A genome-wide crispr screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes



Yüklə 8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix14.01.2017
ölçüsü8 Mb.
  1   2   3

Article

A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in Toxoplasma

Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes

Graphical Abstract

Highlights

d

CRISPR enables the first genome-wide loss-of-function



screen in T. gondii

d

The screen measures each gene’s impact during infection of



human fibroblasts

d

Functional assays validate the essentiality of formerly



uncharacterized proteins

d

An invasion factor found in all apicomplexans is essential in



malarial parasites

Authors


Saima M. Sidik, Diego Huet,

Suresh M. Ganesan, ..., Vern B. Carruthers,

Jacquin C. Niles, Sebastian Lourido

Correspondence

lourido@wi.mit.edu

In Brief


The first genome-wide genetic screen of

an apicomplexan parasite identifies an

invasion factor essential for the fitness of

all parasites in this phylum, including

those causing malaria and toxoplasmosis.

Sidik et al., 2016, Cell 167, 1–13

September 22, 2016

ª 2016 Elsevier Inc.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.08.019


Article

A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in Toxoplasma

Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes

Saima M. Sidik,

1,7

Diego Huet,



1,7

Suresh M. Ganesan,

2

My-Hang Huynh,



3

Tim Wang,

1,4,5

Armiyaw S. Nasamu,



2

Prathapan Thiru,

1

Jeroen P.J. Saeij,



6

Vern B. Carruthers,

3

Jacquin C. Niles,



2

and Sebastian Lourido

1,8,

*

1



Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2

Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA



3

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA

4

Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA



5

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

6

Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA



7

Co-first author

8

Lead Contact



*Correspondence:

lourido@wi.mit.edu

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.08.019

SUMMARY


Apicomplexan parasites are leading causes of human

and livestock diseases such as malaria and toxoplas-

mosis, yet most of their genes remain uncharacter-

ized. Here, we present the first genome-wide genetic

screen of an apicomplexan. We adapted CRISPR/

Cas9 to assess the contribution of each gene from

the parasite Toxoplasma gondii during infection of

human fibroblasts. Our analysis defines

$200 previ-

ously


uncharacterized,

fitness-conferring

genes

unique to the phylum, from which 16 were investi-



gated, revealing essential functions during infection

of human cells. Secondary screens identify as an in-

vasion factor the claudin-like apicomplexan micro-

neme protein (CLAMP), which resembles mammalian

tight-junction proteins and localizes to secretory or-

ganelles, making it critical to the initiation of infection.

CLAMP is present throughout sequenced apicom-

plexan genomes and is essential during the asexual

stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falcipa-

rum. These results provide broad-based functional

information on T. gondii genes and will facilitate

future approaches to expand the horizon of antipara-

sitic interventions.

INTRODUCTION

Apicomplexans comprise a phylum of over 5,000 obligate para-

sites whose hosts span the animal kingdom (

Levine, 1988

).

Several species are leading causes of infant mortality, such as



Plasmodium and Cryptosporidium spp., which cause malaria

and severe diarrhea, respectively (

Checkley et al., 2015; World

Health Organization, 2014

). Toxoplasma gondii, predicted to

establish lifelong infections in a quarter of the world’s population,

can cause life-threatening disease in immune-compromised in-

dividuals or when contracted congenitally (

Pappas et al.,

2009


). Despite their importance to global health, apicomplexans

remain enigmatic. Only a handful of species have been studied,

and fewer than half of their genes have been functionally anno-

tated. The ease with which T. gondii can be cultured, along

with the genetic tractability that comes with its balanced nucle-

otide composition and high transfection rates, presents compel-

ling arguments for using this parasite as a model apicomplexan.

Scalable methods to assess gene function in T. gondii could

therefore greatly extend our understanding of apicomplexan

biology.


Genetic crosses have long been used to identify loci respon-

sible for phenotypes ranging from drug resistance in Plasmo-



dium falciparum (

Wellems et al., 1991

) to virulence in T. gondii

(

Saeij et al., 2006; Taylor et al., 2006



). However, completing the

sexual cycles of T. gondii or Plasmodium spp. in cats or mosqui-

toes is challenging, and the traits examined must vary within the

species. Spontaneous mutations, or those induced chemically or

by transposition, can sample a wider range of phenotypes

(

Crabb et al., 2011; Farrell et al., 2014; Flannery et al., 2013



),

but the population size required to achieve saturation is imprac-

tical, and causal mutations are often difficult to identify.

Gene deletion collections, such as those available for fungi

(

Winzeler et al., 1999



), can aid functional analysis of eukaryotic

genomes. With this aim, large-scale efforts have generated col-

lections of knockout vectors for P. falciparum (

Maier et al.,

2008

) and Plasmodium berghei (



Gomes et al., 2015

), which


have led to the functional annotation of dozens of genes in

both species. However, similar approaches have not been

adapted to T. gondii, despite the advantage of both high trans-

fection rates and a continuous culture system. The recent

adaptation of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic

repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 has further enhanced the genetic trac-

tability of T. gondii (

Shen et al., 2014; Sidik et al., 2014

). This

technology has the advantage of being easily reprogrammable



by changing the 20 bp of homology between the single

guide RNA (sgRNA, or guide) and the genomic target (reviewed

in

Sander and Joung, 2014



). The endogenously high rates

of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in T. gondii make it

well suited to CRISPR-mediated gene disruption by efficiently

creating frame-shift mutations and insertions at the cleavage

site (

Sidik et al., 2014



).

Cell 167, 1–13, September 22, 2016

ª 2016 Elsevier Inc. 1

CELL 9138

Please cite this article in press as: Sidik et al., A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in

Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes, Cell

(2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.08.019


Several studies have developed CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-

wide genetic screens for mammalian cells (

Koike-Yusa et al.,

2014; Shalem et al., 2014; Wang et al., 2014

). These screens use

lentiviral libraries of sgRNAs to generate pools of mutants that

can be exposed to selective pressures. The integrated sgRNAs

can be used as barcodes to measure the contribution of targeted

genes to cell fitness. Despite the lack of viral transduction, we

adapted CRISPR/Cas9 for pooled screening in T. gondii. We pre-

sent the first genome-wide genetic screen performed in any api-

complexan. We demonstrate the power of this approach using

both positive and negative selection strategies. This approach

provides the first complete survey of contributions to parasite

fitness, cataloguing the

$40% of genes needed during infection

of human fibroblasts. Based on this analysis, we were able to

pinpoint previously uncharacterized conserved apicomplexan

proteins necessary for the T. gondii lytic cycle. We demonstrate

that one of these proteins acts as an essential invasion factor

and is also required by the malaria parasite P. falciparum to com-

plete its asexual replication cycle. This protein is conserved

throughout the phylum, providing an important molecular link to

the invasion process of distantly related apicomplexans. Our anal-

ysis demonstrates the potential of genetic screens in T. gondii to

uncover conserved biological processes and provides a transfor-

mative tool for parasitology.

RESULTS


Constitutive Cas9 Expression Maximizes Gene

Disruption in T. gondii

Highly efficient gene disruption and stable integration of the

sgRNA are necessary to develop large-scale CRISPR screens.

Transient expression of SpCas9 and an sgRNA in T. gondii can

disrupt a targeted gene in

$20% of parasites (

Sidik et al.,

2014

). We reasoned that constitutive Cas9 expression, prior to



introducing the sgRNA, might increase the likelihood of gene

disruption. We transfected parasites with a Cas9-expression

plasmid carrying a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT)

selectable marker (pCas9/CAT;

Figure 1

A). However, repeated

attempts failed to isolate Cas9-expressing parasites, suggesting

that Cas9 expression is detrimental to T. gondii, as has

been suggested for other microorganisms (

Jiang et al., 2014;

Peng et al., 2014

). We hypothesized that expression of a

‘‘decoy’’ sgRNA (pCas9/decoy;

Figure 1


A) could prevent toxicity

that might arise from unintended Cas9 activity directed by

Figure 1. Expression of Cas9 Maximizes

Gene Disruption in T. gondii

(A) Constructs used to constitutively express Cas9

in T. gondii. The sequence of the decoy sgRNA is

highlighted (blue), followed by the Cas9-binding

scaffold (orange).

(B) Immunoblot showing expression of FLAG-tag-

ged Cas9 (green) in the strain constitutively ex-

pressing the transgene. ACT1 serves as a loading

control (red).

(C) Cas9 localizes to the parasite nucleus.

ACT1 provides a counterstain and DAPI stains

for host-cell and parasite nuclei. Scale bar,

10 mm.


(D) Chromatogram showing the presence of the

decoy in the Cas9-expressing strain.

(E) The sgRNA expression construct with the py-

rimethamine-resistance selectable marker (DHFR).

The targeting sequence of the SAG1 sgRNA

is highlighted. The timeline indicates the period

of pyrimethamine (pyr) selection (if applied),

passaging to new host cells (P1), and the immu-

nofluorescence assay (IFA).

(F) Representative micrographs showing intra-

cellular parasites 3 days post-transfection.

Parasites were stained for SAG1 (green) and

ACT1

(red).


Host-cell

and


parasite

nuclei


were stained with DAPI (blue). Scale bar,

60 mm. The efficiency of SAG1 disruption

in wild-type and Cas9-expressing parasites

was measured following different treatments.

Mean ± SD for n = 2 independent experi-

ments; **p < 0.005.

wt, wild-type. n.d., not detected.

2 Cell 167, 1–13, September 22, 2016

CELL 9138

Please cite this article in press as: Sidik et al., A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in

Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes, Cell

(2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.08.019



endogenous RNAs. For this purpose, we used an sgRNA that ap-

peared non-functional against the 3

0

UTR of NHE1. Co-transfec-



tion of pCas9/CAT and pCas9/decoy readily yielded Cas9-ex-

pressing parasites, confirmed by immunoblotting (

Figure 1

B)

and immunofluorescence (



Figure 1

C). As predicted, the Cas9-

expressing strain retained the decoy locus (

Figure 1


D), reinforc-

ing its requirement for constitutive Cas9 expression.

We assessed the efficiency of gene disruption in the Cas9-ex-

pressing strain by expressing an sgRNA against the surface

antigen SAG1. Pyrimethamine treatment of the population

selected for stable integration of the sgRNA expression

vector (pU6-DHFR), which carries the resistant allele of dihydro-

folate reductase (DHFR;

Figure 1

E). SAG1 provides a reliable

measure of gene disruption, because it is dispensable yet stably

maintained in cultured parasites (

Kim and Boothroyd, 1995

).

3 days after transfection with the sgRNA construct, 70% of



Cas9-expressing parasites had lost SAG1 expression. Pyrimeth-

amine selection further improved SAG1 disruption to 97%

over the same time period (

Figure 1


F). The high efficiency of

CRISPR-mediated gene disruption in Cas9-expressing para-

sites provided the platform for large-scale genetic screens in

T. gondii.

A Genome-scale Genetic Screen Identifies Genes

Involved in Drug Sensitivity

We designed a library of sgRNAs containing ten guides against

each of the 8,158 predicted T. gondii protein-coding genes us-

ing previously described criteria (

Wang et al., 2014

). The library

was cloned into the sgRNA expression vector (

Figure 1


E). 40%

of the parasites that survived transfection integrated the vector

into their genomes (data not shown). We could therefore mea-

sure the relative abundance of each integrated sgRNA by

next-generation sequencing. Since the frequency of a given

sgRNA corresponds to the relative abundance of parasites car-

rying the targeted disruption, the change in relative abundance

from the composition of the plasmid library before transfection

indicates the enrichment or depletion of a given mutant. We

defined the average log

2

fold change in abundance for sgRNAs



targeting a given gene as the ‘‘phenotype’’ score for that gene

(

Figure 2



A). To determine whether we could maintain diversity

over time, we transfected the library into both wild-type and

Cas9-expressing parasites and sampled the populations after

each of three lytic cycles (

Figure 2

B, left). The representation

of guides against all genes remained stable over the course of

the experiment in the absence of Cas9. In contrast, sgRNAs

against specific genes were lost from the Cas9-expressing

population (

Figure 2

C), indicating that a diverse set of mutants

had been generated.

To investigate the compatibility of our screen with positive-se-

lection strategies, we treated pools of mutants with 5-fluoro-

deoxyuridine (FUDR), which is toxic to parasites through its

incorporation into pyrimidine pools. Three lytic cycles after trans-

fection with the library, we split the Cas9-expressing parasites

into cultures with or without FUDR (

Figure 2


B, right). As ex-

pected, FUDR-treated cultures recovered slowly, and untreated

cultures were passaged two or three times over the same period.

Measuring the sgRNAs in the two populations revealed that

FUDR strongly selected against uracil phosphoribosyltransfer-

ase (UPRT) activity, observed as an increased abundance of

sgRNAs against UPRT and the highly reproducible phenotype

score for the gene (

Figures 2

D and 2E). Since loss of UPRT—a

component of the pyrimidine salvage pathway—is known to

confer FUDR resistance (

Donald and Roos, 1995

), this experi-

ment demonstrates the power of this approach to rapidly and

efficiently identify positively selected mutants from a T. gondii

population.

A Genome-scale Genetic Screen Identifies

Fitness-Conferring Genes in T. gondii

Loss of sgRNAs from a population of mutants can serve to iden-

tify genes that contribute to cellular fitness (

Wang et al., 2015

). In

the context of our T. gondii screen, the changes in sgRNA repre-



sentation observed after the third lytic cycle provided a conve-

nient measure of a gene’s contribution to fitness. This time point

resembled the gene rankings of later cycles (

Figure 2


F) while

minimizing the chance of stochastic guide loss. We calculated

the mean phenotype score for each parasite gene from four

biological replicates of the screen. Genes that contribute to para-

site fitness, represented by negative scores, were distributed

throughout the genome and did not segregate by gene length

or position on the chromosome (

Figure 3


A). Gene set enrichment

analysis (GSEA) (

Croken et al., 2014; Subramanian et al., 2005

)

showed that genes predicted to be essential, like those encoding



ribosomal and proteasomal constituents, were enriched in low

phenotype scores (

Figure 3

B). Genes that encode components

of the apicoplast—a plastid common to most apicomplex-

ans—showed a similar enrichment, in accordance with the

essential metabolic functions performed by this organelle

(

Seeber and Soldati-Favre, 2010



). In contrast, specialized secre-

tory organelles like the micronemes, dense granules, and rhop-

tries had fewer genes with low phenotype scores, possibly re-

flecting functional redundancy or dispensability in cell culture

(

Figure 3


C).

We analyzed the screen results for 81 genes previously re-

ported to be either dispensable or essential for T. gondii growth

in human fibroblasts (

Table S1

). The two groups of genes were

clearly segregated on the basis of their phenotype scores (p =

6.7


3 10

À16


), with lower scores for the essential genes (

Fig-


ure 3

D). The most prominent outlier was RAB4, which appeared

to be essential based on overexpression of a dominant-negative

allele (


Kremer et al., 2013

). However, we readily obtained RAB4

knockouts that grew normally (

Figure S1

), demonstrating its

dispensability in cell culture. We therefore excluded RAB4 and,

for consistency, other genes classified by overexpression exper-

iments from subsequent analyses. To predict which genes might

contribute to parasite fitness, we compared the phenotype score

and distribution of sgRNAs for each gene to the values of 40

known dispensable genes. Using 10-fold cross validation on

the set of control genes, we estimate this method can classify

genes with >95% accuracy. Based on these results, we expect

$40% of T. gondii genes significantly contribute to parasite

fitness under the conditions tested.

To further classify the fitness-conferring genes, we compared

our predictions to other measures of gene function. Genes that

are not expressed during the examined developmental stage

are more likely to appear dispensable. Accordingly, only 6.9%

Cell 167, 1–13, September 22, 2016 3

CELL 9138

Please cite this article in press as: Sidik et al., A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in

Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes, Cell

(2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.08.019



of the fitness-conferring genes were found in the lowest quartile

of expression, in contrast to 38.6% of genes predicted to be

dispensable (

Figure 3


E). Genes under purifying selection are

also more likely to be essential (

Jordan et al., 2002

). Low ratios

of non-synonymous to synonymous mutation rates (d

N

/d



S

) are


consistent with purifying selection. Comparison of syntenic

genes between related species or other T. gondii strains re-

vealed the expected enrichment for low phenotype scores

among genes with low d

N

/d

S



values (

Figures 3

F and

S2

). As an



extension of the same principle, genes found in a greater propor-

tion of eukaryotic genomes are more likely to be essential. To

test this prediction, we assessed the depth of conservation of

T. gondii genes using ortholog groupings of 79 eukaryotic ge-

nomes available through OrthoMCL DB (

Chen et al., 2006

). The


distribution of phenotype scores within each category followed

the predicted trend, which correlated depth of conservation

with contribution to fitness and functional annotation (

Figure 3


G).

The strong agreement of our results with published observations

and expected trends allows us to confidently predict which

genes will contribute to parasite fitness.

Functional Characterization of Fitness-Conferring

Genes Conserved in Apicomplexans

We focused our efforts on the

$200 fitness-conferring genes that

lacked functional annotation and were only present in apicom-

plexans, which we called indispensable conserved apicom-

plexan proteins (ICAPs). We examined the subcellular localiza-

tion of 28 ICAPs using CRISPR-mediated endogenous tagging

to introduce a C-terminal Ty epitope into each targeted gene

(

Figure 4



A). 3 days post-transfection,

$60% of the populations

Figure 2. Using Pooled Screens to Identify Genes Responsible for Drug Sensitivity

(A) Schematic depiction of the pooled CRISPR screen. Cas9-expressing parasites are transfected with the sgRNA library and grown in human foreskin fibroblasts

(HFFs). At various time points, sgRNAs are amplified and enumerated by sequencing to determine relative abundance and phenotype scores for individual genes.



Yüklə 8 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə