A community Search for Malleefowl at Remlap Station



Yüklə 5,91 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü5,91 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

   

33 

 

 

 

 

 

A Community Search for Malleefowl at  

Remlap Station 

 

26

th

 June – 2

nd

 July, 2011 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Proudly funded by the state Natural Resource Management Program 2009-2010 

 

 

 

 

 



For the Shire of Mt Marshall by 

Susanne Dennings, Project Coordinator  

July, 2011 

 

 



 

 


 



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

‘Waiting in line’ stick-in-the-sand sketch by Stephanie Nield,  



Menangina Station, Menzies 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 



 



Executive Summary and Future Recommendations



 

Summary: 

Malleefowl, Leipoa ocellata are gazetted as a species that is rare or threatened with extinction 

in Western Australia and regarded as vulnerable nationally (Benshemesh 2000).  The species 

was  once  common  throughout  the  arid/semi-arid  zones  where  clearing,  overgrazing, 

inappropriate  fire/clearing  regimes  and  the  introduction  of  feral  animals  have  caused 

substantial habitat degradation and additional predation on adults and chicks. 

 

Under  the  guidance  of  the  National  Malleefowl  Recovery  Team,  community  groups, 



government  agencies  and  volunteers  have  established  a  series  of  monitoring  sites  across 

Australia  to  provide  long-term  measurements  of  population  changes  over  time.    The  annual 

survey  results  are  coordinated  and  assessed  by  a  central  collection  point  with  the  aim  of 

providing localised population analysis and future management recommendations. 

 

The  aim  of  this  survey  was  to  identify  malleefowl  breeding  mounds  for  long-term  monitoring 



within the Remlap Station survey site.  The results have provided benchmark estimates for the 

typical  SW  rangelands  habitat.    The  broad  landscape  of  the  Western  Australian  pastoral 

zones requires a broad scale approach as a means to identify malleefowl populations across 

a  representative  area.        Volunteers  walked  approximately  710  km  (total  of  individual 

contributions)  to  survey  936.21  ha  over  4  ½  days.    Of  the  95  mounds  located,  7  showed 

recent activity and are likely to be active this season; and 27 were considered not worthy of 

future monitoring.  Sixteen malleefowl tracks were recorded within the survey site. 

 

Future Recommendations:  

A sustainable future for malleefowl at Remlap Station will depend on the management of three 

key impacts: 

 

1.  Feral Animals:  Considerable evidence of feral goats, minimal wild dog tracks and 

evidence  (tracks,  scats  and  warrens)  of  rabbits  were  noted.    The  on-going 

commitment  by  Remlap  owners  to  the  current  dog  and  fox  control  program  is 

highly commended and recommended. 



2.  Grazing  Pressure:    In  1929  Remlap  ran  7,500  sheep  however  those  numbers 

have never been repeated and the station has not been restocked since the bush 

fire  in  2002.  Habitat  decline  from  feral  goats  however  remains  a  concern  as 

numerous  tracks  were  seen  during  the  5  day  survey.    Additional  pressure  and 

damage to protection fences from large numbers of emus has been recorded in the 

past  particularly  during  drought  years  when  emus  migrate  further  south  from 

surrounding crown land. 

3.  Fire:  Prescribed burning is not practiced at Remlap Station. The survey area did 

include  a  portion  of  a  large  scale  burnt  area  caused  by  a  lightening  strike  in 

January, 2002.  Fire is a threat to successful malleefowl breeding particularly in the 

arid  zones  when  the  build  up  of  sufficient  leaf  litter  for  mound  construction  may 

take from 25 to 35 years depending on rainfall and habitat. 

 

Annual  monitoring  of  located  mounds  during  the  breeding  season  (September-March)  will 

ensure that population trends are measured into the future by providing valuable data to the 

landowners, community of Mt Marshall and the National Malleefowl Recovery Program. 

 


 



 



Acknowledgements 

Malleefowl  surveys  would  not  be  possible  without  the  dedication  and  commitment  of 

volunteers.    Thank  you  to  Lisa  Clark,  NRM  Officer  and  the  Mt  Marshall  Shire  for  their 

successful  NRM  funding  submission,  contribution  to  the  welcome  BBQ  and  the  supply  of 

portable toilets.   

 

A  special  thanks  to  Remlap  owners,  Marilyn  and  John  Dunne  who  commented/edited  this 



report, provided the water truck and gave an introduction to Remlap and its past history; Alan 

Thomson  for  his  photographic  contribution;  team  leader  Robert  Clare;  ‘tail  end  Charlie’  Carl 

Danzi  and  Sheryl  Shaylor  and  Libby  Sandiford who  collated  the  bird  and  plant  species  lists.   

Thank  you  also  to  Liz  Manning  and  Brian  Clarke  for  project  support  and  Bev  Clare  who 

managed the team equipment and supported Alan Dennings in maintaining the camp site and 

hot water copper for those welcome end-of-day bush showers. 



The Remlap Team 

 

Back  row  l-r:  Jim  Laffer  (Perth),  David  Lullfitz  (Pinjarra),  Don  Smith  (Toodyay),  Alan  Dennings 

(Ongerup), Gordon Haggett (Dwellingup), Robert Clare (Koorda), Rodger Hall (Perth)  



2

nd

  row  from  back:    Lorraine  Laffer  (Perth),  John  Shaylor  (Albany),  John  Mathwin  (Kojonup), 

Julia Malet (Boyup Brook), Brian Clarke (York), Lisa Clark (Beacon) and Alan Thomson (Perth) 



3

rd

  row  from  back:  Sheryl  Shaylor  (Albany),  June  Meredith  (Perth),  Ann  Lullfitz  (Pinjarra),  Liz 

Manning (York), Kath Mathwin (Kojonup) 



Front:    Ernie  Haggett  (Busselton),  Eva  Smith  (Toodyay),  Carl  Danzi  (Pickering  Brook),  Libby 

Sandiford (Albany) and Susanne Dennings (Ongerup).   



Inserts: Bev Clare (Koorda) and John and Marilyn Dunne (Remlap station owners)   

 

 



 

 


 



 

 



 

Executive  Summary  and  Future  Recommendations  ………………….…………………..…...…5 

 

Acknowledgements  ……………………………………………………………………………..……..7 



 

 

1.0  Introduction  –  the  Malleefowl  ……………….…………………………………….………..…11 



1.1  Distribution  …………………………….........….…………………………………….…..……12 

 

2.0 Remlap Station Survey …………………………………………………………..…………..……14 



2.1  Community Support and Project Development ……...…………….………………………14 

 

3.0 Site Selection …………...…………………..………………………………………………………14 



3.1 Fire, Weather and Grazing History ………….……………….………..……………………15 

 

4.0 Survey Aims ………………………………………………………………………….………….....16 



 

5.0 Volunteer Contributions and Rewards ……………………………………………….…...……..16 

5.1 Infrastructure and Volunteer Support …………..………………………………..…….…....16 

 

6.0 Survey Methodology……………………………………………………….……………….….…..



.

17 


6.1 Volunteer Induction and Training …………………..….………………………...…….….…17 

 

7.0 Data Recording …………………………………………………………………..………..….……18 



7.1 Mound Definitions ………...……………………………………………………………………18 

7.2 Mound Numbering ……….……….…………………………………………………..………

.

18 


7.3 Malleefowl Tracks ……….……………………………………………………………………..18 

 

8.0 Survey Results …………………………………………………………………………......………19 



 

9.0 Operational Comments 

.

………………………………………...……………………….…………20 



9.1 Additional Observations ……..…………………………………………………………..……21 

 

10.0 Conclusion



  

 .………………………………………………………………………………………..22 

 

References  …………………………………………………………...………….…………….………..25 



 

Figures: 

Figure 1 Adult Malleefowl ……………………………………………………………………..………11 

Figure 2 Malleefowl Chick ……………………………………………………………..………………12 

Figure 3 Malleefowl Distribution Map …………………………………………………..…………….12 

Figure 4 Malleefowl Preservation Group Survey Sites ……………………..……...………...…….13 

Figure 5 Remlap Survey Site Map …………..…………………………………………….………….14 

Figure 6 Aerial Photo of Fire Scar……....……………………………………………..……………..15 

Figure 7 Beacon Fire Fighters

       

………………………….……………..………………………………15 



Figure 8 ‘Human Chain’ survey methodology  ………....……………………………………………17 

Figure 9 Survey Area Showing GPS Boundaries …………………………………………….……19 

Figure 10 Active Mound 

.

………………………………………………………………………………..20



 

Figure 11 Remlap Land Types 

.

………………………………………….……………………………21 



Appendices: 

Appendix 1 Remlap 2011 Volunteers ………..……………………………………………………….29 

Appendix 2 Mound Locations and Descriptions …………………………………………...………..30 

Appendix 3 Possible GPS Waypoint Errors………………………..………………………...…...…33 

Appendix  4  Malleefowl  Track  Locations  and  Other  Observations  ……………………...…...….34 

Appendix 5 Bird Species List 

…………………………………….………………………...……....…35 



Appendix 6 Plant Species Identified in the Survey Area 

.

………...…………………………………37 



Appendix 7 Survey Equipment Supplied …………………………………………………..……...…39 

 

         Index 



 

10 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

11 


 1.0  

Introduction – the Malleefowl

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Figure 1 – Adult Malleefowl  Photo supplied by J. van der Waag © 

 

Malleefowl, Leipoa ocellata is gazetted as a species that is rare or threatened with extinction 



in Western Australia and regarded as vulnerable nationally (Benshemesh 2000).  The species 

was  once  common  throughout  the  arid/semi-arid  zones  where  clearing,  overgrazing, 

inappropriate  fire  and  clearing  regimes  and  introduction  of  feral  animals  have  caused 

substantial habitat degradation and additional predation on adults and chicks.   These factors 

have resulted in a decline in Malleefowl abundance and distribution. 

 

Malleefowl densities are generally greatest in areas of higher rainfall and on more fertile soils 



where habitats tend to be thicker and there is an abundance of food plants. Much of the best 

habitat for Malleefowl has already been cleared or has been modified by sheep, cattle, rabbits 

and  goats.  The  species  has  been  shown  to  be  highly  sensitive  to  stock  and  introduced 

herbivore grazing.   The effect of fire on  Malleefowl is also severe.  Breeding in burnt areas 

may  be  reduced  for  at  least  30  years  particularly  in  the  lower  rainfall  rangeland  regions.  

Predation  by  the  introduced  fox  and  subsequent  increased  populations  of  ‘wild  dogs’ 

(domestic dog/dingo cross) are also thought to be limiting the abundance of Malleefowl.   

 

 



 

 

12 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure 2   Four hour old Malleefowl Chick   



  

1.1 Distribution 

Scattered  historical  records from  the  early  1900’s  suggest that  Malleefowl  were found  in  the 

south-west, Northern Territory region as far north as the Tanami Desert and throughout much 

of southern and central Australia (figure 3).  Since then, Malleefowl appear to have declined 

substantially and are probably extinct in the Northern Territory (Benshemesh, 2000).     

 

The  increasingly  uncertain  future for  Malleefowl  clearly  indicates  an  urgent  need to  describe 



the  distribution  of  the  species,  understand  its  habitat  requirements  and  monitor  population 

trends  across  Australia.    Such  studies  are  regarded  as  being  of  utmost  importance  to  the 

conservation of Malleefowl nationally (Benshemesh 2000, Garnett and Crowley 2000).   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                  



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Figure 3. Past and present distribution of Malleefowl (Benshemesh, 2000) 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Distribution 1991-1998 

  Historical range 1800-1981 


 

13 


Conservation  ecology  studies  in  south-eastern  Australia  have  provided  much  information  on 

the habits and requirements of Malleefowl and threats to its conservation.  Nonetheless, there 

has  been  insufficient  information  available  to  accurately  assess  the  conservation  status  of 

Malleefowl across Australia except in broad terms.  This is primarily because little is known of 

the  species’  population  dynamics  or  its  current  distribution  and  population  trends  in  many 

areas.  Despite these uncertainties, there is no doubt that Malleefowl are currently threatened 

by a range of factors primarily due to loss and fragmentation of their habitat where remaining 

isolated populations are small and prospects for their long-term conservation are poor. 

Fourteen  monitoring  sites  have  been  established  by  the  Malleefowl  Preservation  Group  in 

Western  Australia  with  the  aim  of  increasing  distribution  knowledge  of  the  species  through 

linking  and  working  with  community  groups,  government  agencies  and  corporate  sectors 

(figure 4). 

 

 

     



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 4. Malleefowl Preservation Group community/corporate survey sites 



 

Remlap Station

 

 



Mt Gibson – Dalwallinu/Yalgoo Shires 

 

Yeelirrie Station – Sandstone Shire 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Menangina Station – Menzies Shire 

 

Hidden Valley- Mullewa Shire 



 

Granite Peak- Merredin Shire 

Mt Jackson – Yilgarn Shire 

PNC Track – Menzies Shire 

 

 

Rabbit Proof Fence Rd – Kent/ 



Gnowangerup Shires 

Eyre – Dundas Shire 

Tieline Road – Gnowangerup Shire 

Hills – Gnowangerup Shire 

Foster Road – Gnowangerup Shire 

 

 



Corackerup – Jerramungup Shire 

 

Peniup - Jerramungup Shire 



 

Lake Muir – Manjimup Shire 

 

 

 



 

on 

 

14 


2.0 

Remlap Station Survey 

Remlap  Station  pastoral  lease  is  privately  owned.    The  survey  was  completed  for  the  local 

community with support from the Shire of Mt Marshall. 

 

2.1 Community Support and Project Development 

The Malleefowl Preservation Group (MPG) was approached by the Shire of Mt Marshall NRM 

Officer  and  community  members  in  2009.      Successful  funding  from  the  state  government 

NRM  program  enabled  the  delivery  to  the  Beacon  and  Bencubbin  primary  schools  and  a 

series of community awareness evenings. 

 

3.0    Site Selection 

In response to feed back from the community, several areas met with the following key survey 

site selection criteria: 

 

1. 


Historical and anecdotal evidence of malleefowl populations  

 

in the area 



2. 

Fire and grazing history 

3. 

Accessibility 



4. 

North-south or east-west orientation  

5. 

Community ownership and involvement in long-term monitoring 



6. 

Suitable area for volunteer camp 



 

 

 

 

Figure 5:   Survey site (shaded green) and general area  

 

 



 Town of  Beacon          

         (approx  50 km SSE)                   

 

15 


 

3.1    Fire, Weather and Grazing History 

The  northern  area  of  the  selected  site  was  subject  to  a  broad  scale  bush  fire  started  by 

lightening on the 14

th

 January, 2002 in (figures 6 and 7).  The conditions during the fire were 



described  as  ‘extreme’  creating  a  very  hot  burn  and  intense  fire  scar.  The  vegetation  in 

general  appeared  to  be  in  good  condition  and  regeneration  in  the  burnt  area  is  excellent 

despite severe droughts in 2002, 2006, 2007 and 2010.   

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 6: Aerial photo showing fire scar, tracks and camp site 

Photo provided by Google Earth, 2011 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 7:  Beacon Fire fighters at the end of a hard day’s fire fighting at Remlap 

Photo provided by John Dunne 

 

Welcome  rainfall  (22  ml)  was  recorded  at  Remlap  Tuesday  night  during  the  survey.      The 



team,  understanding  the  urgent  need  for  rain  by  local  farmers  at  the  time,  took  full 

responsibility for this down poor following their ‘Remlap rain romp’ dance performed during a 

break on Monday’s survey walk!  

In the year 1929 Remlap was running 7.500 sheep.  Those numbers were vastly reduced over 

the  following  years.    The  current  owners,  Marilyn  and  John  Dunne  have  totally  destocked 

since  the  bush  fire  of  2002  however  have  expressed  concern  for  a  small  population  of  feral 

goats still roaming the station following several unsuccessful attempts to eradicate them.    

 


 

16 


4.0   Survey Aims

 

The MPG’s survey aims were to establish a malleefowl monitoring site that: 



a)  

Addressed national malleefowl monitoring standards  

b)  

Contributed to the Mt Marshall Shire and community conservation aims  



c)  

Added to the National malleefowl population analysis project   

d)  

Identified  all  malleefowl  mounds for re-checking during the  breeding  season 



(September-March)  each  year  to  ascertain  breeding  densities  and  measure 

population changes 



 

5.0   Volunteer Contributions and Rewards 

A total of 25 walkers took part in the survey (appendix 1).  Volunteer skills gained during the 

survey included: 

1. 


Team participation 

2. 


GPS operation/mapping/surveying    

3. 


Team leadership 

4. 


Digital photography 

5. 


‘Other’ bird species identification  

6. 


Data sheet recording 

7. 


Malleefowl and other animal track/scat identification 

 

5.1  Infrastructure and Volunteer Support 

The  Malleefowl  Preservation  Group  understands  the  value  of  providing  quality  ‘creature 

comforts’ for all participants towards creating a happy team, a safe and comfortable working 

environment and ultimately a successful survey.  

The Malleefowl Preservation Group and Project Coordinator, Susanne Dennings provided the 

main  camp  site  survey  infrastructure  (appendix  6).    The  water  truck  was  supplied  by  John 

Dunne, Remlap station owner and the portable toilets by the Shire of Mt Marshall.  

  


 

17 



Yüklə 5,91 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə