C.


W

INNE


,

AND


B. M

ETTS


. 2000. The global decline of

reptiles, de´ja` vu amphibians. BioScience 50:653–

666.

G

LOYD



, H. K.,

AND


R. C

ONANT


. 1990. Snakes of the

Agkistrodon complex. Society for the Study of Am-

phibians and Reptiles, St. Louis, MO.

G

OODE


, M. J.,

AND


D. D

UVALL


. 1989. Body tempera-

ture and defensive behavior of free-ranging prairie

rattlesnakes, Crotalus viridis viridis. Anim. Behav. 38:

360–62.


G

REENE


, H. W. 1988. Antipredator mechanisms in rep-

tiles, p. 1–152. In: Biology of the Reptilia. Vol. 16.

C. Gans and R. B. Huey (eds.). Alan R. Liss, Inc.,

New York.

———. 1989. Defensive behavior and feeding biology

of the Asian mock viper, Psammodynastes pulverulen-



tus (Colubridae), a specialized predator on scincid

lizards. Chinese Herpetol. Res. 2:21–32.

———. 1997. Snakes: the evolution of mystery in na-

ture. Univ. of California Press, Berkeley.

H

AYES


, W. K. 1995. Venom metering by juvenile prai-

rie rattlesnakes, Crotalus v. viridis: effects of prey size

and experience. Anim. Behav. 50:33–40.

K

LAUBER



, L. M. 1972. Rattlesnakes: their habits, life

histories, and influence on mankind. Univ. of Cal-

ifornia Press, Los Angeles.

M

INTON



, S. A. 1987. Poisonous snakes and snakebite

in the U.S.: a brief review. Northwest Sci. 61:136–

137.

P

ARRISH



, H. M., J. C. G

OLDNER


,

AND


S. L. S

ILBERG


.

1966. Poisonous snakebites causing no venenation.

Postgrad. Med. 39:265–269.

P

OPE



, C. H. 1958. Snakes alive and how they live. Vi-

king Press, New York.

R

UBIO


, M. 1998. Rattlesnake: portrait of a predator.

Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

S

CUDDER


, K. M.,

AND


D. C

HISZAR


. 1977. Effects of six

visual stimulus conditions on defensive and explor-

atory behavior in two species of rattlesnakes.

Psychol. Rec. 3:519–526.

S

HINE


, R. 1991. Australian snakes: a natural history.

Reed Books, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

W

HITAKER


, P. B.,

AND


R. S

HINE


. 1999. Responses of

free-ranging brown snakes (Pseudonaja textilis, Elap-

idae) to encounters with humans. Wildl. Res. 26:

689–704.


W

ILSON


, E. O. 1993. Biophilia and the conservation

ethic, p. 33–34. In: The biophilia hypothesis. S. R.

Kellert and E. O. Wilson (eds.). Island Press, Wash-

ington, DC.

W

RIGHT


, A. H.,

AND


A. A. W

RIGHT


. 1957. Handbook

of snakes of the United States and Canada. Vol. II.

Comstock Publ. Assoc., Ithaca, NY.

U

NIVERSITY OF



G

EORGIA


, S

AVANNAH


R

IVER


E

COL


-

OGY


L

ABORATORY

, D

RAWER


E, A

IKEN


, S

OUTH


C

AROLINA


29802. P

RESENT ADDRESS

: (MED)

D

EPARTMENT OF



B

IOLOGY


, P.O. B

OX

1719, D



A

-

VIDSON



C

OLLEGE


, D

AVIDSON


, N

ORTH


C

AROLINA


28036. E-mail: ( JWG) gibbons@srel.edu.

Send reprint requests to JWG. Submitted: 9

Jan. 2001. Accepted: 10 June 2001. Section

editor: C. Guyer.




Yüklə 107,72 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə