A dissertation submitted in fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of doctorate of science in the department of biochemistry and microbiology, faculty of science and


Figure 2.3: Representative scanning electron microscopic (ScEM) showing activated



Yüklə 3,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/10
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü3,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Figure 2.3: Representative scanning electron microscopic (ScEM) showing activated 
platelets (5HT and ET1) (adapted from Jagroop et al., 2000). 
2.3 
Platelet receptors 
Platelet receptors (Figure 2.4), molecular functions, and signaling pathways have been 
widely  studied  by  researchers.  A  variety  of  transmembrane  receptors  are  found  on 
platelet  membranes,  such  as 
integrins (α
IIb
β
3

α
V
β
3
 
,  α
5
β
1
,  α
6
β
1

α
2
β
1
),  immunoglobulin 
superfamily  (GP  VI,  FcγRIIA)
,  tyrosine  kinase  receptors  (Gas-6,  thrombopoietin 
receptor,  ephrins  and  Eph  kinases),  G-protein  coupled  transmembrane  receptors 

 
 
 
2-27 
 
(GPCR)  (  P2Y
1
  and  P2Y
12
  ADP  receptors, PAR-1  and PAR-
4 thrombin receptors TPα 
and  TPβ  TxA
2
  receptors),  leucine-rich  repeated  (LRR)  receptors  (Toll-like  receptors, 
Glycoprotein  [GP]  Ib/IX/V),  C-type  lectin  receptors  (P-selectin),  and    other  types  (like 
CD63, CD36, P-selectin ligand 1, TNF receptor type) (Rivera et al., 2009).  
 
 
Figure  2.4:  Platelet  receptors-ligand  interactions.  Overview  of  well-known 
receptors  on  platelets  and  mode  of  activation  (adapted  from  Kauskot  and 
Hoylaerts, 2012).  
  
2.3.1 
Collagen receptors 
In  sub-endothelial  matrix,  collagen  makes  up  between  20  -  40%  of  total  protein 
constituents  in  the  aorta.  Apart  from  its  contribution  to  vascular  strength,  collagen 
supports platelet plug formation and platelet adhesion. There are nine types of collagen, 
of which  only the fibrillar type (I, III, V and VI) and non-fibrillar type (IV  and VIII)  show 
thrombogenic  properties.  Likewise,  platelets  have  six  collagen  receptors 
(α2β1,  p47, 

 
 
 
2-28 
 
p67, GPIV, THICBP and GPVI), 
but only GPVI and α2β1 integrin are crucial for 
binding 
to collagen and subsequent platelet activation (Nuyttens et al., 2011).  
2.3.1.1 
Glycoprotein VI receptors 
Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) receptor (63 kDa) is a member of the transmembrane receptor 
family.  It  consists  of  two  immunoglobulin  subunits  (Ig)  connected  to  a  glycosylated 
linker,  cytoplasmic  tail  and  a  transmembrane  domain.  They  are  expressed  in 
megakaryocytes and platelets (3,700 per platelet). The GPVI is found to associate with 
transmembrane  adaptor  FcRγ.  The  stabilization  of  FcRγ 
enhances  the  surface 
expression of GPVI receptors on platelet membranes. This is made possible via the salt 
bridge  between  FcRγ  (Asp  residue)  and 
the  GPVI  domain  (Arg  residue)
.  FcRγ  is  a 
homodimer containing one copy of an Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motif 
(ITAM),  which  is  defined  by  two  YxxL  sequences  separated  by  seven  amino  acids 
(Clemetson and Clemeston, 2001). ITAM motifs, phosphorylated by Src kinase (Lyn and 
Fyn)  are  in  contact  with  GPVI;  they  trigger  platelet  signaling  and  lead  to  platelet 
activation.  Monomeric  GPVI  displays  low  affinity  for  collagen,  whereas  dimeric  GPVI 
has  high  affinity  for  collagen  thus  initiating  platelet  signaling  (Miura  et  al.,  2002).  The 
defect of GPVI receptors are characterized with moderate bleeding. Studies of various 
mouse  models  lacking  GPVI  receptors  are  shown  to  lack  collagen  induced  platelet 
aggregation (Mangin et al., 2006; Massberg et al., 2003; Konstantinides et al., 2006). 
2.3.1.2 
α
2
β

integrins   
The  α
2
β
1
  integrin  is  a  collagen  receptor  with  a  130-
kDa  β1  chain  and 
a  150-
kDa  α
2
 
chain.  It  is  expressed  in  platelets 
(1,730  per  platelet).  The  α
2
  chain  houses  only  one 
domain  with  a  200  residue  sequence  (Clemetson  and  Clemetson,  2001).  Platelet 
activation  by  classical  agonists  causes 
the  rearrangement  of  α
2
β
1
  domains,  which 
increase appropriate ligand sequence affinity on collagen fibrils (Siljander et al., 2004). 
The 
defects of α
2
β
1
 integrin allelic polymorphism (G873A and C8O7T) are implicated in 
thrombotic episodes such as stroke and myocardial infarction (Moshfegh et al., 1999). 
 
 

 
 
 
2-29 
 
2.3.2 
Platelet CD148 receptors 
Platelet CD148 receptor  is a  tyrosine phosphatase on platelet  transmemembrane. It  is 
expressed  in  epithelial,  fibroblast,  endothelial  cell  and  hematopoietic  cells.  CD148  is 
reported  to  regulate  the  expression  of 
GPVI/FcRγ.  Mouse  models  lacking  CD148 
showed  reduced  GPVI  expression.  Likewise,  Scr  family  kinase  (SFK)  platelet  activity 
was attenuated. This result showed poor response to agonists that stimulate SFK, such 
as collagen and fibrinogen (Senis et al., 2009; Ellison et al., 2010). The defect of CD148 
receptors in some carcinoma diseases has been reported (Austschbach et al., 1999). 
2.3.3 
C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) 
C-type  lectin-like  receptor  2  (CLEC-2)  is  a  transmembrane  receptor  that  is  mapped  to 
chromosome  12.  It  consists  of  thirty  amino  acid  cytoplasmic  tails  that  house  YxxL 
sequences  known  as  (hem)  immunoreceptor  tyrosine  based  activation  motifs  (hem 
ITAM).  It  is  expressed  in  platelets,  megakaryocyte  and  neutrophil.  CLEC-2  was  first 
isolated  from  snake  venom  rhodocytin  in  the  Malaya  (Suzuki-Inoue  et  al.,  2006). 
Rhodocytin was demonstrated not 
to bind to integrin GPVI, α
2
β
1
 and GPIb
α but through
 
CLEC-2  receptors  to activate  platelet  aggregation  (Suzuki-Inoue et  al.,  2006).  CLEC-2 
plays a crucial role in the stabilization of thrombosis via hemophilic intersection (Hughes 
et al., 2010). 
2.3.4 
P
latelet integrin αII
b
β
3
 receptor 
The  p
latelet  integrin  αII
b
β
3
  receptor  is  found  in  abundance  on  the  platelet  membrane 
(40,000=  80,000  per  platelet).  The  subunits 
αIIb  and
 
β3  have
  128  kDa  and  95  kDa 
proteins  respectively.  The 
αII
b
β
3
  receptor  binds  to  RGD  containing  ligands  such  as 
vitronectin,  fibronectin,  fibrin,  thrombospondin,  Von  Willebrand  factor  and  fibrinogen. 
Fibrinogen  shows 
the  highest  binding  affinity  to  αIIbβ3  by  recruiting  more  intracellular 
proteins  and  triggers  the 
clustering  of  αII
b
β
3
  receptors  (Salsmann  et  al.,  2006).  The 
changes of αII
b
β
3
 receptors from low to high affinity are reported to be a fairly common 
pathway for platelet activation. Defects in 
αII
b
β
3
 receptors result in a diseased condition 
known  as  Glanzmann  Thrombasthenia  (GT).  GT  is  characterized  by  gastrointestinal 

 
 
 
2-30 
 
bleeding,  hematuria,  epistaxis,  gingival  hemorrhage  (Coller  and  Shattil,  2008;  Fiore  et 
al., 2011). 
2.3.5 
I
ntegrin α
v
β
3
 
The  integrin  α
v
β
3
  is  a  widespread  member  of  the  transmembrane  family.  They  are 
expressed  in  leukocytes,  smooth muscle, osteoblasts  and  endothelial  cells. 
α
v
β
3
  binds 
to  RGD  ligands  such  as  adeno-virus  penton,  vitronectin  fibronectin,  fibrinogen, 
thrombospondin  and  osteopontin.  Vitronectin  was  demonstrated  to  have  the  highest 
affinity for α
v
β
3
,  and  is  thus  referred  to as  the  preferred 
ligand for α
v
β
3

Activated α
v
β
3
 
integrins are found on atherosclerolsis plaque and on injured endothelial  lining, but not 
on normal vascular endothelials (Kasirer-Friede et al., 2007; Nurden, 2006). 
2.3.6 
P2Y1 receptors  
The P2Y1 receptor (42 kDa) is widely distributed and contains 377 amino acid residues.  
It is found in smooth muscle, blood vessels, the testes, neural tissue, ovaries, the heart, 
the prostrate, blood vessels and platelets. P2Y1 receptors are released from the platelet 
α  granules
.  P2Y1  receptors  are  induced  by  ADP  to  initiate  platelet  aggregation  and 
shape changes. They act via G
q
 coupled receptors for ADP. P2Y1 receptors account for 
20-30 % of the binding sites for ADP on platelet membranes (Gachet, 2008). 
2.3.7 
P2Y12 receptors 
P2Y
12 
receptor gene is mapped at chromosome 3q21-q25 and contains 342 amino acid 
residues. These receptors are found in smooth muscle, glial cells, endothelial cells and 
platelets. ADP stimulates P2Y
12 
receptors, whereas ATP and some of its trisphosphate 
analog  inhibits  P2Y
12 
receptor  activity.  They  act  through  G
i
-coupled  receptors  for  ADP 
which  reduce  adenylase  cyclase  activity.  Defects  in  P2Y
12 
receptors  are  characterized 
by  mucocutaneous  bleeding,  post-traumatic  and  post-surgical  hemorrhage  (Gachet, 
2008). 
 

 
 
 
2-31 
 
2.3.8 
P2X1 receptors 
The P2X1 genes are mapped at chromosome 17p13.2.  It has 399 amino acid residues 
with two transmembrane  domains (TM1 and TM2).   An extracellular domain consisting 
of  ten  cysteine  moieties  separates  the  two  transmembrane  domains  of  P2X1.  It  is 
expressed in platelets and megakaryocytes.  ATP released from dense granules binds 
to the extracellular domain of P2X1 receptors. This triggers a shape change of platelets 
and  increases  the  permeability  of  ions  such  as  Na
+
,  K
+
  and  Ca
2+
  in  the  extracellular 
matrix.  P2X1  was  demonstrated  to  amplify  platelet  activation  even  at  lower 
concentrations  of  other  agonists  (Oury  et  al.,  2004).  P2X1  has  been  considered  as  a 
safe  target  for  the  treatment  of  thrombotic  episodes,  due  to  its  mild  effects  on  platelet 
functioning (Hu and Hoylaert, 2010). 
2.3.9 
Thromboxane (TXA
2
) receptors 
Thromboxane  (TXA
2
)  is  synthesized  from  arachidonic  acid  via  the  cyclooxygenase 
pathway  that  bind  with  TXA

receptors  (Patron  et  al.,  2005).  TXA

receptors 
(
or  TP) 
(57kDa) have 
two isoforms (TPα and TPβ
), which differ in the C-terminal domains. The 
two  isoforms  reside  in  the 
platelet  membrane.  TPα  is  expressed  in  platelet
s  whereas 
TPβ  is  expressed  in  endothelial  cell
s  (Habib  et  al.,  1999).  They  activate  platelets 
through G- coupled proteins such as G
q
 and G
12/13 
(Hirata et al., 1996). 
2.3.10  Prostaglandin E
2
 (PGE
2
) receptors 
Prostaglandin  E
2
  (PGE
2
)  is  highly  expressed  during  inflammation  of  endothelilal  cells, 
smooth muscle and macrophages.  PGE
2
 exhibits biphasic effects on platelet function, 
depending  on  its  concentration.  At  low  concentration  platelet  activation  is  enhanced, 
whereas  at  high  concentrations  platelet  activtation  is  inhibited.  Four  G-coupled 
receptors (EP
1
, EP
2
, EP
3
 and EP
4
) activate PGE
2
. Each of these receptors possesses a 
distinct  intracellular  signal  and  pharmacological  signature.  EP3  receptors  enhance 
platelet  activation  by  increasing  the  influx  of  intracellular  calcium  and  P-selectin, 
whereas EP2 and EP4 inhibit platelet activation by increasing cAMP intracellular levels 
via  Gαs  protein
  (Ma  et  al.,  2001).    In  mouse  models,  the  EP3  receptor  has  been 

 
 
 
2-32 
 
implicated  in  atherosclerotic  plaque  (Gross  et  al.,  2007).  EP4  receptors  enhance  the 
platelet  inhibitory  action  of  Aspirin  and  can  be  used  more  effectively  as  an  antagonist 
(Philipose et al., 2010). 
2.3.11  Prostaglandin I

(PGI
2

Prostaglandin I

(PGI
2
)  is  synthesized  from  arachidonic acid.  It  is  widely  expressed  on 
vascular  endothelial  cells  and  platelets.  PGI
2
  serves  as  a  vasodilator,  an  inhibitor  of 
platelet  aggregation  and  maintains  vascular  smooth  muscle  integrity.  It  binds  to  the 
prostaglandin receptor (IP receptor) to inhibit platelet aggregation. The IP receptor (37-
41  kDa)  is  a  member  of  the  prostanoid  G-receptor  family  and,  upon  activation,  it 
enhances  the  expression  of  adenyl  cyclase  which  increases  intracellular  CAMP 
(Stitham et al., 2007). Synthestic salt of PGI

(Epoprostenol) was demonstrated to inhibit 
the interaction of platelet-leucocyte and platelet microparticle formation. Therefore, PGI
2
 
might be a potent inflammatory therapy for thrombosis (Tamburrelli et al., 2011). 
2.3.12  Thrombin receptors 
The ability of thrombin receptors to stimulate platelet aggregation is partially dependant 
on  GPIb-IX-V,  but  it  prefers  the  two  protease-activated  receptors  (PAR-1  and  PAR-4). 
GPIb  has  been  demonstrated  as  the  enhancer  of  thrombin  to  PAR-1  and  PAR-  4. 
Patients  lacking  GPIb  show  poor  thrombin  response  (Adam  et  al.,  2003).  PAR-1  and 
PAR-  4  are  activated  by  irreversible  proteolytic  cleavage  of  the  extracellular  loop;  this 
exposed the N-terminal that serves as the tethered ligand. PAR-1 is the major thrombin 
receptor which is stimulated at low concentrations, whereas PAR-4 serves as a back up 
receptor,  stimulated  at  high  concentrations.  PAR-4-triggered  Ca
2+
  influx  into  the 
intracellular matrix is slow but prolonged, whereas PAR1 Ca2+ mobilization is fast and 
easy to switch off (Oestreich, 2009). 
2.3.13  Eph kinases 
Eph  kinases  are  a  member  of  tyrosine  kinase  receptors  with  ephrin  as  the  preferable 
ligand.  It  is  expressed  on  the  cell  surface  and  has  an  extracellular  tyrosine  kinase 

 
 
 
2-33 
 
domain  and  an  intracellular  domain.  The  interaction  between  Eph  kinases  and  ephrin 
are  implicated  in  vasculogenesis  and  neuronal  patterning  (Prevost  et  al.,  2003).  The 
human cell expresses three isoforms of ephrin (Eph A4, ephrin B1 and EphB1). Eph A4 
or  Eph  B1  enhances  platelet  adhesion  to  fibrinogen  during  platelet  aggregation, 
whereas  ephrin  B1  interacts 
with  αIIbβ3  in  both 
a  resting  and  an  activated  state.  The 
activities  of  the  isoforms  are  enhanced  through  the  activation  of  Raph1,  a  member  of 
the Ras family that stimulates the activation of platelet integrins  (Prevost et al., 2003). 
2.3.14  Gas 6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) 
The Gas 6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) is a vitamin K dependent protein integrin. Gas 
6 plays an important role in cell adhesion, growth and migration through its association 
with TAM family receptors (Tyro 3, Mer and Axl tyrosine receptor). In humans, Gas 6 is 
mostly expressed in  plasma, whereas in  mice  it is predominantly found in  plasma and 
platelets. Gas 6 has been  demonstrated to play  a crucial role in  vascular  homeostasis 
and  thromobogenesis.  Gas  6  interacts  with 
αIIbβ3  outside
-in  signaling  through  the 
activation  of  AKt  and  PI-
3K  which  trigger  β3  phosphryl
ation  (Angelillo-Scherrer  et  al., 
2005). These processes describe the mechanism of ADP thrombus stabilization during 
platelet aggregation. (Cosemans et al., 2006, 2010). 
2.3.15  P-selectin receptors 
P-selectin (140 kDa) is a member of selectin family with a high adhesion affinity to the 
extracellular  matrix.  P-selectin  preferable  ligand  is  P-selectin  glycoprotein  ligand-1 
(PSGL-1)  which  is  predominantly  found  in  leukocytes  (Abdullah  et  al.,  2009).  The 
interaction between P-selectin and PSGL-1 enhances the tethering of activated platelets 
and  leukocytes  on  the  surface  of  endothelial  lining.  Tissue  factors  are  shown  to  play 
important  roles  in  the  fibrin  network  during  the  activated  coagulation  cascade.  This 
assists in the stabilization of thrombin formation. Tissue factors have been shown to be 
dependent on monocytes carried by microvesicles. The microvesicules are attached to 
the ongoing thrombus formation through the interaction of P-selectin and PSGL-1, thus 
delivering  tissue  factor  to  the  thrombus  (Morel  et  al.,  2008).  Mice  models  with  a 

 
 
 
2-34 
 
deficiency  in  either  P-selectin  or  PSGL-1  have  been  demonstrated  to  show  a  reduced 
thrombus size (Ramacciotti et al., 2009).  
The  receptor

ligand  interactions  are  important  for  the  recruitment  of  platelets  in 
circulation in  the damaged endothelials, thus enhancing platelet activation and platelet 
aggregation.  During  high  shear  stress  in  arterioles,  the  interaction  between  platelet 
receptors  (GPIb)  and  Von  Willebrand  factor  is  important  for  platelet  function.    Von 
Willebrand  factor  is  produced  and  stored  in  the  endothelial  matrix.  Likewise,  Von 
Willebrand  factor  is  recruited  to  bind  to  exposed  collagen  fibres  during  damage  to 
endothelial  lining  (Savage  et  al.,  1998).  The  Von  Willebrand  factor 

GPIb  complex 
forms  a  weak  adhesion  of  platelet  and  collagen  receptors  (GPVI)  complementing  the 
action  of  the  complex  by  strengthening  the  adhesion.  This  process  triggers 
conformational changes in β integrin on platelet membranes, thus increasing its affinity 
to  their  ligands.  The  platelet  adhesi
on  binds  to  collage  via  α2β1  intergin  to  initiate 
platelet  spreading,  whereas  platelet  adhesion  binds  via  αIIβ3  to  initiate  platelet 
aggregation by increasing fibrinogen binding affinity (Varga-Szabo et al., 2008). Platelet 
receptors  are  also  implicated  in  platelet  interactions  in  inflamed  endothelial  cells  and 
leukocyte interactions during pro-inflammatory activities (Pitchford et al., 2003). 
During  damage  to  the  vascular  endothelial,  the  subendothelail  collagen  fibrils  are 
exposed to endothelial factors in circulation such as the fibronectin, vitronectin, laminin, 
proteoglycans and Von Willebrand factor (Hoylaerts et al., 1997). Sub-endothelial VWF 
binds  to  collagen  VI  and  to  exposed  collagen  I  and  III  to  enhance  the  recruitment  of 
more  Von  Willebrand  factor  and  afford  multimetric  VWF  strands.  This  tethers  the 
platelet receptor GPIbα to in
itiate platelet rolling on ruptured endothelial lining (Wu et al., 
2000). The GPIbα (135 kDA) along with GPIbβ (26 kDa), GPV (82kDa) and GPIX (20 
kDa)  constitute  the  members  of  GPIb family.  The four  subunits  of  the  GPIb family  are 
encoded  to  gene  mapping  of  chromosome  17p12  (GPIBA),  22q11.2,  (GPIBB),  3q21 
(GP9)  and  3q29  (GP5)  respectively.  Most  of  the  encoded  genes  are  expressed  in 
platelets, and those that remain are expressed in endothelial cells (Wu et al., 1997). The 
GPIb domain sites accommodate the binding for mac-1, P-selectin and Von Willebrand 
factor. The GPIb domain serves as a receptor for coagulation factors (XI, XII), kininogen 

 
 
 
2-35 
 
and thrombin  (Bradford  et  al.,  2000;  Baglia  et  al.,  2002;  Lanza,  2006).  GPIbα  favours 
the binding of thrombin to its appropriate receptor (a protease activated receptor). The 
thrombin  cleavage  of  GPV  exposes  the  GPIbα
-IX,  and  thus  enhances  the  binding 
affinity of GPIbα to thrombin (Ramakrishnan 
et al., 2001). GPIb receptors are implicated 
in platelet inflammatory pathways by binding to endothelial cell P-selectin (Romo et al., 
1999).  Defects  in  GPIb  receptor  genes  can  result  in  a  diseased  condition  known  as 
Bernard-Soulier  Syndrome  (BSS).  This  is  characterized  by  larger  platelets,  prolonged 
bleeding times and thrombocytopenia (Poujol et al., 2002). 
2.4 
Platelet aggregation 
Platelet  aggregation  (Figure  2.5)  is  a  natural  process  in  which  thrombocytes  cluster 
together  to  help  prevent  bleeding  at  the  site  of  vascular  injury.  The  human  body  is  in 
equilibrium with the factors that prevent bleeding and the factors that prevent excessive 
blood  clotting  in  the  hemostatic  system.  The  hemostatic  system  helps  the  body  to 
maintain free vascular pathways by aiding the formation and breakdown of blood clots. 
Platelets play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis.  
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
2-36 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 2.5: Processes of platelets aggregation (adapted from Jackson, 2007) 
 
 

 
 
 
2-37 
 
2.5 
Hemostatic system 
Hemostatic  system  (Figure  2.6)  is  an  instinctive  response  of  the  body  to  prevent 
bleeding,  thereby  preventing  the  loss  of  blood.  Four  steps  occur  in  a  rapid  sequence 
during this process. These steps are listed below: 
Vascular spasm:  This is the first response to damaged blood vessels, causing vessels 
to constrict and prevent blood loss. It is triggered by factors such as the direct injury to 
vascular  smooth  muscle.  Cell  signaling  molecules  such  as  cytokines,  P-selectin, 
prostaglandins are released by endothelial cells, and platelets and refluxes initiated by 
local  pain  receptors  all  contribute  to  vascular  spasm.  The  spasm  response  increases 
according to the level of damage to the vessels (Marieb, 2012).   
Formation of platelet plugs: This is the second step, in which platelets stick together to 
form  a  temporary  seal  over  the  ruptured  vessels  and  degranulate.  The  degranulated 
platelets  release  cell  signaling  substances  such  as  adenosine  di-phosphate  (ADP), 
serotonin  and  thromboxane  A2.  These  cause  more  platelets  to  stick  to  the  region  of 
damage  and  release  their  contents.  As  more  chemicals  are  released,  more  platelets 
stick  together  to  form  larger  platelet  plugs.  Platelets  are  responsible  for  preventing 
vascular  damage  under  the  skin  on  a  daily  basis  (Clemerison,  2012).  Platelet  plug 
formation  is  activated  by  a  glycoprotein  called  Von  Willebrand  factor  (VWF),  which  is 
found in the blood plasma (Lassila et al., 2012). 
Coagulation  or  blood  clothing:  This  is  the  third  step,  in  which  coagulation  strengthens 
the  platelet  plugs  with  the 
fibrin threads that act as a ―molecular glue‖ (
Marieb,  2010).  
There are two pathways for blood coagulation: intrinsic and extrinsic. This converts pro-
thrombin  into  thrombin,  which  in  turn  converts  fibrinogen  into  the  fibrin  that  forms  the 
insoluble mesh during blood clotting (Porth, 2005). 
Within the coagulation pathways, the anti-thrombin regulator inhibits the effect of serine 
proteases.  This  is  achieved  by  preventing  the  conversion  of  zymogens  into  active 
factors.  The  pro-coagulant  and  anticoagulant  factors  maintain  the  balance  in  the 
vascular system (Stassen et al., 2004).  
Fibrinolysis. This is the fourth step in the hemostatic system, in which the break down of 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə