A dissertation submitted in fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of doctorate of science in the department of biochemistry and microbiology, faculty of science and



Yüklə 3,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/10
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü3,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 2.1 Platelet structure ....................................................................................... 2-24
 
Figure 2.2: Mechanism of platelet activation .............................................................. 2-25
 
Figure  2.3:  Representative  scanning  electron  microscopic  (ScEM)  showing  activated 
platelets (5HT and ET1) .......................................................................... 2-26
 
Figure 2.4:  Platelet receptors-ligand interactions.  Overview of well-known receptors on 
platelets and mode of activation .............................................................. 2-27
 
Figure 2.5: Processes of platelets aggregation .......................................................... 2-36
 
Figure 2.6: Biology of homeostasis system ................................................................ 2-38
 
Figure 2.7: Mechanism of acetylchilinesterase ........................................................... 2-41
 
Figure 2.8: The Cyclic AMP Pathway ......................................................................... 2-44
 
Figure 2.9: The four major pathways for Arachidonic acid metabolism ...................... 2-46
 
Figure 2.10: The difference between COX-1 and COX-2 ........................................... 2-47
 
Figure 2.11: Oxidative stress ...................................................................................... 2-49
 
Figure 2.12: Diagram that shows how SOD and Catalase carry out their functions ... 2-52
 
Figure 2.13: Structures of Aspirin ............................................................................... 2-54
 
Figure 2.14: Structure of Clopidogrel.......................................................................... 2-55
 
Figure 2.15: Structure of Dipyridamole ....................................................................... 2-56
 
Figure 2.16: Structure of Ticlopidine........................................................................... 2-57
 
Figure 2.17: Structure of Cilostazol ............................................................................ 2-58
 
Figure 2.18: Structure of sarpogrelate ........................................................................ 2-59
 
Figure 2.19: Structure of picotamide .......................................................................... 2-60
 
Figure 2.20: Structure of Beraprost ............................................................................ 2-60
 
Figure 2.21: Structure of Trapidil ................................................................................ 2-61
 
Figure 2.22: Structure of squalene ............................................................................. 2-64
 

 
 
 
1-17 
 
Figure 2.23: Structure of Cholesterol.......................................................................... 2-64
 
Figure 2.24: Structure of Lanostrane .......................................................................... 2-64
 
Figure 2.25: Structure of Cycloartane......................................................................... 2-64
 
Figure 2.26: Structure of Betulinic acid ....................................................................... 2-65
 
Figure 2.26: Melaleuca bracteata var. Revolution Gold .............................................. 2-66
 
Figure 3.1: Schematic diagram for synthesis of BAA ................................................. 3-74
 
Figure 3.2: Schematic diagram for synthesis of BAA/OAA from BA/OA ..................... 3-75
 
Figure 3.3: Animal model chart for inflammation evalution ......................................... 3-81
 
Figure 4.1: Chemical structure of BA .......................................................................... 4-84
 
Figure 4.2: Chemical structure of BAA ....................................................................... 4-85
 
Figure 4.3: Chemical structure of OA ......................................................................... 4-86
 
Figure 4.4: Chemical structure of OAA ....................................................................... 4-86
 
Figure 4.5: Antithrombin activity of the isolated compounds. ..................................... 4-91
 
Figure 4.6a: Platelet aggregation induced by collagen. .............................................. 4-93
 
Figure 4.6b: Platelet aggregation induced by ADP. .................................................... 4-94
 
Figure 4.6c: Platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. ............................................. 4-95
 
Figure 4.6d: Platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine. ........................................ 4-96
 
Figure 4.7: ATP activity of the isolated compounds. .................................................. 4-97
 
Figure 4.8: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity of the compounds. ....................... 4-98
 
Figure 4.9: Percentage phosphodiesterase inhibition activity of the compounds. ...... 4-99
 
Figure 4.10: The compound inhibition of Calcium levels in cytosol. ......................... 4-100
 
Figure 4.11: Bleeding time for the isolated compounds. ........................................... 4-101
 
Figure 4.12: Inflammation evaluation of the isolated compounds. ............................ 4-102
 
Figure 4.13: Percentage COX inhibitory activity of the isolated compounds. ........... 4-103
 

 
 
 
1-18 
 
Figure 4.14: Percentage SOD stimulatory activity of the isolated compounds. ........ 4-104
 
Figure 4.15: Catalase stimulatory activity of the isolated compounds. ..................... 4-105
 
Figure 4.16: Percentage iron chelation of the isolated compounds. ......................... 4-106
 
Figure  4.17:  The  microscopic  pictures  of  platelet  aggregation  treated  with  isolated 
compounds (10mg/ml) at a magnification of x1500. .............................. 4-108
 
Figure B1: Calibration curve of SOD concentration (mg/ml) against absorbance (nm). . 6-
157
 
Figure C1.1a: 
1
H-NMR spectrum of BA .................................................................... 6-158
 
Figure C1.1b: 
1
H-NMR spectrum of BA .................................................................... 6-159
 
Figure C1.2a: 
13
C-NMR spectrum of BA .................................................................. 6-160
 
Figure C1.2b:
13
C-NMR spectrum of BA.................................................................... 6-161
 
Figure C1.3a: IR spectrum of BA ............................................................................. 6-162
 
Figure C1.3b: IR spectrum of BA ............................................................................. 6-163
 
Figure C1.4a: Mass spectroscopy of BA .................................................................. 6-164
 
Figure C1.4b: Mass spectroscopy of BA .................................................................. 6-165
 
Figure C2.1a: 
1
H-NMR spectrum of BAA ................................................................. 6-166
 
Figure C2.1b:  
1
H-NMR spectrum of BAA ................................................................ 6-167
 
Figure C2.2: 
13
C-NMR spectrum of BAA .................................................................. 6-168
 
Figure C2.3a: IR spectrum of BAA ........................................................................... 6-169
 
Figure C2.3b: IR spectrum of BAA ........................................................................... 6-170
 
Figure C2.4a: Mass spectroscopy of BAA ................................................................ 6-171
 
Figure C2.4b: Mass spectroscopy of BAA ................................................................ 6-172
 
Figure C3.1a: 
1
H-NMR spectrum of BA/OA .............................................................. 6-173
 
Figure C3.1b: 
1
H-NMR spectrum of BA/OA .............................................................. 6-174
 
Figure C3.2a: 
13
C-NMR spectrum of BA/OA ............................................................ 6-175
 

 
 
 
1-19 
 
Figure C3.2b: 
13
C-NMR spectrum of BA/OA ............................................................ 6-176
 
Figure C3.3a: IR spectrum of BA/OA ....................................................................... 6-177
 
Figure C3.3b: IR spectrum of BA/OA ....................................................................... 6-178
 
Figure C3.4a: Mass spectroscopy of BA/OA ............................................................ 6-179
 
Figure C3.4b: Mass spectroscopy of BA/OA ............................................................ 6-180
 
Figure C3.4c: Mass spectroscopy of BA/OA ............................................................ 6-181
 
Figure C4.1: 
1
H-NMR spectrum of BAA/OAA ........................................................... 6-182
 
Figure C4.2a: 
13
C-NMR spectrum of BAA/OAA ........................................................ 6-183
 
Figure C4.2b: 
13
C-NMR spectrum of BAA/OAA ........................................................ 6-184
 
Figure C4.3a: IR spectrum of BAA/OAA ................................................................... 6-185
 
Figure C4.3b: IR spectrum of BAA/OAA ................................................................... 6-186
 
Figure C4.3b: IR spectrum of BAA/OAA ................................................................... 6-187
 
Figure C4.4a: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-188
 
Figure C4.4b: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-189
 
Figure C4.4a: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-190
 
Figure C4.4b: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-191
 
Figure C4.4c: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-192
 
Figure C4.4d: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-193
 
Figure C4.4d: Mass spectroscopy of BAA/OAA ....................................................... 6-194
 
 
 

 
 
 
1-20 
 
 
Chapter one 
1. 
Introduction 
More  than  17  million  people  die  of  cardiovascular  diseases  (such  as  pulmonary 
hypertension,  stroke,  heart  attacks,  and  angina  pectoris)  annually  and  this  number  is 
expected  to  grow  to  more  than  23.6  million  by  2030  (Mozaffarian  et  al.,  2014).  A 
substantial number of the deaths can be attributed to pathological platelet  aggregation 
which  forms  clots  (thrombosis)  within  the  blood  vessel  and  disrupts  the  ease  of  blood 
circulation.  A  clot  within  the  vessel  can  break  and  begin  to  travel  around  the  body 
leading  to  an  embolus  formation  (Furies  and  Furies,  2008).  Unfortunately,  most  of  the 
currently used antiplatelet agents have been reported with undesirable side effects and 
drugs  resistance  (Armani  et  al.,  2009).  Therefore  provision  of  optimal  protection  from 
thrombosis  or  embolism  with  no  risk  of  side  effects  on  the  body  system  is  the  new 
frontier of research in antiplatelet therapy. This requires the identification of agents that 
can  block  undesired  pathological  thrombosis  without  altering  the  physiological 
protection of homeostasis.  
Natural  products,  which  are  chemical  compounds  or  substances  produced  by  living 
organisms  offer  new  opportunities  for  the  treatment  of  antiplatelet  aggregation.  The 
medicinal properties of various plants  traditionally used to cure different  ailments  have 
been  well  documented  (George  et  al.,  2001).  In  South  Africa,  which  is  a  developing 
nation,  indigenous  African  medicinal  plants  are  used  alongside  western  allopathic 
medicine to treat ailments (Van Wyk et al., 2004).  
This present study investigated the antiplatelet aggregation activity of betulinic acid and 
its acetyl derivatives from Melaleuca bracteata Revolution Gold. 
 
 

 
 
 
1-21 
 
1.1Structure of the thesis 
This thesis consist six chapters and appendices: 
Chapter One gives a brief background and motivation of the study 
Chapter Two gives the literatures review and. also described the aim and objectives of 
the study. 
Chapter Three gives the materials and methods used to conduct all the experiments in 
the study. 
Chapter Four gives the results obtained from the study. 
Chapter Five gives the overall discussion of the results 
Chapter  Six  gives  the  conclusion  obtained from  the  results  and  suggestion for further 
studies.  
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
2-22 
 
Chapter two 
2. 
Literature review 
Blood platelet hyperactivity is implicated in atherosclerosis plaques which are the major 
cause  of  cardiovascular  diseases  such  as  stroke,  heart  attack  and  pulmonary 
hypertension.  Cardiovascular  diseases  are  one  of  the  leading  causes  of  mortality 
(Patrono, 2001). 
Platelets, initially 
called ―
dust of the blood

, were discovered by James Homer Wright to 
be  produced  by  megakaryocytes  from  bone  marrow.  He  used  W
rights’  stain
  to 
distinguish  the  similarities  in  the  morphology  between  megakaryocytes  and  platelets 
(Kuter,  1996).  In  1837,  Osler  described  the  structure  of  platelets,  whereas  Bizzozero 
described their anatomy and was the first to identify megarkaryocytes in bone marrow, 
but  never  identified  them  as  the  precursor  of  platelets  (Kuter,  1996)..  Bizzozero 
recognized that platelets were responsible for hemostatic and thrombosis formation and 
demonstrated  that  platelets  adhere  to  ruptured  endothelial  blood  vessels  to  form 
aggregates (Kuter, 1996)..  
Platelets  are  anucleated  cells  that  have  a  discoid  shape,  with  a  diameter  of  1-  3  µm. 
They  are  formed  from  the  cytoplasm  of  megakaryocytes  (Kellie  et  al.,  2013).  The 
megakaryocytes are the largest cell (50- 100 µm) in which 0.01 % of nucleated cells are 
accounted  for  in  the  bone  marrow  (Pease,  1956).  During  platelet  formation, 
megakaryocytes  undergo  two  major  stages.  In  the  first  stage,  megakaryocytes

  DNA 
replicates  without  cellular  in  a  process  known  as  endomitosis.    This  stage  requires 
megakaryocytes growth factors but takes longer days to complete. The MKs cytoplasma 
proliferate and enlarge as it is filled with platelet specific granules, protein cytoskeletals 
and membranes for the platelet assembly process. The second stage takes an hour for 
completion,  the  MKs  firstly  remodel  their  cytoplasm  to  form  proplatelets,  which  later 
transform  into  preplatelets.  The  matured  preplatelets  then  elongate  and  divide 
repeatedly to form discoid platelets from their tips (Richardson et al., 2005). During the 
development  of  Platelets,  their  granular  contents  are  received  from  the  MK  cell  body. 
Platelets  are  then  released  into  the  blood  circulation  along  with  the  red  blood  cells 

 
 
 
2-23 
 
(RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) (May et al., 1998)Human platelets have a 7-9 day 
life span within the blood stream after formation, whereas rodents
’ platelets
 only have 4-
5 days to survive (Aster, 1967; Jackson and Edward, 1977). 
2.1 
Platelet structure 
Platelets are anucleated cells that comprise of organelles. These organelles are divided 
into three zones, each with specific functions (Figure 2.1).  
The  first  is  a  peripheral  zone  containing  glycocalyx,  which  is  a  thick  coat  around  the 
platelet  membranes  (Moake  et  al.,  1988).  The  platelet  membranes  consist  of  a  lipid 
bilayer  that  comprises  of  lipoproteins,  glycolipids  and  glycoproteins.  These 
glycoproteins  are  reported  to  be  responsible  for  platelet  antigenicity,  cellular  tissue 
compatibility  and  blood  group  (Matzdorff,  2005).  The  platelet  glycoproteins function  as 
receptors that aid in the transmission of external impulses through the cell membrane. 
The glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) enhances platelet adherence to the sub-endothelium through 
von  Willebrand  factor  (vWF)  binding.  The  platelet  membranes  house  glycoprotein  GP 
IIb/IIIa which serves as a receptor for fibrinogen, fibronectin and vWF during high shear 
to initiate platelet aggregation. They also house the receptors serotonin, ADP, thrombin, 
collagen and epinephrine that further strengthen platelet aggregation.  
The  second  zone,  called  the  Sol-Gel  zone  or  cytoskeleton,  contains  microtubules  and 
microfilaments.  The  microtubules  encase  each  platelet,  thereby  giving  them  a  discoid 
shape.  The  microfilaments  are  found  in  the  cytoplasm,  and  they  contain  contractile 
protein (actin and myosin). The actin accounts for 20 - 30 % of platelet protein, whereas 
myosin composes 2 - 5%.  
The third zone, called organelle, is the site of most platelet metabolic activity. Platelets 
have three types of storage granule; these include Alpha granules, dense granules and 
lysosomes. The Alpha granules are most abundant (20 - 200 per platelet) whereas the 
dense  granules  are  only  at  about  2  -  10  per  platelet.  The  storage  granules  have 
substance  with  mitogenic,  angiogenesis,  platelet  proaggregatory  and  vasoconstriction 
stimulating  effects  (Hartwig,  1991).    Alpha  granules  are  composed  of  different 
membrane proteins. Proteomic studies indicated that alpha granules contain numerous 

 
 
 
2-24 
 
proteins  (Coppinger  et  al.,  2004).  These  proteins  include  angiogenic,  and 
antiangiogenic,  pro-inflammatory  and  anti-inflammatory,  coagulant  and  anticoagulant, 
proteases  and  proteases  inhibitor.  The  contradictory  action  of  the  alpha  granules 
component has raised a lot of questions on how they effectively manage their biological 
functions  (Italiano  et  al.,  2008;  Blair  and  Flaumenhaft,  2009).  It  was  reported  that 
different  alpha  granules  have  distinct  components.  The  Immunofluorescence 
microscopy  was  used  to  demonstrate  that  fibrinogen  and  Von  Willebrand  factor  (vWf) 
are located in different granules (Sehgal and Storrie, 2007). The dense granules contain 
polyphosphates,  adenine  nucleotide,  cations,  and  amines  such  as  histamine  and 
serotonin. These are released during platelet activation to recruits more platelets to the 
site of damaged subendothelium (Sigel and Corfu,  1996). Platelets  cargo two types of 
lysosome (primary and secondary lysosomes). They contain cathepsin, acid hydrolases, 
CD63 and LAMP-2. They play major roles in endosomal digestion by breaking down of 
substances ingested by pinocytosis and phagocytosis (Flaumenhaft, 2013). 
 
                                                
Figure 2.1 Platelet structure (adapted from www.blogspot.co.za) 
 
 

 
 
 
2-25 
 
2.2 
Platelet activation 
In  a  healthy  endothelium  vessel,  microtubules  help  to  keep  platelets  inactive  by 
maintaining  their  discoid  shape.  The  healthy  endothelium  releases  prostacyclin 
(prostaglandin  I2)  and  inhibits  the  release  of  activating  factors  from  platelet  granules.  
But,  once  the  endothelials  are  insulted  through  rupture,  platelets  lose  shape,  adhere 
and spread over the injury site to stop bleeding or initiate the healing process. Platelet 
activation  entails  (a)  platelet  aggregation,  (b)  secretion,  (c)  stimulation  of  biochemical 
pathways  to  produce  thromboxane  and  other  agonists  that  amplify  more  platelet 
aggregations,  and  (d) 
activation  of  major  integrin  (αIIbβ3)
  and  Von  Willebrand  factor 
(vWF) receptors (Harrison et al., 1997). 
 
 
Figure 2.2: Mechanism of platelet activation (adapted from Jagroop et al., 2000) 
 
During  platelet  activation  (Figure  2.2)  biochemical  events  are  stimulated,  due  to  an 
increase in Ca
2+
 mobilization into the cytoplasm. The platelets lose their  disc shape to 
form finger

like projections (pseudopodia) from the cell peripheral and extended broad 
lamellae (Jagroop et al., 2000). The flattened platelets cause the organelle and granules 
to  concentrate  to  the  centre  giving  a   

fried  egg

  appearance  (Figure  2.3).  The 
compacted  platelets,  along  with  their  extended  dendrites,  enhance  adhesion  to  the 
damaged endothelium (Grundmann et al., 2003). The influx of Ca
2+
 into the cytoplasm 

 
 
 
2-26 
 
are  instigated  by  the  activation  of  the  phospholipase  C  pathway.  The  phospholipase 
hydrolyzes  polyphosphoinostide  (P
1
P
2
)  into  inositotriphosphate  (IP
3
)  and  diacylglycerol 
(Knofler  et  al.,  1998).  The  soluble  IP3  diffuses  into  the  cytoplasm  to  bind  to  dense 
granules and release stored calcium (Escolar et al., 1999). The G-prot
eins (βγ), coupled 
with  serpentine  receptors,  also  activate  the  phospholipase  C  pathway.  The  serpentine 
receptors  include  ADP  receptors  (P
2
Y
1
  and  P
2
Y
12
),  5HT  receptors  and  protease 
activated receptors (PAR

and PAR
3
). 
 
 

Yüklə 3,8 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə