A dissertation submitted in fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of doctorate of science in the department of biochemistry and microbiology, faculty of science and


Figure 2.13: Structures of Aspirin (adapted from Neault et al., 2000)



Yüklə 3,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/10
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü3,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Figure 2.13: Structures of Aspirin (adapted from Neault et al., 2000) 
  
2.10.2
 
 Clopidogrel 
 
Clopidogrel (Figure 2.14) belongs to the thienopyridine class of antiplatelet agents. It is 
widely  used  to  prevent  heart  attacks,  cerebrovascular  diseases  and  coronary  artery 
disease  (Anderson  et  al.,  2010).  Clopidogrel  irreversibly  inhibits  P2Y
12
  receptors,  thus 
reducing  the  activity  of  adenosine  diphosphate  (ADP)  as  an  agonist  in  platelet 
aggregation  (Duerschmied  et  al.,  2010).  Clopidogrel  can  serve  as  an  alternative 
antiplatelet  drug  for  patients  with  aspirin-induced  gastric  ulcers  (Chan  et  al.,  2005). 
Clopidogrel  is  a prodrug;  it  is  metabolized  to  its  active  form  in  the  liver  by  cytochrome 
P450 2 C19 (CYP2C19) to serve as an antiplatelet agent. The CYP2C19 enzymes are 
among  the  superfamily  of  cytochrome  p450.  They  are  monooxgenases  that  play  a 
crucial role in xenobiotic and lipid metabolism (Mistry et al., 2011). 
Clopidogrel has been associated with adverse side effects such as   thrombocytopenia 
purpura and hemorrhaging (Zakarija et al., 2004). This drug interacts with proton pump 
inhibitors  such  as  esomeprazole  or  omeprazole,  thereby  reducing  the  antiplatelet 
potential.  Clopidogrel  exhibits  less  antiplatelet  aggregation  effects  on  patients  who are 
on proton pump inhibitors (John and Koshy, 2012).  Studies  indicate that  patients with 
pulmonary  arteriosclerosis  show  aspirin  resistance  and  clopidogrel  might  be  the  best 
alternative antiplatelet agent (Diehm et al., 2004). 

 
 
 
2-55 
 
 
Figure 2.14: Structure of Clopidogrel (adapted from Shaw et 
al
., 2015) 
 
2.10.3  Dipyridamole 
Dipyridamole (Figure 2.15) is a drug with vasodilator and antiplatelet properties, derived 
from pyrimidopyridine. Dipyridamole inhibits  the activities phosphodiesterase, enzymes 
that break down cAMP. This increases the intracellular level of cAMP and reduces the 
binding  affinity  of  ADP  to  its  receptor  to  initiate  platelet  aggregation.  The  drugs  also 
plays a crucial role in triggering the release of prostaglandin  (PGI
2
) from the endothelial 
cells and inhibit the reuptake of adenosine by platelets, endothelial cells and red blood 
cells  leading  to  an  increase  of  adenosine  in  the  extracellular  matrix  (Sudlow,2005). 
Dipyridamole  is  used  to  lower  pulmonary  hypertension  without  a  change  in  systemic 
blood  pressure  (De  Schryver,  2003).  The  drug  has  been  implicated  in  preventing  the 
release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (MMP-9,  MCP-1) and  in the  inhibition of smooth 
muscle proliferation (Dixon et al., 2009). 
Dipyridamole  absorption  into  the  gastrointestinal  tract  is  pH-dependent,  therefore  the 
use of proton pump inhibitor in the treatment of a gastric ulcer might prevent absorption 
(Derendorf, 2005).  Dipyridamole is usually used along with aspirin as a dual therapy to 
effectively  combat  transient  ischaemic  attacks  and  stroke  (Halkes  et  al.,  2006).  In  a 
recent study, stroke patients treated with dipyridamole showed a significant reduction in 
thrombotic  episodes  when  compared  with  a  control.  In  addition,  the  combination  of 
dipyridamole and aspirin showed a more significant reduction in thrombotic episodes in 
comparison to dipyridamole alone (Leonardi-Bee et al., 2005).  

 
 
 
2-56 
 
 
Figure 2.15: Structure of Dipyridamole (adapted from Lin and Buolamwini, 2007) 
  
2.10.4   Ticlopidine 
Ticlopidine (Figure 2.16) is an antiplatelet agent in the family of thienopyridine. It inhibits 
ADP  receptors  on  platelet  membranes.  This  prevents  the  activation  of  glycoprotein 
llb/llla  integrins  which  increases  the  binding  affinity  of  fibrinogen  to  platelets.  It  is 
commonly  used  in  patients  who  do  not  tolerate  aspirin  and  clopidogrel.  However,  the 
drug  is  implicated  in  the  onset  of  neutropenia  and  aplastic  anaemia  (Bortolotti  et  al., 
2002). 
Ticlopidine, in combination with aspirin as a dual therapy, is found to be more effective 
in the treatment of recurrent vascular episodes in patients with vascular diseases (Tran 
et al., 2004). 

 
 
 
2-57 
 
 
Figure 2.16: Structure of Ticlopidine (adapted from Quinn and Fitzgerald, 1999) 
 
2.10.5   Cilostazol 
Cilostazol  (Figure  2.17)  is  a  derivative  of  quinolinone  which  is  commonly  used  as  an 
antiplatelet,  vasodilator  and  anti-thrombotic  (Chapman  et  al.,  2003).  Cilostazol  is 
reported to relieve intermittent claudication in patients with peripheral vascular diseases 
(Robless et al., 2008). Cilostazol selectively inhibits phosphodiesterase-III (PDE3) which 
increases  the  level  of  cAMP  in  the  extracellular  matrix.  This  leads  to  an  increase  in 
activated  protein  kinase  A  (PKA)  which  prevents  platelet  aggregation  by  reducing 
calcium mobilization from the saroplasmic reticulum. PKA also inhibits the activation of 
myosin light-chain kinase, the enzyme responsible for vasoconstriction, thereby exerting 
vasodilatatory effects. The main function of cilostazol is the vasodilation of the arteries 
of  peripheral  and  anti-platelet  aggregation.  The  drug  was  reported  to  improve  walking 
distance  and  cardiovascular  episodes  in  patients  with  a  stable  inspiratory  capacity 
(Storey, 2002). 
Cilostazol  is  well  tolerated,  but  has  unexpected  side  effects  such  as  headaches, 
palpitations,  increased  heart  rate,  rhinitis,  diarrhea,  peripheral  oedema  and  abnormal 
stool (Barnett et al., 2004). 

 
 
 
2-58 
 
 
Figure 2.17: Structure of Cilostazol (adapted from Basniwal et al., 2010) 
 
2.10.6  Sarpogrelate 
Sarpogrelate  (Figure  2.18)  is  a  drug  that  acts  as  an  antagonist  at  serotonin  receptors 
(5HT2A  and  5HT2B)  thereby  inhibiting  platelet  aggregation  induced  by  serotonin 
(Muntasir  et  al.,  2007).  In  mammals,  the  drug  is  metabolized  to  (R-S)-1-[2-[2-(3-
methoxyphenyl)ethyl[phenoxy]-3-(dimethylamino)-2-propanol-M-1through  the  hydrolysis 
of    its  succinate  ester  moiety  in  the  liver  (Saini  et  al.,  2004).  Serotonin  plays  an 
important  role  in  the  onset  of  atherothrombosis.  The  stored  serotonins  in  the  dense 
granules  of  platelets  are  released  during  platelet  activation.  This  stimulates  smooth 
muscle  proliferation,  endovascular  contraction  and  subsequent  thrombus  formation, 
which  may  lead  to  vessel  occlusion  (Nishihira  et  al.,  2006).  Sarpogrelate  was 
demonstrated  to  improve  endothelial  function  in  patients  with  peripheral  arterial 
diseases after oral administration for 12 weeks (Miyaza et al., 2007). 

 
 
 
2-59 
 
 
Figure 2.18: Structure of sarpogrelate (adapted from Park et al., 
2010
) 
  
2.10.7  GPIIb/IIIa Receptors Antagoinst 
GPIIb/IIIa  Receptors  are  found  on  the  platelet  membrane.  They  are  triggered  during 
platelet activation to bind fibrinogen or VWF and form crosslinks with platelets which are 
the common final pathway to platelet aggregation (Auer et al., 2003). GPIIb/IIIa receptor 
antagonists  are  divided  into  three  classifications:  monoclonal  anti-body  fragments 
(abciximab),  peptide  inhibitors  (eptifibatide)  and  non-peptide  inhibitors  (lamifiban  and 
triofiban) (Auer et al., 2003). These drugs are appropriate for diabetes and renal related 
diseases,  but  unsuitable  for  patients  scheduled  for  surgery  due  to  prolonged  bleeding 
(Tcheng et al., 2003).  
2.10.8   Picotamide 
Picotamide  (Figure  2.19)  is  an  antagonist  of  the  thromboxane  A
2
  receptor  (TXA
2
)  and 
prostaglandin  H  (PGH
2
).  It  is  a  derivative  of  methoxy-isophtalic  acid  and  has  been 
reported to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthase (Neri- Sereneri et al., 2004). The efficacy 
of  picotamide  as  an  antiplatelet  is  attributed  to  its  dual  action,  which  includes  the 
inhibition  of  platelet  aggregation  and  the  increase  in  production  of  antiplatelet 
aggregation and prostaglandins such as prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) (Gresele et al., 1991). 
Picotamide  was  reported  to  significantly  reduce  the  mortality  rate  (to  23%)  in  patients 
with peripheral arterial diseases when compared to a placebo (Balsano et al., 1993). 

 
 
 
2-60 
 
 
Figure 2.19: Structure of picotamide (adapted from Modesti et al., 1993) 
 
2.10.9  Beraprost 
Beraprost  (Figure  2.20)  is  an  orally  administered  drug  analogue,  with  similar 
pharmacodynamic  properties  to  prostaglandin  I
2
  (PGI
2
)  (Melian  et  al.,  2002).  The 
beraprost  mechanism  of  action  includes:  vasodilation,  which  leads  to  lower  blood 
pressure;  dispersion  of  abnormal  platelet  aggregates;  and  the  disruption  of  platelet 
aggregation  (Nishio  et  al.,  2001).  Beraprost  binds  to  PGI2  receptors  on  the  platelet 
membrane. This stimulates production of the adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase 
which  increase  the  levels  of  cAMP  and  cyclic  guanosine  monophosphate  (cGMP), 
respectively.  The  cAMP  and  cGMP  inhibit  calcium  influx  into  the  transmembrane  from 
the intracellular matrix. This process leads to the relaxation of the smooth muscle cell, 
thereby initiating vasodilaton (Melian et al., 2002). Beraprost is an appropriate drug for 
pulmonary hypertension and for the reperfusion of injured patients (Barst et al., 2003). 
 
Figure 2.20: Structure of Beraprost (adapted from Morrison et al., 2010) 
 

 
 
 
2-61 
 
2.10.10 Trapidil 
Trapidil  (triazolopyrimidine)  (Figure  2.21)  is  an  antiplatelet  drug  widely  used  to  reduce 
restenosis  after  percutaneous  coronary  angioplasty  (Maresta,  1994).  Trapidil  is  a 
platelet  derived  growth  factor  antagonist  (PDGF)  and  thus  serves  as  a  vasodilator. 
PDGF is triggered during vascular injury and plays a crucial role in smooth muscle cell 
proliferation,  extracellular  matrix  formation  and  inflammatory  cell  chemotaxis.  Trapidil 
was  demonstrated  to  reduce  the  incidence  of  cardiovascular  episodes  and  to  improve 
the prognosis in cardiovascular diseases (Hirayama et al., 2003). 
 
Figure 2.21: Structure of Trapidil (adapted from Vijaya et al., 2013) 
 
2.11  Recent developments in platelet aggregation inhibitors 
Explortation of medicinal plants extract as antiplatelet agents have gain new frontline in 
pharmaceutical  research.  Some  of  the  recent  investigated  antiplatelet  aggregation 
potential    of medicinal  plants  include;  ginisenosides  isolated from  processed  ginseng  
(Lee et al., 2010); flavonoids from Leuzea carthamoides (Koleckar et al., 2008); sulfur 
containing  compounds  extracted  from  Scorodocarpus  borneensis    (Lim  et  al.,  1999); 
non

glycosidic  iridoids  from  the  leaves  of  Canpsis  grandifora  (Jin  et  al.,  2005); 
aporphine  alkaloids  isolated  from  leaves  of  Magnolia  obovata    (Pyo  et  al.,  2003); 
crude  extracts  of  Euchresta  formosana    (Lo  et  al.,  2003);  phenolic  and  furan  type 
compounds  isolated  from  Gastrodia  elata  (Pyo  et  al.,  2004);  extracts  of  Cinnamomum 

 
 
 
2-62 
 
cassia    (Kim  et  al.,  2010);  amides  isolated  from  Pipe  taiwanese    (Chen  et  al.,  2007); 
and  dihydrochalcones  isolated  from  the  leaves  of  Muntingia  calabura  (Chen  et  al., 
2007);  Pentacyclic  triterpenoids  (Oleanolic,  Hederagerin,  Ursolic  acid,  Tormentic  acid 
Myrianthic acid) isolated from the leaves of Campsis grandiflora (Jin et al., 2010). 
2.12  Medicinal plants in traditional medicine 
World Health Organization (WHO) defines traditional medicine as the sum total of skills, 
practices  and  knowledge  based  on  experiences,  beliefs,  and  theories  indigenous  to 
various  cultures  that  are  used  to  diagnose,  prevent  and  treat  any  forms  of  ailment 
(WHO, 2009).  Several known medicinal plant species currently used today  have been 
part of traditional medicine going as far back as 2000 BC (Holt and Chandra, 2002). In 
most  developing  countries,  the  use  of traditional  medicine among  the  people  is  based 
on availability and affordability (Payyappallimana, 2010). The WHO estimates that 80% 
of the world populace depends on medicinal plants for their basic health care (George 
et al., 2001).  
 Africa  is  reported  to  be  endowed  with  enormous  medicinal  plant  resources.  It  is 
estimated that over 500,000 species can be found in forest regions alone (Farnsworth et 
al., 1985).  A large number of scientific publications are made available on the uses of 
some medicinal plants (Hutching et al. 1996;  Opoku et al., 2002; Iwalewa et al., 2007; 
Bibhabasu et al.,2008, Baccelli, 2010; Fasola, 2011; Osunsanmi et al., 2015).  
A large proportion of modern drugs are derived from medicinal plants (Govaerts, 2001; 
Thorne,  2002).  Medicinal  plants  are  therefore  the  best  source  for  new  drug  discovery 
(Anthony, 2005). For example, Cinchona succiruba yields quinine, an important source 
of antimalalrial (Fabiano-Tixier et al., 2011); Rauwolfia vomitoria produces reserpine, an 
antihypertensive  and  tranquilizer  (Yu  et  al.,  2013);  the  Calabar  bean  yields  serine  or 
physostigmine,  which  is  used  in  the  treatment  of  ophtalamia  diseases  (Triggle  et  al., 
1998);  Chrysanthemum  cinerariifolium  produces  pyrethrins,  which  are  used  as 
insecticide (Bradberry et al., 2005); Zingiber officinale produces gingerol, which is used 
as  a  carminative  (Ghosh  et  al.,  2011);  Agave  sisalana  produces  hecogenin,  which  is 
used in contraceptives (Elujoba, 2005). 

 
 
 
2-63 
 
Medicinal  plants  produce  chemical  compounds  called  secondary  metabolites,  such  as 
phenol, saponin, alkaloid, flavonoid and others (Tapsell et al., 2006).  These secondary 
metabolites  protect  the  plants  against  the  attacks  of  predators  and  also  play  an 
important  role in  their biological activities. The secondary metabolites are also used to 
fight  a  wide  range  of  human  diseases.  Over  12 000  compounds  have  been  isolated 
from medicinal plants (Tapsell et al., 2006). Herbal medicines do not differ from modern 
drugs  in  their  mechanisms  of  action.  This  is  based  on  the  fact  that  the  chemical 
compounds  in  medicinal  plants  mediate  their  effects  on  the  human  body  in  a  manner 
identical  to  modern  drugs.  This  makes  herbal  medicine  as  effective  as  modern  drugs 
(Lai  et  al.,  2004).  Over  122  of  the  chemical  compounds  identified  by  scientific 
researchers are derived from medicinal plants and used in modern drugs (Fabricant et 
al., 2001). 
2.13  Triterpenoids 
Triterpenes  are  a  class  of  natural  compounds  consisting  of  sterols  and  steroids.  They 
are abundantly found in plants and animals. Most triterpenes consist of a C-30 carbon 
skeleton  and  are  biosynthesized  from  squalene  (Figure  2.22).  Most  triterpenes  are 
produced from squalene through cyclization, ring expansions and molecular losses. An 
example of such triterpenes is cholesterol (Figure 2.23). There are over twenty groups 
of triterpenes.  
 
 

 
 
 
2-64 
 
 
The cyclization of squalene in a chair boat conformation produces the protostane cation. 
Lanostrane  (Figure  2.24),  derived  from  this  cation,  forms  most  of  the  precursor  of 
steroids found in animals, whereas cycloartane (Figure 2.25), derived from a cation by 
cyclization  between  C9-C19,  forms  most  of  the  terpenoids  in  plants  (Buckingham, 
1996). These triterpenoids are widely called phytosterol (Buckingham, 1994). 
 
                                  Figure 2.22: Structure of squalene (Buckingham, 1994) 
 
                                      Figure 2.23: Structure of Cholesterol (Buckingham, 1994) 
Figure 2.24: Structure of 
Lanostrane(Buckingham, 1994) 
Figure 2.25: Structure of Cycloartane 
(Buckingham, 1994) 

 
 
 
2-65 
 
Over  2500  triterpenes  have  been  investigated  for  their  biological  and  pharmacological 
activities.  These  include  antimicrobial,  antimutagenic,  anti-inflammatory,  anti-hiv, 
antitumor  and  anticancer  activities  (Connoly  et  al.,  2008,  Zaidi  et  al.,  2005,  Lin  et  al., 
2003, Qian et al., 2007). The activities of some triterpenes were demonstrated to inhibit 
the  action  of  multi-drug  resistance  (Molnar  et  al.,  2006).  Tanachatchairatana  et  al., 
(2008) demonstrated that a triterpene esterified by cinnamic acid inhibited the activities 
of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
2.14  Betulinic acid 
Betulinic acid (Figure 2.26) is found in the outer bark of several species of plants, but is 
common in the white birch (Betula pubescens) from where its name is derived. It yields 
up to 22 % dry weight (Tan et al., 2003). Betulinic acid is among the naturally occurring 
classes of pentacyclic triterpenoids which reportedly show anti-neoplastic (Fulda et al., 
1999),  anti-angiogenesis  (Mukherjee  et  al.,  2004),  antiplasmodial (Ziegler  et  al.,  2004) 
antiretroviral  (Huang  et  al.,  2006;  Qian  et  al.,  2007),  anti-viral  (Parlova  et  al.,  2003;  
Baltina  et  al.,  2003),  antioxidant,  anti-tumour,  anthelmintic,  anti-inflammatory  and 
antiplatelet  (Mukherjee  et  al.,  1997;  Liu  et  al.,  2004;  Habila  et  al.,  2011;  Habila  et  al., 
2013) activities. 
HO
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
H
CO
2
H
H
CH
3
H
3
C
H
3
C
CH
2
H
 
Figure 2.26: Structure of Betulinic acid (adapted from Osunsanmi et al., 2015) 
 

 
 
 
2-66 
 
2.15  Melaleuca bracteata  
Melaleuca bracteata is a genus in the myrtle family Myrtaceae with fine scented foliage 
and profuse white flowers appearing in all seasons. It is commonly called black tea tree, 
paper  bark,  river  tea  tree,  punk  tree,  honey  myrtle,  golden  bottle  brush,  snow  in  the 
summer tree, and white cloud tree. There are well over 2000 recognized species, most 
of  which  are  endemic  to  Australia  (Craven,  2008).  Melaleuca  bracteata  var.  revolution 
gold  (Figure  2.27)  is  widely  found  in  South  Africa  where  it  is  commonly  referred  to  as 
Johannesburg  gold.  These  species  are  shrubs  and  trees  growing  from  2  -  30  m  tall, 
often  with  exfoliating  bark.  The  leaves  are  evergreen,  alternately  arranged,  ovate  to 
lanceolate,  1-  25  cm  long  and  0.5  -  7  cm  broad  with  an  entire  margin,  dark  green  to 
grey-green in colour. The flowers are produced in dense clusters along the stems, each 
flower has a small petal and a tight  bundle of stamens about  7- 8 mm long  fused into 
five  bundles  (each  containing  about  20  stamens)  opposite  the  petals;  flower  colour 
varies from white to pink, red, pale yellow or greenish. The fruit is a small capsule about 
2 - 3 mm in diameter containing numerous minute seeds about 0.5 

 0.8 mm long. The 
fruits  aggregate  into  cylindrical  masses  along  sections  of  the  twigs.  They  are  found  in 
woodlands and open forests along watercourses and on the edges of swamps (Craven, 
2008). 
 
Figure 2.27: Melaleuca bracteata var. revolution gold (adapted from Osunsanmi et 
al., 2015) 

 
 
 
2-67 
 
 
2.15.1   Scientific classification of Melaleuca bracteata 
Kingdom:  
Plantea 
Plant subkingdom:   Tracheobionta 
Super division:  
Spermatophyta 
Division:  
Magnoliopsida 
Class:  
Magmoliopsida 
Subclass:  
Rosidae 
Order:  
Myrtales 
Family:  
Myrtaceae 
Genus:  
Melaleuca L 
Species:  
Melaleuca bracetata    
(Barlow, 1998) 
2.15.2  Some other Melaleuca genuses 
There are various melaleuca genuses from the family of Myrtaceae. These include; 

  Melaleuca acuminate 

  Melaleuca lternifolia 

  Melaleuca agathosmoides 

  Melaleuca adnata 

  Melaleuca acacioides 

  Melaleuca acerosa 

  Melaleuca amydra  

  Melaleuca alsophila 

  Melaleuca adenostyla   

  Melaleuca bracteata       

 
 
 
2-68 
 
(Aboutabl et al., 1998) 
2.15.3   Economic importance of Melaleuca bracteata var. revolution gold 
Melaleuca bracteata var. revolution gold (Figure 2.26) is cultivated widely because of its 
compact  shape  and  ability  to  grow  in  different  environmental  conditions.  The  plant  is 
pest  and  disease  free,  and  is  cultivated  mostly  in  tropical  regions  of  South  Africa  and 
other tropical areas worldwide. In Australia, it is used as a food plant and an ornamental 
plant (Craven and Lepschi, 1999). 
The  leaves  of  Melaleuca  bracetata  are  commonly  used  by  traditional  healers  for  the 
treatment and prevention of diseases; the leaves are chewed to alleviate headache and 
other  ailments.  The  flexibility  and  softness  of  the  stem  bark  of  this  plant  made  it  an 
important  tree  for  aboriginal  people.  The  stem  bark  is  used  as  a  sleeping  mat,  food 
wrapper, a raincoat, for bandages, and for sealing holes in canoes (Byrnes, 1986).  
The  wood  is  hard,  heavy  and  durable,  and  it  could  thus  be  used  for  poles  and  posts. 
The  trees  also  serve  as  good  shelter  and  could  potentially  be  used  in  the  control  of 
erosion (Craven and Lepschi, 1999). 
The  essential  oil  from  Melaleuca  bracteata  has  been  demonstrated  to  have  good 
antifungal  and  antibacterial  properties,  and  eliminates  warts  and  the  human  papilloma 
virus (Cribb and Cribb, 1981; Oliva et al., 2003). The Melaleuca bracteata oil is a major 
component  in 

Burn  aid

,  a  commonly  used  first  aid  treatment  for  minor  burns.  This 
Melaleuca  bracteata  oil  is  also  used  in  pet  fish  medications,  such  as  Bettafix  and 
Melafix  (Takarada,  2004).    These  medications  are  use for  the  treatment  of fungal  and 
bacterial  infections  (Hammer,  2003;  Mondello,  2003).  The  Melaleuca  bracetata  oil  is 
also used as a germicidal, insecticidal and as an antiseptic (Yatagai, 1997). 

Yüklə 3,8 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə