A dissertation submitted in fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of doctorate of science in the department of biochemistry and microbiology, faculty of science and


Figure 2.6: Biology of homeostasis system www.press.com/2010/06/biology-hemostasis



Yüklə 3,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/10
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü3,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Figure 2.6: Biology of homeostasis system www.press.com/2010/06/biology-hemostasis 

 
 
 
2-39 
 
The  activation  of  platelets  causes  changes  in  the  shape  of  platelet  morphology  and 
conformational  changes  in  the  glycoprotein  IIb/IIIa  receptors,  thereby  transforming  the 
receptors  from  a  ligand-unreceptive  state  to  a  ligand-receptive  state.  Ligand-receptive 
glycoprotein  Iib/IIIa  receptors  bind  fibrinogen  molecules,  which  form  bridges  between 
adjacent  platelets  and  facilitate  platelet  aggregation.  Inhibitors  of  glycoprotein  IIb/IIIa 
receptors  also  bind  to  glycoprotein  Iib/IIIa  receptors,  blocking  the binding  of fibrinogen 
and thus preventing platelet aggregation (Yerem, 2000). 
The  formation  of  blood  clots  (thrombus)  within  blood  vessels  can  be  physiological  or 
pathological. Physiological thrombus formation is controlled by a variety of receptors on 
the  platelet  surface.  The  receptors  participate  in  the  process  of  thrombosis,  i.e.  the 
platelet

mediated formation of a hemostatic plug. There are four steps in the formation 
of a thrombosis. These are: (1) the activation of platelet glycoproteins llb/llla (Gpllb/llla) 
by  different  agonists,  such  as  blood  proteins  and  enzymes;  (2)  platelet  adhesion  to 
vascular lesions by means of  cell receptors; (3) platelet aggregation into a large mass 
called thrombus; and (4) coagulation due to the platelet aggregation that facilitates the 
formation of an impervious three dimensional meshwork (Cook et al., 1994). 
Pathological  thrombus  formation  is  caused  by  platelet  hyperactivity  and,  when 
unchecked, could result in atherothrombotic diseases such as stroke, heart attacks, and 
pulmonary embolism (Huo and Ley, 2004).  
Platelet  dysfunctions  are  contributed  to  by  adenosine  diphosphate  (ADP),  thrombin, 
arachidonic  acid,  collagen,  epinephrine  and  other  factors  such  as  free  radicals, 
inflammation, stress and hypercholesterolemia. The thrombin activates platelets through 
two  protease

activating  receptors  (PAR),  PAR  1  and  PAR4,  belonging  to  G  protein

coupled  receptors.  ADP  can  only  bind  to  the  G  protein

coupled  P2Y1  receptor  and 
activates  phospholipase  C,  thus  resulting  in  an  increase  in  the  intracellular 
concentration of Ca
2+
 (Donna et al., 2001). 
2.6 
Acetylcholinesterase  
Acetylcholinesterase  (Figure  2.7)  is  a  member  of  carboxylesterase  family  that 
hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) into acetate and choline. They are 

 
 
 
2-40 
 
predominantly  found  in  conducting  fibres,  such  as  muscle,  sensory  and  motor  fibres, 
nerve,  noncholinergic  and  cholinergic  fibres,  and  central  and  peripheral  tissues 
(Massoulié  et  al.,  2008).  They  have  a  very  high  turnover:  a  molecule  of 
acetylcholinesterase hydrolyzes 2500 molecues of ACh per second (Taylor, 1994). The 
active binding site of the enzyme is divided into two sub-sites: the esteratic site and the 
anionic  site.  The  esteratic  site  is  where  the acetylcholine  is  hydrolyzed  to  acetate  and 
choline,  whereas  the  anionic  site  is  where  the  inhibitor,  the  quaternary  amine  of  ACh 
and the cationic substrate bind (Tripathi, 2008). During nerve signal transmission, ACh 
is  released  from  the  pre-synaptic  vesicle  of  nerve  cells  into  the  synaptic  cleft  to  bind 
ACh  receptors  at  the  post-synaptic  membrane  and  relay  the  nerve  signal.  ACh  at  the 
post-synpatic  nerve  terminates  the  signal  by  hydrolyzing  the  Ach  into  acetate  and 
choline. The liberated choline is used to synthesise more ACh at the pre-synaptic nerve 
by  combining  with  acetyl-CoA  in  the  presence  of  choline  acetyltransferase  (Purves  et 
al., 2008). 
In  maintaining  the  signal  transmission,  the  ACh  receptors  must  always  be  vacant  to 
accommodate another ACh. This occurs when there is a reduction in ACh concentration 
at  the  synaptic  cleft.  The  inhibition  of  ACh  at  the  post  synaptic  nerve  leads  to  the 
accumulation of ACh at the synaptic cleft, thus impeding nerve transmission (Pohanka, 
2012). 

 
 
 
2-41 
 
 
 
Figure 2.7: Mechanism of acetylchilinesterase adapted from www.peaknootropics.com  
 
The  loss  of  nerve  signal  transmission  can  result  in  neurodegenerative  diseases 
characterized  by  the  progressive  loss  of  function  or  structure  of  neurons,  particularly 
those of the central nervous system (CNS).  Protein aggregation in neurons could also 
contribute  to  the  progression  of neurodegeneration 
(Park, 2010).  Alzheimer’s disease 
(AD) is one of well-known neurodegeneration diseases.  AD is characterized by memory 
loss,  poor  judgment,  language  deterioration,  and  human  motor  and  perceptual  spatial 
skill deterioration. Cholinergic neurotransmission dysfunction in the brain contributes to 
prominent cognitive decline in AD. The damage to cholinergic cells results in a decrease 
in  concentration  of  ACh.  This  also  leads  to  the  accumulation  of  β
-
amyloid  (Aβ)  w
hich 
disrupts  synaptic  functioning  and  neural  networking.  The  amyloid  fibres  trigger 
pathological  cascades,  which  ultimately  culminate  in  neuronal  death  (Cramer  et  al., 
2012). 
Acetylcholine stimulates the NO released from the endothelial vasculature, which leads 

 
 
 
2-42 
 
to  the  relaxation  of  smooth  muscle  and  vasodilation  by  increasing  the  soluble  cGMP 
level. This mechanism inhibits platelet aggregation and adhesion (Andrew et al., 2001). 
Likewise,  prostacyclin  a  potent  antiplatelet  agent  is  also  released  from  endothelial 
vasculature  in  response  to  ACh.  This  stimulates  the  G-protein  stimulators  (Gs)  that 
stimulate  the  adenylate  cyclase  activity  which  increase  the  production  of  cyclic  AMP 
(Moncada, 1982). Acetylcholinesterase is also found in red blood cells. It constitutes the 
Yt  blood  group  antigen  (Purves  et  al.,  2008).  Acetylcholinesterase  functions  by 
terminating nerve signals and also reduces the supply of clotting factors into the blood 
stream (Sokratov and Skipetrov, 1977). 
Reversible  AChE  inhibitor  drugs  such  as  tetrahydroaminoacridine,  rivastiggmine  and 
donepezil are used in the treatment of AD. These drugs bind to the esteratic site of the 
AChE  for  a  short  time,  activating  their  therapeutic  effect  (Shaked  et  al.,  2009).  Some 
medicinal plants such as Pistacia atlantica and P. lentiscus have been demonstrated to 
inhibit AChE activity (Benamar et al., 2010). 
2.7 
Phosphodiesterase 
Phosphodiesterase (PDE) (Figure 2.8) is an enzyme that degrades the phosphodiester 
bond of secondary messengers such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 
cyclic  guanosine  monophosphate  (cGMP).  They  regulate  the  activity  of  the  cyclic 
nucleotide  signal  within  the  cellular  matrix.  They  are  therefore  important  in  the 
transduction  of  signals  mediated  by  secondary  messengers  (Conti,  2000).  PDE  are 
predominantly  found  in  the  brain  and  tissues.  It  is  classified  into  11  families  (PDE1-
PDE11)  based  on  their  regulation  properties,  substrate  specificities,  amino  acid 
sequences,  tissue  distribution  and  pharmacological  properties.  The  PDE  family  shows 
substrate selectivity; PDE (1, 2, 3, 10 and 11) hydrolyzed cAMP and cGMP, PDE (4, 7 
and 8) hydrolyzed cAMP whereas PDE (5, 6 and 9) hydrolyzed cGMP. The binding of 
either  cyclic  nucleotides  to  the  GAF-B  regulatory  domain  enhances  the  activity  of 
alternate nucleotides (Iffland, et al., 2005). 
The two intracellular secondary messengers, cAMP and cGMP, provide potent inhibitory 
activity on platelet aggregation. cAMP inhibits platelet aggregation by stimulating cAMP 

 
 
 
2-43 
 
dependent  intracellular  Ca
2+
  influx  whereas  cGMP  enhanced  the  production  of  the 
vasorelaxin  factor  that  inhibits  adhesion  and  aggregation  of  platelets  (Gresele  et  al., 
2011).  The  pharmacological  inhibition  of  PDE  prolongs  the  physiological  effects 
mediated  by  the  cyclic  nucleotides  (cAMP  and  cGMP).  Sildenafil  (Viagar)  selectively 
inhibits PDE5, which regulates the vasodilation of the artery to the corpus cavernosum 
through  cGMP.  This  process  enhances  prolonged  erection  and  could  thus  be  used  to 
treat  erectile  dysfunction  (Jeon,  2005).  Similarly,  Sildenafil  could  also  be  used  for  the 
treatment  of  benign  prostatic  hyperplasia  and  Duchenne  Muscular  Dystrophy  by 
enhancing myo and cardioprotective effects (Khairallah et al., 2008; Wang, 2010). 

 
 
 
2-44 
 
 
 
Figure 2.8: The Cyclic AMP Pathway (adapted from Moustafa and Feldman, 2014) 

 
 
 
2-45 
 
 
2.8 
Inflammation 
Inflammation  is  the  complex  biological  response  of  vascular  tissue  to  harmful  stimuli 
such as damaged cells, microbial activities and irritants (Ferrero, 2007). Inflammation is 
characterized  by  the  interaction  between  platelets,  endothelial  cells  and  leukocytes. 
During  infection,  the  endothelial  cell  is  activated  to  release  the  adhesion  molecules, 
such as endothelial  adhesion molecules  1 and intercellular adhesion molecules, which 
enhance the rolling of activated leukocytes to the site of infection. This process causes 
the  generation  of  reactive  oxygen  specie  by  leukocytes  which  trigger  the  secretion  of 
stored  pro-inflammatory  cytokines  and  chemokines  such  as  P-selectin,  E-selectin, 
CD40-L, and RANTES from activated platelet granules. The pro-inflammatory cytokines 
further  amplify  the  recruitment  of  more  leukocytes  to  the  site  of  infection  (Denisa  and 
Peter, 2003).  
Inflammation  also  contributes  to  the  platelet  aggregation  process  through  arachidonic 
acid pathways (Figure 2.9). Once the arachidonic acid is released from the membrane, 
phospholipid  is  converted  into  prostaglandins  and  leukotriene  by  phospholipase.  The 
prostaglandin  produced  is  then  converted  into  thromboxane  A2,  prostaglandin  I2, 
prostaglandin  E
2
  and  prostaglandin  D
2
  by  cyclooxygenases  that  interfere  with  the 
platelet aggregation process (Murphy, 2004).  

 
 
 
2-46 
 
 
Figure  2.9:  The  four  major  pathways  for  Arachidonic  acid  metabolism  (adapted 
from Smith, 2006).  
 
2.8.1 
Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2)  
Cyclooxygenase  (COX)  is  an  enzyme  that  plays  an  important  role  in  the  formation  of 
prostanoids, including thromboxane, prostaglandins and prostacyclin.  The inhibition of 
COX  by  non-steroidal  anti-inflammatory  drugs  (NSAID)  such  as  aspirin  and  ibuprofen 
reduce the symptoms of inflammation, pain and fever. COX is classified into two types 
(COX-1  and  COX-2)  (see  Figure  2.10).  COX-1  acts  as  a  constitutive  enzyme.  It  is 
required for normal physiological function, whereas COX-2 is an inducible enzyme that 
is produced during inflammation (Funk and Fitz-Gerald, 2007). 
The  COX-1  and  COX-2  have  similar  molecular  weights  (70  and  72  respectively), 

 
 
 
2-47 
 
identical  binding  sites  and  65%  homologous  amino  acid  sequences.  The  major 
difference  between  the  COX  isoenzymes  is  the  type  of  amino  acid  at  position  523; 
COX-1 has isoleucine, whereas COX-2 has valine. The smaller Val
523
 residue in COX-2 
allows  access  to  a  hydrophobic  side-pocket  in  the  enzyme  (which  Ile
523
  sterically 
hinders) (Hawkey et al., 2001; Schachte, 2003). 
NSAIDs  are considered nonselective because they inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2. The 
inhibitions  of  thromboxane  and  prostaglandin  synthesis  by  NSAID  have  analgesic, 
antithrombotic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects.  Gastrointestinal tract disorder 
is  the  common  side  effect  of  NSAID,  resulting  from  reduced  protection  from 
prostaglandin on  the  gastrointestinal mucosa (Wallace, 2008).  The inhibition of COX-2 
by  NSAIDs  accounts  for  the  anti-inflammatory  effect  of  the  drugs.  COX-2  inhibition 
decreases  prostacyclin  formation,  thus  increasing  the  thromboxane  imbalance  which 
leads to cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, heart attack and thrombosis (Kearney 
et al., 2008).  
 
Figure  2.10:  The  difference  between  COX-1  and  COX-2  (adapted  from  Dubois  et 
al., 1998). 
 
 
 

 
 
 
2-48 
 
2.9 
Reactive oxygen species 
Reactive Oxygen Species  (ROS) are  reactive  chemical molecules possessing oxygen. 
Examples  of  ROS  include  oxygen  ions  and  peroxides  like  superoxide  anion  (O
2
-
), 
hydroxyl radical (OH),  hypochlorous acid (HClO) and hydrogen peroxide (H
2
O
2
) (Valko 
et  al.,  2007).  These  are  formed  as  a  by-product  of  normal  cellular  metabolism.    ROS 
plays a dual role: it is either beneficial or harmful to living systems (Valko et al., 2006). 
The beneficial role of ROS occurs at low concentrations; this includes cellular signaling, 
immue  responses  and  mitogenic  responses.  The  harmful  role  of  ROS  occurs  at  high 
concentrations,  which  lead  to  cellular  damage  due  to  oxidative  stress  (Kovacic  et  al., 
2005;  Ridnour  et  al.,  2005).  The  oxidative  stress  (Figure  2.11)  is  caused  by  an 
imbalance  of  peroxidant  and  antioxidant  enzymes  in  the  living  organism  (Betteridge, 
2000).  This  results  in  cellular  damage  to  proteins,  lipids  and  DNA,  resulting  in  a 
reduction  in  their  normal  physiological  functioning.  Redox  homeostasis  protects  the 
living  organism  against  oxidative  stress  damage  by  maintaining  the  ROS  and 
antioxidant equilibrium (Droge, 2002). 
The  inter-relationship  among  ROS,  cancer  and  inflammation  has  been  demonstrated 
over  the  years  by  epidemiologic  and  experimental  research  (Gupta  et  al.,  2012).  
Inflammation  is  induced  by  the  expression  of  COX-2  by  ROS,  pro-inflammatory 
transcription  factors  (NF-
κB),  inflammatory  cytokines  (interleukin  6  (IL
-6),  chemokines 
(IL-8,  CXCR4),  and  interleukin  1  (IL-1),  tumor  necrosis  factor  alpha  (
TNFα)  (
Gupta  et 
al., 2012). 
 
 

 
 
 
2-49 
 
 
 
 
Figure 2.11: Oxidative stress (adapted from Conner and Grisham, 1996) 
 
 
 

 
 
 
2-50 
 
2.9.1 
Antioxidants 
Antioxidants  are  molecules  that  prevent  the  oxidation  of  other  molecules.  Oxidation 
involves  the  generation  of  ROS  which  develop  other  chains  of  reaction  that  could 
eventually  result  into  the  damage  of  cellular  components  such  as  proteins,  lipids  and 
DNA (Vertuani et  al.,  2004).  Antioxidants terminate the chain  of reaction by removing 
ROS  intermediates  and  preventing  other  oxidation.  ROS  includes  the  free  radical  O
2
-
and OH, HClO and H
2
O
2
 (Valko et al., 2007). ROS demonstrates involvement in redox 
signaling,  and  antioxidants  are  therefore  expected  not  to  totally  remove  ROS  but  to 
reduce ROS to optimum levels (Rhee, 2006).  
Antioxidants  are  classified  into  two  categories  based  on  lipid  or  water  solubility.    The 
lipid  soluble  antioxidants  protect  the  cell  membranes  from  lipid  peroxidation,  whereas 
water  soluble  antioxidants  prevent  oxidation  in  blood  plasma  or  cell  cytosols  (Sies, 
1997).  Most of the antioxidant may be synthesized by the body system or derived from 
diet (Vertuani et al., 2004). Antioxidants could be vitamins (A, C and E), enzymes (CAT, 
SOD  and  perioxidases)  and  other  low  molecular  weight  substances  (e.g.  Uric  acid) 
(Figure 2.12).  
2.9.1.1 
Superoxide dismutase 
SOD  (Figure  2.12)  is  a  metalloprotein  enzyme  that  catalyses  the  dismutation  of  the 
superoxide  radical  (O
2
-
)  to  oxygen  or  hydrogen  perioxide  (H
2
O
2
).  Superoxide  radicals 
are chemical toxins that are produced as by-product of the metabolism of oxygen, which 
causes cell damage (Alscher et  al., 2002). SOD is divided into three groups based on 
metal  cofactors  and  protein  folds.  These  include  the  Ni  type  (binds  to  nickel),  Cu/Zn 
type (binds to copper and zinc) and Fe and Mn type (binds to Fe or Manganese). The 
Cu/Zn  type  is  found  predominantly  in  cytosol,  whereas  the  Mn  type  is  common  in 
mitochondria.  The  Ni  type  is  usually  found  in  the  prokaryotic  cells  (Barondeau  et  al., 
2004; Borgstahi et al., 1992). 
Superoxide  dismutase  is  necessary  to  reverse  the  negative  effects  of  superoxides  on 
the  citric cycle. Superoxide inactive aconitase  is an enzyme that converts citric acid  to 
iso-citric  acid  in  the  citric  acid  cycle.  This  could  result  in  metabolic  poisoning  and  the 

 
 
 
2-51 
 
release of toxic iron into the extracellular tissue (Gardner, 1995). SOD also serves as an 
anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting endothelial activation, thus preventing endothelial-
leukocyte interactions and the expression of adhesion molecules (Segui et al., 2004). 
SOD occurs naturally in all living organisms. It is also available in dietary supplements 
and in injectable form. It is used in the treatment and prevention of diseases related to 
ROS  damage  (Lien  et  al.,  2008),  including  inflammatory  diseases  such  as  colitis, 
inflammatory bowel disorders and cancer (Beaugerie and, Itzkowitz, 2015). 
2.9.1.2 
Catalase 
Catalase (Figure 2.12) is an important antioxidant enzyme predominantly found in living 
organisms.  It  protects  cells  from  oxidative  stress  damage  by  reactive  ROS.  Catalase 
enhances the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to form water and oxygen (Chelikani 
et al., 2004). Catalase also acts as a reducing agent of various toxins and metabolites 
such  as  formaldehyde,  alcohols,  phenol,  acetaldehyde  and  formic  acid  (Ogura  and 
Yamazaki,  1983).  Cyanide  acts  as  a  competitive  inhibitor  of  catalase  at  high 
concentrations  of  hydrogen  peroxide,  whereas  heavy  metals  such  as  copper  and 
cations in copper (II) sulphate exhibit non-competitive inhibitors (Ogura and Yamazaki, 
1983). Arsenate serves as an activator of catalase at a high concentration of hydrogen 
peroxide (Kertulis-Tartar et al, 2009). 
The biological importance of catalase in living organisms is dispensable. Mice deficient 
in  catalase  are  found  to  be  phenotypically  normal.  However,  catalase  deficiency  has 
been  demonstrated  to  cause  type  2  diabetes  mellitus  (Ho  et  al.,  2004).  Hydrogen 
peroxide  is  used  by  antimicrobial  agents  against  pathogen  invasions  in  the  host. 
However, some pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni, Legionella pneumophila and 
Mycobacterium tuberculosis are able to survive in the host by producing catalase which 
decomposes  the  hydrogen  peroxide  to  form  water  and  oxygen  (Srinivasa-Rao  et  al., 
2003). 

 
 
 
2-52 
 
 
Figure  2.12:  Diagram  that  shows  how  SOD  and  Catalase  carry  out  their 
functions(adapted from 
www.final-yearproject.com
) 
2.10  Treatment of platelet aggregation 
Various  antiplatelet  drugs  decrease  platelet  aggregation,  and  thus  inhibit  thrombus 
formation.  They  are  effective  in  arterial  circulation  where  anticoagulants  have  effect.  
They  are  widely  used  in  the  primary  and  secondary  prevention  of  thrombotic 
cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases.  Most antiplatelet drugs are able to prevent 
the  formation  of  blood  clots,  significantly  contributing  to  the  management  of 
pathogenesis  in  cardiovascular  diseases  (Halt  and  Chandra,  2002).  However,  drug 
toxicity  occurs  when  multiple  antiplatelet  drugs  are  used  in  treatments.  The  most 
common  symptom  is  bleeding  of  the  gastrointestinal  tract  (Shehab  et  al.,  2012). 
Therefore  there  is  an  urgent  need  to  search  for  more  potent  drugs  from  natural  origin  
(Amani et al., 2009). 
2.10.1  Aspirin 
Aspirin  (Figure  2.13)  is  one  of  the  non-steroidal  anti-inflammatory  drugs  (NSAIDs) 
widely used as an antiplatelet agent. The Aspirin mechanism of action differs from other 
NSAIDs,  in  that  it  irreversibly  inhibits  cyclooxygenase  1  (COX-1)  instead  of 
cyclooxygenase  2  (COX-2),  as  is  the  case  for  other  NSAIDs  (Burke  et  al.,  2006). 
Cyclooxygenase is crucial in the production of thromboxane A
2
, a potent platelet agonist 

 
 
 
2-53 
 
and  vasoconstrictor.  Thromboxane  A
2
  triggers  platelet  aggregation  which  impedes  the 
normal flow of blood in the arteries. This process might lead to cardiovascular diseases 
such  as  stroke,  heart  attack  and  pulmonary  thrombosis.  Low  doses  of  Aspirin  are 
administered  to  patients  immediately  after  a  heart  attack  to  prevent  a  further  heart 
attack. Aspirin could also serve as an anticancer agent, especially in colorectal cancer 
(Algra and Rothwell, 2012).  
Aspirin  (ASA)  is  known  to  have  three  additional  mechanisms  of  action.  First,  it 
uncouples oxidative phosphorylation in hepatic mitochondria by diffusion from the inner 
membrane  into  the  mitochondria  matrix  where  it  ionizes  to  release  protons 
(Somasundaram et al. 2000).  Second, it enhances the production of NO radicals in the 
body  which  reduce  the  adhesion  of  leukocytes,  thus  preventing  inflammation  (Paul-
Clark et al., 2004). Third, it modulates the activity of NF-kB kappa, a transcription factor 
which plays a major role in inflammation (McCarty and Block, 2006).  
Aspirin is associated with some side effects. The prolonged use of Aspirin increases the 
incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (Aster et al., 2004). ASA disrupts normal platelet 
function,  reduced  cytoprotection  of  gastrointestinal  mucosa  by  Prostaglandin  E
2
  and 
enhances ulcerogenic effects through the stimulation of gastric mucosa, thus leading to 
gastrointestinal  tract  bleeding  (Liberopoulos  et  al.,  2006).  The  action  of  Aspirin  on 
thromboxane A2 are dose-dependent (>30mg/day), as are its side effects (Patron et al., 
2005).  It  was  demonstrated  that  lower  doses  of  Aspirin  (30mg/day)  resulted  in  less 
gastrointestinal  tract  complications  than  higher  doses  (1200mg/day)  (Farrelln  et  al., 
1991). 
 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə