429 Younus et al. World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences



Yüklə 392,53 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.07.2017
ölçüsü392,53 Kb.

www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

429 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

 

 

 

SCREENING IN-VITRO ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF RAPHANUS 

SATIVUS L. VAR. CAUDATUS

 

Afshan Siddiq

 

and Ishrat Younus

*

 

 

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Karachi. 

*Faculty of Pharmacy, Hamdard University, Karachi. 

 

ABSTRACT 

The aim of present investigation was to evaluate antifungal  activity of 

ethanolic extract of Raphanus sativus L. var. caudatus. The antifungal 

activity  using  agar  disk  diffusion  method  was  determined  against  six 

fungal  strains;  Aspergillus  niger,  Trichphyton  rubrum,    Microsporum 



canis,  Fusarium lini,  Candida glabrata  and Candida albicans.  Four 

different  concentrations  (50,  100,  200  and  400μg/ml)  of Raphanus 



caudatus  extract  and  standard  drug  (Miconazole)  were  tested  against 

fungi  and  zone  of  growth  inhibition  were  measured.  Raphanus 



caudatus exhibited remarkable antifungal activity (p < 0.05) against all  

fungi  at  all  tested  concentrations  except  Fusarium  lini  which  was  inhibited  only  at  higher 

concentrations (400 and 800μg/ml). It is noted that with increase  in concentration, the zones 

of  growth  inhibition  were  also  increased.  Thus  Raphanus  caudatus  could  be  a  lead  for 

development of antifungal agents in future. 

 

KEYWORDS:  Raphanus caudatus, ethanolic extract, antifungal activity, Miconazole. 

 

INTRODUCTION 

Medicinal  plants  are  used  for  various  diseases  around  the  globe.  In  fact,  almost  all  the 

cultures  of  world  depend  upon  herbs  for  primary  health  care  because  they  are  economical, 

easily  available  with  fewer  side  effects  (Mukhergi  et  al.  2007).  It  was  evaluated  that  about 

25% of  various  type  of  herbal  constituents  have  been  extracted  from  plants  (Mukhtar  et  al. 

2008).  


 

Raphanus  sativus  L.  Var.  caudatus  belongs  to  the  family  Brassicaceae,  is  a plant of 

the radish genus  Raphanus.  These  are  basically  Radish  pods  purple  or  green  in  color,  are 

              

WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 

                                                                                                                                                                           SJIF Impact Factor 5.210 

                   Volume 4, Issue 11, 429-437               Research Article                 ISSN 2278 – 4357 

 

 

 

Article Received on 

16 Sep 2015, 

 

Revised on 5 Oct 2015, 



Accepted on 26 Oct 2015 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

*Correspondence for  

Author  

Ishrat Younus  

Faculty of Pharmacy, 

Hamdard University, 

Karachi. 



www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

430 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

consumed for properties attributed to Raphanus. These are known as Mungraa or Sungraa in 

Pakistan & India (Khare, 2007).   

 

Radish  pods  are  rich  in  ascorbic  acid,  folic  acid  and  potassium.  They  are  a  good  source of 



vitamin  B6,  riboflavin,  magnesium,  copper  and  calcium.  Raphanus  caudatus  (RC)  was 

suggested to be the  functional  food since  it was reported to have several kinds of  minerals, 

vitamins and some active pharmaceutical metabolites such as sulforaphene and sulforaphane 

(Songsak and Lockwood, 2002, Pokasap, et al. 2013). Both isothiocyanate compounds have 

proven  role  against  prostate,  breast,  colon  and  ovarian  cancers  by  virtue  of  its  cancer-cell 

growth  inhibition  and  cytotoxic  effects  on  cancer  cells  (Holst  and  Williamson,  2004).    RC 

contained  phenolic  compounds  which  showed  antioxidant  activity  (Charoonratana,  et  al. 

2014).  Radish  is  found  to  be  antimicrobial  (Abdou,  et  al.  1972),  anti-fungal  (Terres  et  al. 

1992),  antiurolithiatic  (Vargas,  et  al.  1999),  anti-inflammatory  (Moon  and  Kim,  2012)  and 

antioxidant (Takaya, et al. 2003). The leaf, seed and root of Raphanus sativus are claimed to 

have  various  medicinal  uses  (Gutiérrezand  and  Perez,  2004).  Fatty  acids  are  the  major 

nutritional  composition  of  interests  in  seed.  Other  nutritional  components  include  minerals, 

vitamin, proteins and polysaccharides (Sham, et al. 2013).  

 

Among  plants,  Brassicaceae  have  been  reported  having  significant  antifungal 



activity. Moreover  it  has  known  for  long  time  that  radish  possesses  strong  antifungal 

properties,  its  seeds  are  also  reported  for  antifungal  activities  with  different  antifungal 

components  (Duke  and  Ayensu,  1985,  Bown  1995).  In  contrast  RC, one  of  the  varieties  of 

radish, has not been reported against fungal infections so far. The present study is designed to 

explore antifungal potential of RC. 

 

MATERIAL AND METHODS 



Collection of plant materials 

Fresh  and  healthy  pods  of  Raphanus  sativus  L.  were  collected  from  District  Karachi 

(Pakistan)  and  were  identified  from  herbarium,  University  of  Karachi,  Pakistan.  The  plant 

pods were washed thoroughly with double distilled water to avoid contamination.  

 

The  plant  pods  were  dried  in  air  under  shade  at  room  temperature  and  stored  in  properly 



labeled tightly well closed containers.  

 

 



 

www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

431 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Extraction of plants material 

The  dried  pods  were  grinded  with  the  help  of  mechanical  grinder.  Extraction  of  plant  pods 

were  carried  out  with  ethanol  using  soxhlet  apparatus  (Davey  et  al.  2010).  100  grams  of 

powdered pods of plant were placed in thimble of soxhlet apparatus and extracted by 500 ml 

of  ethanol.  All  extracts  were  filtered  using  autoclaved  Whatmann’s  filter  paper  and 

centrifuged at 2400 × g for 15 minutes (Wittschier et al. 2009)All the extracts were dried in 

rotary evaporator at 45° C until semi- solid extract obtained. Percentage yield of extract was 

calculated.  The extract was  stored at 4

o

C  in  the refrigerator  until  further  use. Four different 



concentrations of crude extract were subjected to antifungal studies. 

 

IN-VITRO ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY 

Following six different fungi were selected for antifungal evaluation: 

Aspergillus  niger  (ATCC  1015),  Trichphyton  rubrum  (ATCC  MYA  4438),  Microsporum 

canis  (ATCC  10214),  Fusarium  lini  (NRRL  2204),  Candida  glabrata  (ATCC  90030)  and 

Candida albicans (ATCC 36082). The  yeasts and molds were grown in Sabouraud dextrose 

agar and PDA media, respectively, at 28°C. The stock cultures were maintained at 4°C. 

 

In vitro antifungal activity of ethanolic extract of  Raphanus caudatus against six pathogenic 

fungi were evaluated by the agar disk diffusion test (Bauer et al 1966; Rios et al 1988). The 

extract  was  dissolved  in  DMSO  (dimethyl  sulfoxide),  sterilized  by  filtration  using  sintered 

glass filter and stored at 4°C. For the determination of zone of inhibition, fungal strains were 

taken as a standard antibiotic for comparison of the results. Four concentrations (50, 100, 200 

and 400μg/ml) of Raphanus caudatus extract and standard drug (Miconazole) were prepared 

in double-distilled water using nutrient agar tubes. The zones of inhibition of fungal growth 

were determined by measuring sizes of inhibitory zones (including the diameter of disk) after 

7  days  at  28°C.  All  experiments  were  carried  out  in  triplicate, the  solvent  ethanol  was  also 

evaluated  alone  for  its  inhibitory  effect  and  it  has  shown  no  inhibitory  effect  at  tested 

concentrations.  

 

RESULTS 

In the present study, four different concentrations of RC ethanolic extract against six fungal 

strains were evaluated. The results were measured as zone of growth inhibition. The extract 

has shown significant antifungal activity  against all  fungi at all tested concentrations except 



Fusarium lini which was  inhibited only at higher concentrations (400 and 800μg/ml) of RC 

extract.  It  is  noted  that  with  increase  in  concentration,  the  zones  of  growth  inhibition  were 



www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

432 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

also  increased.  Antifungal  effects  of  standard  drug  Miconazole  and  RC  extract  against 

different fungal strains are presented in table 1 and 2 respectively. The zones of inhibition for 

different fungal strains were found in the range of 17 -28 mm and 14 – 20mm for Miconazole 

and RC ethanolic extract respectively (Figure 1-2). 

 

Table  1:  Antifungal  activity  of  Miconazole  (Standard  drug)  against  different  fungal 

strains. 

Standard drug 

Miconazole 

Zone of inhibitions (mm) 

100 

200 

400 

800 

Aspergillus niger 

17 


19 

22 


26 

Trichphyton rubrum 

19 


20 

23 


25 

Microsporum canis 

17 


18 

19 


22 

Fusarium lini 

18 


19 

20 


25 

Candida glabrata 

18 


20 

23 


26 

Candida albicans 

17 


21 

25 


28 

 

Values are Mean + SD of three experiments. 



 

    Table 2: Antifungal activity of RC ethanolic extract against different fungal strains. 

S.No  Name of Fungus 

Concentrations of RC ethanolic extract (μg/ml) 

100 

200 

400 

800 

Zone of inhibitions (mm) 



Aspergillus niger 

14 


15 

17 


20 



Trichphyton rubrum 

14 


15 

16 


18 



Microsporum canis 

13 


13 

14 


15 



Fusarium lini 



14 

16 




Candida glabrata 

15 


16 

17 


19 



Candida albicans 

16 


18 

20 


23 

    

Values are Mean + SD of three experiments; - indicates no zone of inhibition. 



 

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 

Statistical differences of results  for antifungal  assay were carried out  by  ANOVA (Analysis 

of variance) test. Results with p value < 0.05 were taken as significant. All data manipulation 

and  statistical  analysis  were  carried  out  by  using  Statistical  Package  for  Social  Sciences 

(SPSS for Windows version 20, SPSS inc., Chicago, IL, USA). 

 

DISCUSSION 

Fungal  infections  are  very  common  in  individuals  with  compromised immune  systems  and 

especially in the diabetic patients.

 

Additionally very old and very young individuals are also 



at risk.

 


www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

433 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Plants have enriched profile of antimicrobial  constituents  for example  flavonoids, alkaloids, 

polysaccharides, coumarins, glycosides, lignans, saponins, polyines, thiophenes, proteins and 

polyphenolics (Jassim  and Naji, 2003).   It  has  been estimated that  approximately 250000 to 

500000  species  of  plants  exist  but  few  of  them  have  been  evaluated  for  their  antifungal 

potential.  The plants  could  be a  lead  for the development of antifungal compounds as they 

have  already  been  inhibiting  phytopathogenic  fungi  to  which  they  are  exposed  in  their 

environment (De Lucca et al 2005).  

 

Due to its high yield and excellent nutritional value Radish has been grown all over the world 



(Sham et al 2013). Radish and  its different varieties  have  been reported for their antifungal 

potential.  Earlier,  the  ethanolic  extract  of  root  juice  of  radish  exhibited  antifungal  activity 

against  Candida  albicans  (Caceres,  1987).  In  another  study,  Takasugi  et  al  1987  isolated 

spirobrassinin, one of the phytoalexin from Raphanus sativus L. var. hortensin which showed 

substantial  antifungal  potential.  Two  peptides  rich  in  cystein  designated  as  RsAFP1  and 

RsAFP2 were isolated from radish showed notable antifungal activity against different fungi 

(Terras  et  al 1992). Moreover antifungal  activity  of these peptides  have  been  suggested  via 

receptor mediated mechanism (Thevissen et al 1996).  

  

 

Figure1: Antifungal activity of Miconazole against different fungal strains. 



 

www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

434 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

 

Figure2: Antifungal activity of RC ethanolic extract against different fungal strains. 

 

Shin  and  Hwang,  2001  isolated  two  antifungal  substances  named  as  RAP1  (Raphanus 



Antifungal Peptide-1) and RAP2 (Raphanus Antifungal Peptide-2) from Korean radish seeds.  

Their  structure and  molecular  masses were determined using different chromatographic  and 

non-chromatographic techniques. Both substances were effective fungicidal agents especially 

against Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The antifungal activity of RC in the 

present investigation could be related to the presence of peptides. 

 

Lee et al 2013 showed that ethyl  acetate extract of  Korean radish  leaves contain significant 



amount of polyphenols and  flavonoids which are responsible  for considerable antimicrobial 

activities against different gram positive bacteria’s. 

 

It  has  been  reported  that  isothiocyanate  compounds  in  Raphanus  and  other  members  of 



Brassicass  are  responsible  for  antifungal  activities  (Smolinska  and  Horbowicz  1999).  The 

presence of sulphoraphane, sulphoraphene and different other isothiocyanates have been  also 

reported in the pods of Raphanus (Songsak and Lockwood 2002). In addition Ferulic acid and 

caffeic  acid  in  Raphanus  also  exhibited  antifungal  activities.  Thus  the  occurence  of  these 

compounds in RC could be linked to its antifungal activity in the present study. 

 

Radish and its seeds are reported to have 2S albumin showed antifungal activity by enhancing 



the permeability of plasma membranes of fungi (Terras et al 1995). 

 

 



www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

435 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

CONCLUSION 

In the present investigation, 



Raphanus sativus L. var. caudatus

 has shown remarkable invitro 

antifungal  potential.  In  vitro  study  gives  role  model  for  screening  of  drugs  and  so  helps  in 

further  evaluations  of  activities  of  drugs.  Further  research  including  in  vivo  studies  is 

required to elucidate the antifungal phytochemicals of the plant with their target of action.  

 

REFERENCES 

1.

 



C.P. Khare, Indian Medicinal Plants An Illustrated Dictionary, 2007. 

2.

 



T. Songsak and G.  Lockwood. Glucosinolates of  seven  medicinal plants  from Thailand. 

Fitoterapia, 2002; 73: 209-216.  

3.

 

P.  Pocasap,  N.  Weerapreeyakul,  and  S.  Barusrux.  Cancer  preventive  effect  of  Thai  rat-



tailed radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. caudatus Alef). Journal of Functional Foods, 2013; 

5: 1372-1381.  

4.

 

B. Holstand and G. Williamson. A critical review of the bioavailability of glucosinolates 



and related compounds. Natural product reports, 2004; 21: 425-447.  

5.

 



T.  Charoonratana,  S.  Settharaksa,  F.  Madaka,  and  T. Songsak.  Screening  of  antioxidant 

and total phenolic contents in raphanus sativus pod International Journal of Pharmacy and 

Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2014; 6.  

6.

 



A. Abdou,  Abou-Zeid, M. El-Sherbeeny, and Z. Abou-El-Gheat. Antimicrobial activities 

of  Allium  sativum,  Allium  cepa,  Raphanus  sativus,  Capsicum  frutescens,  Eruca  sativa, 

Allium kurrat on bacteria. Qualitas Plantarum et Materiae Vegetabiles, 1972; 22: 29-35.  

7.

 



F.R.  Terras,  I.J.  Goderis,  F.  Van  Leuven,  J.  Vanderleyden,  B.P.  Cammue  and  W.F. 

Broekaert.  In  vitro  antifungal  activity  of  a  radish  (Raphanus  sativus  L.)  seed  protein 

homologous  to  nonspecific  lipid  transfer  proteins.  Plant  physiology,  1992;  100:          

1055-1058.  

8.

 

S. R. Vargas, G. S. Perez, G. Perez, S.M. Zavala, and G.C. Perez. Antiurolithiatic activity 



of  Raphanus  sativus  aqueous  extract  on  rats.  Journal  of  ethnopharmacology,  1999;  68: 

335-338.  

9.

 

P.  D.  Moon  and  H.  M.  Kim.  Anti-inflammatory  effect  of  phenethyl  isothiocyanate,  an 



active ingredient of Raphanus sativus Linn. Food Chemistry, 2012; 131: 1332-1339.  

10.


 

Y.  Takaya,  Y.  Kondo,  T.  Furukawa,  and  M.  Niwa.  Antioxidant  constituents  of  radish 

sprout (Kaiware-daikon), Raphanus sativus L. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 

2003; 51: 8061-8066.  



www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

436 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

11.


 

R.M.P. Gutiérrezand R.L. Perez. Raphanus sativus (Radish): their chemistry and biology. 

The Scientific World Journal, 2004; 4: 811-837.  

12.


 

T.T. Sham, A.C.Y. Yuen, Y.F. Ng, C.O. Chan, D.K.W. Mok and S.W. Chan. A review of 

the  phytochemistry  and  pharmacological  activities  of  Raphani  semen.  Evidence-Based 

Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013. 

13.

 

Mukherjee  PK,  Kumar



 

V,  Houghton  PJ.  Phytotherapy  Research.  Screening  of  Indian 

medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, 2007; 21(12): 1142–1145. 

14.


 

Mukhtar  M,  Arshad  M,  Ahmad  M,  Pomerantz  RJ,  Wigdahl  B,  Parveen  Z.  Antiviral  

potentials of medicinal plants. Virus Res, 2008; 131(2): 111-120. 

15.


 

Davey  MR,  Anthony P. 2010. Plant Cell  Culture:  Essential  Methods. 1

st

  ed. Chichwater             



(Sussex): John Willey & sons (UK). 

16.


 

Wittschier  N,  Faller  G,  Hansel  A.  Aqueous  extracts  and  polysachharides  from  liquorice 

roots  (Glycchriza  glabra  L.)  inhibit  adhesion  of  helicobacter  pylori  to  human  gastric 

mucosa. J. Ethnopharmacol, 2009; 125: 218–228. 

17.

 

Jassim SAA, Naji  MA. Novel  antiviral agents:  a medicinal plant perspective. Journal of 



Applied Microbiology, 2003; 95(3): 412–427. 

18.


 

Takasugi,  M.,  Monde,  K.,  Katsui,  N.,  &  Shirata,  A.  Spirobrassinin,  a  novel  sulfur-

containing  phytoalexin  from  the  daikon  Rhaphanus  sativus  L.  var.  hortensis 

(Cruciferae). Chemistry letters, 1987; 8: 1631-1632. 

19.

 

Cáceres,  A.,  Girón,  L.  M.,  Alvarado,  S.  R.,  &  Torres,  M.  F.  Screening  of  antimicrobial 



activity  of  plants  popularly  used  in  Guatemala  for  the  treatment  of  dermatomucosal 

diseases. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 1987; 20(3): 223-237. 

20.

 

Thevissen,  K.,  Ghazi,  A.,  De  Samblanx,  G.  W.,  Brownlee,  C.,  Osborn,  R.  W.,  & 



Broekaert,  W.  F.  Fungal  membrane  responses  induced  by  plant  defensins  and 

thionins. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 1996; 271(25): 15018-15025. 

21.

 

SHIN,  H.  K.,  &  HWANG,  C.  W.  New  antimicrobial  activity  from  Korean  radish  seeds 



(Raphanus sativus L.). Journal of microbiology and biotechnology, 2001; 11(2): 337-341. 

22.


 

De Lucca, A. D., Cleveland, T. E., & Wedge, D. E. Plant-derived antifungal proteins and 

peptides. Canadian journal of microbiology, 2005; 51(12): 1001-1014. 

23.


 

Bown, D. 1995. Encuclopaedia of herbs and their uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. 

24.

 

Duke,  J.  A.,  &  Ayensu,  E.  S.  (1985). Medicinal  plants  of  China (Vol.  2).  Reference 



Publications. 

25.


 

Bauer  AW,  Kirby  WMM,  Sherris  JC,  Turck  M.  Antibiotic  susceptibility  testing  by 

standardized single disc method. Am J Clin Pathol, 1966; 36: 493–6.  


www.wjpps.com  

                            Vol 4, Issue 11, 2015.                           

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

437 



Younus et al.                                 World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 

26.


 

Rios JL Recio MC, Villar  A. Screening  methods for natural products with antimicrobial 



activity: A review of the literature. J Ethnopharmacol, 1988; 23: 127–49. 

 


Yüklə 392,53 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə