Abstract: Arctic and alpine plants like



Yüklə 1,23 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.07.2017
ölçüsü1,23 Mb.

Research Paper

Abstract:

Arctic and alpine plants like Oxyria digyna have to face

enhanced environmental stress. This study compared leaves

from Oxyria digyna collected in the Arctic at Svalbard (788N)

and in the Austrian Alps (478N) at cellular, subcellular, and ultra-

structural levels. Oxyria digyna plants collected in Svalbard had

significantly thicker leaves than the samples collected in the

Austrian Alps. This difference was generated by increased thick-

ness of the palisade and spongy mesophyll layers in the arctic

plants, while epidermal cells had no significant size differences

between the two habitats. A characteristic feature of arctic, al-

pine, and cultivated samples was the occurrence of broad stro-

ma-filled chloroplast protrusions, 2 – 5 μm broad and up to 5 μm

long. Chloroplast protrusions were in close spatial contact with

other organelles including mitochondria and microbodies. Mito-

chondria were also present in invaginations of the chloroplasts.

A dense network of cortical microtubules found in the meso-

phyll cells suggested a potential role for microtubules in the for-

mation and function of chloroplast protrusions. No direct inter-

actions between microtubules and chloroplasts, however, were

observed and disruption of the microtubule arrays with the anti-

microtubule agent oryzalin at 5 – 10 μM did not alter the appear-

ance or dynamics of chloroplast protrusions. These observations

suggest that, in contrast to studies on stromule formation in



Nicotiana, microtubules are not involved in the formation and

morphology of chloroplast protrusions in Oxyria digyna. The ac-

tin microfilament-disrupting drug latrunculin B (5 – 10 μM for

2 h) arrested cytoplasmic streaming and altered the cytoplas-

mic integrity of mesophyll cells. However, at the ultrastructural

level, stroma-containing, thylakoid-free areas were still visible,

mostly at the concave sides of the chloroplasts. As chloroplast

protrusions were frequently found to be mitochondria-associat-

ed in Oxyria digyna, a role in metabolite exchange is possible,

which may contribute to an adaptation to alpine and arctic con-

ditions.

Key words:

Actin, chloroplast, chloroplast protrusion, high Alps,

high arctic, latrunculin B, microfilaments, microtubules, oryza-

lin, stromules.



Abbreviations:

DIC:


differential interference contrast

DMSO:


dimethyl sulfoxide

MF:


actin microfilament

MT:


microtubule

NA:


numerical aperture

PBS:


phosphate buffered saline

PIPES:


piperazine-1,4-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid

EGTA:


ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N

,N′-

tetraacetic acid

Introduction

Arctic and alpine plants have to face enhanced environmen-

tal stress in their natural habitats. They have developed multi-

ple strategies to cope with this situation (for a summary see

Körner, 2003). Among physiological adaptations, temperature

tolerance and enhanced photosynthetic performance have

been described.

Oxyria digyna is a well studied arctic- and alpine-specialized

plant, with data available on numerous characters in different

ecotypes (Billings et al., 1961; Mooney and Billings, 1961; Bill-

ings et al., 1971; Chrtek and Sourková, 1992; Heide, 2005). Oxy-



ria has been found to be protected against high temperatures

by respiration inhibition and other adaptation mechanisms

(Semikhatova et al., 1985; Tolvanen and Henry, 2001). Protec-

tion against cold temperatures has been described (Engel et al.,

1986 a, b; Koroleva et al., 1994; Pyankov and Vaskorskii, 1994).

The plant has been investigated concerning oxalate metab-

olism (Bornkamm, 1969), unusual chemical compounds (Zhou

et al., 2001), the occurrence of epicuticular waxes (Lütz and

Gülz, 1985), and photosynthetic pigments (Gerasimenko et

al., 1993; Lütz and Holzinger, 2004). Non- and cold-acclimated



Oxyria plants have also been investigated for susceptibility to

photoinhibition, zeaxanthin formation, and chlorophyll fluo-

rescence quenching (Koroleva et al., 1994).

Despite its adaptability to withstand arctic and alpine environ-

mental conditions, Oxyria digyna can also be cultivated under

standard laboratory conditions. The maximum total photosyn-

thesis was found to range between 21 8C and 28 8C (Engel et al.,

1986 a; Koroleva et al., 1994; Kurets et al., 2002), a feature that

may explain why cultivation is relatively easy. This is impor-

Investigating Cytoskeletal Function in Chloroplast Protrusion

Formation in the Arctic-Alpine Plant Oxyria digyna

A. Holzinger

1

, G. O. Wasteneys



2

, and C. Lütz

1

1

Department of Physiology and Cell Physiology of Alpine Plants, Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestraße 15,



6020 Innsbruck, Austria

2

Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 6270 Univ. Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T 14Z, Canada



Received: May 16, 2006; Accepted: October 7, 2006

Plant Biol. 9 (2007): 400 – 410

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

DOI 10.1055/s-2006-924727 · Published online January 19, 2007

ISSN 1435-8603

400


tant for rigorous laboratory techniques involving live cell

imaging, cryo-preservation or immunolabelling.

The present study focuses on chloroplast behaviour and chlo-

roplast interactions with the cytoskeleton and with other or-

ganelles. The latter are likely to play important roles in phys-

iological responses. Therefore, in situ fixation for the transmis-

sion electron microscope (TEM) has been performed at the

growth site to document adaptation of the plants in their nat-

ural environment. The first examination at the ultrastructural

level of alpine-adapted plants involved Ranunculus glacialis, a

plant growing up to 4270 m a.s.l. in the European Alps (Lütz

and Moser, 1977; Lütz, 1987). A large number of microbodies

with high catalase activity were described. These microbodies,

as well as mitochondria, were found to be in close contact with

long chloroplast protrusions (described as “proliferations” in

these publications). Chloroplast protrusions consist of broad

thylakoid-free stroma portions, occurring mostly on the lati-

tudinal ends of chloroplasts. A possible interaction between

these organelles to enhance photorespiration and protect

against photoinhibition was discussed, but not studied. Chlo-

roplast protrusions have also been described for the two high-

er plant species found in Antarctica (Gielwanowska and Szczu-

ka, 2005; Lütz et al., 2006), suggesting that this phenomenon

is common to plants growing in both alpine and polar environ-

ments. A recent analysis of cell structures in leaves from six

high-alpine plants has shown that chloroplast protrusions are

very abundant and well-developed in Oxyria digyna (Lütz and

Engel, 2007).

Are these chloroplast protrusions of alpine and arctic plants

analogous to the recently defined stromules? Stromules are

thin (less than 800 nm wide) stroma-filled projections of plas-

tids, and most prominent in non-green plastids, e.g., leuco-

plasts (Köhler and Hanson, 2000; Gray et al., 2001; Kwok and

Hanson, 2004 a). In contrast, the chloroplast protrusions of

alpine and arctic plants are significantly larger and appear in

photosynthetic tissues. Despite these differences, they may,

like the speculated function of stomules, facilitate organelle

contact, increase chloroplast surface area and stromal content.

In this study, we compared structural features of leaves of Oxy-

ria digyna from arctic and high alpine growth sites. Morpho-

logical differences were conspicuous at the tissue level, while

prominent chloroplast protrusions were found in mesophyll

cells from both ecotypes. The cytoskeleton plays a role in chlo-

roplast organization (Kandasamy and Meagher, 1999), and

there is some evidence that stromule formation depends on

the activities of actin microfilaments (MFs) and microtubules

(MTs) (Kwok and Hanson 2003, 2004 b). We therefore exam-

ined cytoskeletal involvement in the formation and behaviour

of chloroplast protrusions through the use of MT and MF dis-

rupting drugs.

Materials and Methods

Plant material and study sites

Specimens of Oxyria digyna were collected in Svalbard (Spitz-

bergen) in Ny-Ålesund, Norway, 78855

′N, 11856′E, 10 m a.s.l.

and in the Austrian Alps in the Pitztal 47834

′N, 10849′E,

2600 m a.s.l. near Innsbruck, Austria. Additionally, plant mate-

rial was raised from seeds collected in the Austrian Alps and

cultivated in a growth chamber at 20 8C, 14 h light (approx.

400 μmol photons m

–2

s

–1



), 10 h darkness.

Cryo SEM

Cryo scanning electron microscopy was performed with a

Hitachi S 4700 Cryo SEM. Oxyria digyna leaves were rapidly

frozen in sub-cooled liquid nitrogen at approx. – 210 8C in an

Emitech K 1250 freezing device. Samples were then kept at

about – 170 8C and examined with or without gold coating

in a vacuum of 1 – 5 × 10

–5

mbar. Excess water was sublimed



by a temperature increase from – 138 8C to – 95 8C within the

vacuum chamber for 20 min.



Inhibitor treatments

Leaf sections were treated with 5 μM and 10 μM oryzalin

(Supleco, Bellefonte, USA) or 5 μM and 10 μM latrunculin B

(Sigma) for 2 h, with DMSO used as a solvent in all treatments

and controls at 0.2 %. Control and drug-treated cells were

examined with a Zeiss 200 M microscope using a 63 × 1.4 NA

objective lens. Images were collected with a Zeiss Axoicam

MCR5. Inhibitor-treated samples were fixed for TEM as de-

scribed below.

Microtubule staining

MT staining was carried out by the freeze shattering method

(Wasteneys et al., 1997). Leaf samples were fixed for 40 min

in 0.5 % glutaraldehyde and 1.5 % formaldehyde in buffer con-

taining 50 mM PIPES, pH = 7.2, 2 mM EGTA, 2 mM MgSO

4

. Sam-



ples were washed in the same buffer containing 0.05 % Tri-

ton X-100. Samples were then frozen in liquid nitrogen and

freeze-shattered between two glass slides by compressing

them with a pair of pliers. Samples were transferred to perme-

abilization buffer containing PBS and 1 % Triton X-100 for 1 h.

Subsequently, samples were transferred to PBS (pH = 7.4) for

10 min, followed by a 20-min incubation in PBS containing

1 mg · ml

–1

NaBH


4

. Primary antibody incubation (Sigma B 512

anti alpha tubulin, 1 : 1000) was carried out overnight at 4 8C,

secondary antibody (Alexa conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG,

1 : 200) was applied for 1 h at 37 8C. Samples were mounted in

Citifluor AF1 antifade agent and examined with a Biorad Multi-

photon microscope using Lasersharp 2000 software or a Zeiss

Pascal CLSM, 63 × 1.4 NA objective lens. Excitation was gener-

ated with an argon laser at 488 nm. Long pass (LP) 560 nm fil-

tered emission and band pass (BP) 505 – 530 nm filtered emis-

sion were recorded simultaneously. Z stacks were captured

and projections generated with ImageJ software (freeware).



Histology and TEM of leaf samples

Approximately 2 × 2 mm pieces of freshly harvested leaves

were cut with a razor blade and fixed with 2.5 % glutaraldeyde

for 2 h in 50 mM sodium cacodylate buffer, pH 7.0 at 20 8C,

rinsed and post-fixed in 1 % OsO

4

in the same buffer for 12 h



at 4 8C. Samples were dehydrated in increasing concentrations

of ethanol (10%, 20 %, 40 %, 60 %, 80 %, 90 %, 95 %, 100%), each for

20 min, infiltrated with Spurr’s resin (Serva, Heidelberg, Ger-

many), and polymerized for 8 h at 70 8C. Ultrathin sections

were post-stained and examined with a Zeiss EM 902 trans-

mission electron microscope or a Zeiss Libra 120 EFTEM at

80 kV or 120 kV. Images were captured with a ProScan Slow

Cytoskeleton-Independent Chloroplast Protrusions

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

401


Scan CCD camera system using iTEM 5.0 software (Soft Imag-

ing System GmbH).

In addition, semithin sections (0.7 μm) were toluidine blue-

stained and examined on a Zeiss Axiovert 200 light microscope

with a 63 × 1.4 NA objective lens for measurements of leaf, epi-

dermis, palisade, and spongy parenchyma thickness.



Statistics

Thickness of the leaves, epidermis, palisade, and spongy pa-

renchyma were compared between samples collected in the

Austrian Alps and samples collected in Svalbard (n = 10). The

comparison was undertaken on semithin sections prepared

from the different samples. Mean value ± standard deviation

(SD) calculations and t-test comparisons were undertaken us-

ing SPSS software (SPSS Inc. Chicago, Ill.).



Results

Comparative anatomy of alpine and arctic leaves

Oxyria digyna leaf anatomy was examined on semithin sections

of embedded samples (Figs. 1 a, b) and by cryo SEM (Figs. 1 c, d).

The adaxial epidermis contained irregularly shaped pavement

cells, the abaxial epidermis had additional secretory trichomes

and stomatal guard cells (Figs. 1 a – c). The leaves had a bifa-

cial architecture, with palisade and spongy parenchyma cells

(Figs. 1 a – c). The adaxial epidermal cells were significantly (t-

test, < 0.001) larger (61.4 ± 8.7 μm, given as mean value ± SD,

the same for all subsequent values) than the abaxial epider-

mal cells (31.5 ± 7.3 μm) but there were no significant differ-

ences in the size of either adaxial or abaxial epidermal cells be-

tween the two sampling sites. Measurements of the leaf thick-

ness performed on semithin sections of embedded material

revealed a statistically significant (t-test, < 0.001) differ-

ence between samples (each n = 10) collected in the Austrian

Alps (314.3 ± 33.5 μm) and Svalbard (538.2 ± 72.7 μm). The in-

creased leaf thickness in the arctic ecotype was correlated with

greater thickness of both the palisade parenchyma (Austrian

Alps: 99.0 ± 17.3 μm, Svalbard: 232.8 ± 51.6 μm) and spongy

parenchyma (Austrian Alps: 125.6 ± 35.4 μm, Svalbard: 230.2 ±

37.4 μm) layers (t-test, < 0.001). Samples raised in growth

chambers from seed collected in the Austrian Alps had approx-

imately the same sizes for all measured parameters as samples

collected in the Austrian Alps (data not shown).



Chloroplast protrusions

Chloroplast protrusions were visible in live leaf sections from



Oxyria digyna examined under DIC optics (Fig. 2 a). These

structures were found in most mesophyll cells; no difference

was found between the palisade and spongy parenchyma cells.

Chloroplast protrusions were, however, more abundant when

chloroplasts were not as densely packed. These structures

were polymorphic and dynamic, with size and shape changing

continuously. The chloroplast protrusions were from 2 to 5 μm

broad and up to 5 μm long. They frequently established close

spatial contact with smaller spherical organelles. When sam-

ples were examined by TEM, this close contact was confirmed.

Mesophyll cells of Oxyria digyna exhibited a typical arrange-

ment of nuclei, mitochondria, golgi stacks (Fig. 2 b), starch-

containing chloroplasts, and microbodies (Fig. 2 c). Chloroplast

protrusions were evident as stroma-containing regions emerg-

ing from the chloroplast body, either at the lateral edges or the

concave side (Figs. 2 c – f). In TEM micrographs mostly longitu-

dinal sections through chloroplasts were observed, exhibiting

the lens-shaped organization of this organelle, with the con-

cave side pointing towards the cell cortex, and the convex side

facing the centre of the cell. These structures were observed in

samples collected in the Austrian Alps (Figs. 2 c, f) as well as in

samples collected in Svalbard (Figs. 2 d, e). The shape of chloro-

plast protrusions was irregular, with invaginations frequently

observed (Figs. 2 d – f). In most cases, a close association be-

tween chloroplasts, microbodies, and mitochondria was ob-

served (Figs. 2 c – e). In addition, golgi stacks were often found

in the vicinity of other organelles, such as within invaginations

of the nucleus (Fig. 2 b). In cells connected to the vascular tis-

sue, styloid crystals were found in vacuoles, likely to be com-

prised of oxalate (Fig. 2 g).



Microtubule organization

Immunofluorescence labelling by a freeze-shattering method

revealed that mesophyll cells of Oxyria digyna contain a dense

array of cortical MTs (Figs. 3 a – e). In palisade parenchyma

cells, the cortical MTs appear to be arranged in a net-like pat-

tern (Fig. 3 a). In epidermal cells, vast networks of cortical

MTs were observed (Fig. 3 b). MTs showed no preferential ori-

entation, and their lengths appeared to be quite variable. In

spongy parenchyma cells, MT arrays formed apparent focal

points, which appeared as areas with bright fluorescence

(Fig. 3 c). MTs were predominantly found in the cell cortex,

and although merged images of fluorescently labelled MTs

(green) and chlorophyll autofluorescence (red) demonstrated

that MTs are often in close proximity to chloroplasts, there

was no clear MT pattern to suggest a direct association with

chloroplast distribution (Fig. 3 d). Instead, the dense cortical

MT arrays extended far beyond the location of chloroplasts

(Fig. 3 e).



Microtubule disruption does not alter chloroplast protrusions

To investigate whether MTs might play a role in regulating the

formation and activity of chloroplast protrusions, leaves were

treated with the MT depolymerizing agent, oryzalin. A 10-μM

concentration of oryzalin depolymerized all MTs in mesophyll

cells (Fig. 3 f). Examining live cells under DIC revealed that

treatment with 10 μM oryzalin did not abolish chloroplast pro-

trusions or their interactions with smaller organelles (Fig. 4 a).

In specimens prepared for TEM, chloroplast protrusions were

still evident after treatments with 10 μM oryzalin for 2 h

(Figs. 4 b – f). Invaginations in the stroma-filled parts were fre-

quently observed (Figs. 4 c, d). Cytoplasmic organization did

not appear to be altered upon treatment with oryzalin and

close contact of chloroplasts with other organelles, like mito-

chondria, continued (Figs. 4 b, f). ER tubules, however, were

sometimes observed in close vicinity to the chloroplast protru-

sions (Fig. 4 e) or the organelle contact area (Fig. 4 f).

Latrunculin B treatment affects cytoplasmic integrity, but

does not prevent chloroplast protrusion formation. Treatment

with 5 μM or 10 μM latrunculin B arrested cytoplasmic stream-

ing. Chloroplasts became spherical and protrusions were

hardly visible. Numerous spherical structures became visible

around the chloroplasts (Fig. 5 a). Transmission electron mi-

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

A. Holzinger, G. O. Wasteneys, and C. Lütz

402


crographs confirmed changes in cytoplasmic organization of

mesophyll cells when leaf sections were treated with 5 μM

(Figs. 5 b – d) or 10 μM (Fig. 5 e) latrunculin B. For example, ER

accumulations were found in the vicinity of the nucleus

(Fig. 5 b) and disconnected membranes and unusual mem-

brane vesicles were sometimes observed (Fig. 5 c). Neverthe-

less, massive thylakoid-free chloroplast protrusions were still

frequently present (Figs. 5 c – e), located mostly at the concave

sides of the chloroplasts (Fig. 5 e). After latrunculin B treat-

ments, the thylakoid-free chloroplast protrusions still con-

tained invaginations, where organelles like mitochondria re-

mained in close contact with the chloroplast surface (Fig. 5 d).



Fig. 1

Comparative anatomy of alpine and arctic Oxyria digyna leaves.

(a, b) Toluidine blue-stained semithin sections observed with the light

microscope. Sample collected in Svalbard; sample collected in the

Austrian Alps. Note the substantial difference in leaf thickness be-

tween the two sampling sites. Especially the palisade parenchyma

(pp) and the spongy parenchyma (sp) differ in size. The epidermis

(ep) has significantly different cell sizes on the adaxial (top) and abaxial

(bottom) sides; on the abaxial sides secretory trichomes (arrow) and

stomatal guard cells are found. (c, d) 4-week-old cultivated leaf ob-

served by cryo SEM. Cross fracture exhibiting the bifacial arrange-

ment; abaxial epidermis, stomata (st), and secretory trichomes (ar-

rows). Bars: 100 μm.

Cytoskeleton-Independent Chloroplast Protrusions

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

403


Fig. 2

Leaves of Oxyria digyna control samples from different habi-

tats. DIC image of mesophyll cell from a cultivated plant containing

a large number of chloroplast protrusions (arrows). (b – g) Details of

the ultrastructure of samples collected in the Austrian Alps (b, c, f, g)

and Svalbard (d, e). Dictyosome (arrow) in invagination of the nu-

cleus (N), mitochondrion (M); tangential section of leaf mesophyll

cell, chloroplast containing starch grains (S), transversely sectioned

chloroplast with broad stroma portion (str), mitochondrion (M), micro-

body (MB); mitochondrion (M) almost covered by a chloroplast pro-

trusion; chloroplast protrusion (arrow) in close contact with mito-

chondrion (M) in the vicinity of the cell wall (CW); stroma (str)-filled

chloroplast protrusions; mesophyll cell in close vicinity to vascular tis-

sue containing oxalate crystal (arrow) in the vacuole (V). Bars: 5 μm,



b – g 1 μm.

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

A. Holzinger, G. O. Wasteneys, and C. Lütz

404


Fig. 3

Microtubule arrangement in cultivated Oxyria digyna leaves.



Palisade parenchyma cell with dense, net-like arrangement of corti-

cal microtubules. Epidermal cells with dense cortical arrays of micro-

tubules. Spongy parenchyma cell with net-like arrangement of corti-

cal microtubules, and apparent focal points with very bright staining

(arrows). Merged chlorophyll autofluorescence (red) representing

chloroplasts (Chl) and microtubules (green) in a mesophyll cell. High-

er magnification of dense microtubules in mesophyll cells. Mesophyll

cell treated for 2 h with 10 μM oryzalin showing destruction of micro-

tubules. Only diffuse fluorescence remains (arrows). Bars: 20 μm.

Cytoskeleton-Independent Chloroplast Protrusions

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

405


Fig. 4

Effects of treatment with 10 μM oryzalin for 2 h on mesophyll

cells of cultivated Oxyria digyna plants. DIC image exhibiting chlo-

roplast protrusions (arrows), some have close contact to smaller or-

ganelles. (b – f) Details of the ultrastructure. Chloroplast protrusion

containing stroma (str) in close vicinity to mitochondrion (M); chlo-

roplasts with large areas exclusively containing stroma (str) and an in-

vagination in this area (arrow); tangentially sectioned chloroplasts

with chloroplast protrusions and invaginations (arrows); ER cisternae

(arrows) next to chloroplast with protrusion; vicinity of chloroplast

protrusion containing stroma (str), ER (arrow), and mitochondrion (M).

Bars: 5 μm, b – f 1 μm.

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

A. Holzinger, G. O. Wasteneys, and C. Lütz



406

Discussion

Our investigations compared leaves, from the gross anatomical

to the ultrastructural level, in the arctic-alpine species Oxyria

digyna collected from different habitats. In all samples, mas-

sive chloroplast protrusions containing only stromal material

and free of thylakoid membranes were observed. Chloroplast

protrusions similar to those found in plants collected in the

field were identified in cultivated samples. In this study, we

explored the possible involvement of cytoskeletal elements in

the regulation of chloroplast protrusion formation and be-

haviour. Our results suggest that MTs, and possibly MFs, are

not directly involved in the formation of these structures.

Several reports have described the ability of plastids to form

stroma-containing compartments (for a summary see Gray et

al., 2001). Recently, the term stromule (Köhler and Hanson,

2000) has been used to describe tubular projections emerging

from plastids. These stromules are highly dynamic as they

grow and retract from chloroplasts along MF tracks (Kwok

and Hanson, 2004 b; Gunning, 2005). Also, MTs have been

found to be crucial for their formation (Kwok and Hanson,

2003). Stromules have been defined as being up to 800 nm

wide, and may reach a length of several tens of micrometers

(for a summary see Kwok and Hanson, 2004 a). The structures

presented herein are likely to be distinct from stromules on

account of their size and their MT-independent formation and

behaviour. Instead, these protrusions are most likely analo-

Fig. 5

Effects of treatment with 5 μM (b – d) or 10 μM (a, e) latruncu-

lin B on mesophyll cells of cultivated Oxyria digyna plants. DIC image.

No cytoplasmic streaming is detected, chloroplasts appear spherical

and numerous small, spherical organelles (arrows) are present. (b – e)

Details of the ultrastructure. Nucleus (N) and massive amount of ER;



disconnected membranes and unusual membrane vesicles (

∗), chlo-

roplast with protrusion and invagination (arrow); mitochondrion (M)

in chloroplast invagination, surrounded by area exclusively containing

stroma (str); chloroplast with stroma (str) containing protrusion in

vicinity of the nucleus (N). Bars: 5 μm, b – e 1 μm.

Cytoskeleton-Independent Chloroplast Protrusions

Plant Biology 9 (2007)



407

gous to the chloroplast “proliferations” described in the high

alpine plant Ranunculus glacialis (Lütz, 1987; Lütz and Moser,

1977; Larcher et al., 1997). A distinction between stromules

and chloroplast protrusions is given by the establishment of

a “shape index”, a ratio between length and radius of these

structures in Arabidopsis thaliana (Holzinger et al., 2006).

Speculations on the function of stromules and chloroplast pro-

trusions exist. Most point towards the increased surface to

volume ratio of chloroplasts in response to physiological de-

mands. One possibility is that the formation of chloroplast

protrusions would increase RUBISCO concentrations and chlo-

roplast ribosome levels. RUBISCO, whose regulation by activity

levels is likely more important than concentration, has never

been found to be a limiting factor for photosynthesis in Oxyria



digyna, according to standard activity estimations (Chabot et

al., 1972). A more likely advantage is that chloroplast protru-

sions establish close contact with other organelles. This can

also be concluded from the present study, in which mitochon-

dria were frequently found in the invaginations of chloro-

plasts, thus being in close contact to the stroma-rich areas.

However, we were unable to document membrane fusion

events.


It remains unclear which processes induce the formation of

these chloroplast protrusions in Oxyria digyna. Using immuno-

fluorescence microscopy, we observed a dense network of cor-

tical MTs in mesophyll cells, and showed that this network was

effectively destroyed by the anti-MT drug oryzalin. Although

MTs were found in the vicinity of chloroplasts, we detected

no direct interactions between MTs and the chloroplast pro-

trusions. MT disruption also failed to abolish chloroplast pro-

trusions. Kandasamy and Meagher (1999) similarly concluded

that MTs did not influence the position or movement of chlo-

roplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells. The finding that

chloroplast protrusions in Oxyria digyna are not disrupted

when MTs are depolymerized, however, is particularly impor-

tant because MTs have been described as being a critical factor

in the establishment of stromules in Nicotiana tabacum (Kwok

and Hanson, 2003). Our analysis indicates that stromule for-

mation and the development of the more massive chloroplast

protrusions in Oxyria digyna are likely to be controlled by dis-

tinct mechanisms.

Our study also failed to demonstrate any clear function for MFs

in the occurrence of chloroplast protrusions. Treatment with

latrunculin B, a potent disruptor of MFs (Spector et al., 1989),

at concentrations sufficient to fully destroy the MF system (cf.

Kandasamy and Meagher, 1999) failed to abolish the occur-

rence of stroma-filled chloroplast areas interacting with other

organelles. This treatment, however, did cause severe changes

to the cytoplasmic integrity, so some role for MFs in the es-

tablishment of chloroplast protrusions cannot be ruled out.

Latrunculin B arrested cytoplasmic streaming and altered cy-

toplasmic integrity, including the generation of membrane

anomalies and massive ER accumulation. The latter can be re-

garded as a general defence mechanism, also observed upon

applying various MF-disrupting agents (e.g., Holzinger and

Meindl, 1997; Holzinger and Lütz-Meindl, 2001). Despite the

clear signs of MF disruption and DIC observations that protru-

sions were totally lost, thylakoid-free areas of the chloroplasts

were clearly detected at the TEM level. These areas, however,

were mainly at the concave side of the chloroplast, suggesting

that expansion of chloroplast protrusions may depend on an

intact MF cytoskeleton, as suggested for stromules (Kwok and

Hanson, 2004 b; Gunning, 2005). However, in Oxyria digyna

the proportion of thylakoid-free stroma area in chloroplasts

remained constant after MF disruption when compared to the

controls. Thus, the destruction of MFs may influence the shape

of chloroplast protrusions, but not their occurrence. This find-

ing accords with observations in Nicotiana tabacum, where dif-

ferent MF inhibitors were found to alter chloroplast stromules

in a way that they became shorter and thicker (Kwok and Han-

son, 2003). In a study employing GFP-hTalin to visualize MFs,

a close correlation of MFs with stromules was observed in Ara-



bidopsis thaliana (Kwok and Hanson, 2004 b). However, this

would suggest that MFs are responsible for establishing the

narrow stromules, but are not causally involved in the occur-

rence of thylakoid-free stroma-filled areas in chloroplasts seen

in our study. While it would be interesting to visualize the MF

cytoskeleton in Oxyria digyna, only thick MF bundles are ob-

served after phalloidin staining (not shown). If there is a mesh-

work of individual MFs surrounding chloroplasts, GFP-talin

would be better for revealing it. However, it has not yet been

possible to introduce GFP-talin constructs into Oxyria digyna.

The close spatial contacts between chloroplasts and organelles

like mitochondria are retained in the presence of latrunculin B,

which confirms that these processes are also not dependent on

an intact MF cytoskeleton.

What then can explain the formation and activity of chloro-

plast protrusions? A highly active chloroplast “mobile jacket”

has been described in isolated tobacco and spinach chloro-

plasts (Spencer and Wildman, 1964; Spencer and Unt, 1965),

suggesting that an intrinsic mechanism for chloroplast flexi-

bility exists. It has also been claimed that osmotic phenomena

in salt- or water-stressed plants are responsible for “amoe-

boid” plastids (Huang and Steveninck, 1990) or the develop-

ment of chloroplast extensions (Freeman and Duysen, 1975).

The structures described by these authors are very similar in

appearance to the chloroplast protrusions found in our study.

The detection of chloroplast protrusions in the Antarctic spe-

cies Deschampsia antarctica (Gielwanowska and Szczuka,

2005) was recently confirmed and extended to a second Ant-

arctic phanerogam, Colobanthus quitensis (Lütz et al., 2006).

This points to chloroplast protrusions being an adaptation to

special environmental conditions. Recent observations have

demonstrated that temperature might be a critical factor in

chloroplast protrusion formation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Hol-

zinger et al., 2006) and alpine plants (Buchner et al., 2007).

Chloroplast swelling, and the appearance of thylakoid-free

areas, have been described in association with chilling effects

(C

ˇ iamporová and Trginová, 1999). MTs, in turn, are cold-sensi-



tive, at least when sudden drops in temperature occur (Nick,

2000). Some indirect signalling mechanisms upon MT disrup-

tion may be responsible for cold-induced chloroplast swelling.

The significant difference in leaf thickness between samples

collected from Svalbard and the Austrian Alps is an interesting

observation but difficult to interpret. It could be related to the

24 h daylight situation Oxyria digyna plants have to face in

Svalbard. Distinct ecotypes of Oxyria digyna with substantial

anatomical differences have been described (Billings et al.,

1961, 1971; Heide, 2005). For a detailed understanding of this

observation, extended studies will need to be performed.

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

A. Holzinger, G. O. Wasteneys, and C. Lütz

408


In addition to leaf thickness variations, metabolic (Billings et

al., 1971) and structural (Pyankov and Vaskorskii, 1994; Koro-

leva, 1996) adaptations of the photosynthetic apparatus to arc-

tic and alpine conditions have been described for the different

ecotypes of Oxyria digyna. In particular, rearrangements of

grana in Oxyria digyna chloroplasts have been detected (Miro-

slavov et al., 1996). Our study extends these findings to the ob-

servation of thylakoid-free, stroma-filled chloroplast protru-

sions (Lütz and Engel, 2007) with close associations to other

organelles. These protrusions are likely to be an additional

adaptation to harsh environments. In future, a detailed inves-

tigation of temperature and light conditions that favour the

occurrence of chloroplast protrusions may elucidate their role

in plant adaptation to challenging environmental conditions.



Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the EU Large-Scale Facility for Arctic

Environmental Research, Norwegian Polar Board, Longyearby-

en for financial support and Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) for

their cooperation in Ny Alesund, Svalbard. Technical assistance

in TEM section preparation by L. Di Piazza and B. Defregger is

acknowledged. We thank S. Marcante and Prof. Dr. J. Wagner

for help in seed collection in the Austrian Alps. TEM observa-

tions were performed in the Department of Zoology at the Uni-

versity of Innsbruck, Prof. Dr. R. Rieger is to be acknowledged

for providing access to this instrument. We would also like to

thank E. Kawamura for practical instructions in the MT stain-

ing procedure and the UBC Bioimaging Facility of the Univer-

sity of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC for access to the cryo

SEM and confocal microscope. The scientific visit to Vancouver,

BC was supported by a “Habilitation” stipend from the LFU

Innsbruck (Dept. for Academic Mobility) to A. H. The study

has been supported by a FWF (Austrian Science Foundation)

grant P 17184 to C. L. and an NSERC Discovery grant 298264-

04 to G. O. W.



References

Billings, W. D., Clebsch, E. E. C., and Mooney, H. A. (1961) Effect of low

concentrations of carbon dioxide on photosynthesis rates of two

races of Oxyria. Science 133, 1834.

Billings, W. D., Godfrey, P. J., Chabot, B. F., and Bourque, D. P. (1971)

Metabolic acclimation to temperature in arctic and alpine eco-

types of Oxyria digyna. Arctic and Alpine Research 3, 277 – 289.

Bornkamm, R. (1969) Types of oxalate metabolism in green leaves in

related families of higher plants. Flora, Abteilung A: Physiologie

und Biochemie 160, 317 – 336.

Buchner, O., Lütz, C., and Holzinger, A. (2007) Design and construc-

tion of a new temperature controlled chamber for light- and con-

focal microscopy under monitored conditions: biological applica-

tion for plant samples. Journal of Microscopy, in press.

Chabot, B. F., Chabot, J. F., and Billings, W. D. (1972) Ribulose-1,5-di-

phosphate carboxylase activity in arctic and alpine populations of



Oxyria digyna. Photosynthetica 6, 364 – 369.

Chrtek, J. and Sourkova, M. (1992) Variation in Oxyria digyna. Preslia

(Prague) 64, 207 – 210.

C

ˇ iamporová, M. and Trginová, I. (1999) Modifications of plant cell



ultrastructure accompanying metabolic responses to low temper-

atures. Biologia (Bratislava) 54, 349 – 360.

Engel, L., Fock, H., and Scharrenberger, C. (1986 a) CO

2

and H



2

O gas


exchange of the high alpine plant Oxyria digyna (L.) Hill. 1. Irradi-

ance and temperature dependence. Photosynthetica 20, 293 – 303.

Engel, L., Fock, H., and Scharrenberger, C. (1986 b) CO

2

and H



2

O gas


exchange of the high alpine plant Oxyria digyna (L.) Hill. 2. Re-

sponse to high irradiance stress and supraoptimal leaf tempera-

tures. Photosynthetica 20, 304 – 314.

Freeman, T. P. and Duysen, M. E. (1975) The effect of imposed water

stress on the development and ultra structure of wheat chloro-

plasts. Protoplasma 83, 131 – 145.

Gerasimenko, T. V., Korolyova, O. Y., Filatova, N. I., Popova, I. A., and

Kaipianinen, E. L. (1993) Photosynthetic pigments and CO

2

ex-


change in plants of high arctic tundra. Photosynthetica 28, 75 – 81.

Gielwanowska, I. and Szczuka, E. (2005) New ultrastructural features

of organelles in leaf cells of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. Polar Bi-

ology 28, 951 – 955.

Gray, J. C., Sullivan, J. A., Hibberd, J. M., and Hanson, M. R. (2001) Stro-

mules: mobile protrusions and interconnections between plastids.

Plant Biology 3, 223 – 233.

Gunning, B. E. S. (2005) Plastid stromules: video microscopy of their

outgrowth, retraction, tensioning, anchoring, branching, bridging,

and tip-shedding. Protoplasma 225, 33 – 42.

Heide, O. M. (2005) Ecotypic variation among European arctic and al-

pine populations of Oxyria digyna. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Re-

search 37, 233 – 238.

Holzinger, A. and Meindl, U. (1997) Jasplakinolide, a novel actin tar-

geting peptide, inhibits cell growth and induces actin filament

polymerization in the green alga Micrasterias. Cell Motility and

the Cytoskeleton 38, 365 – 372.

Holzinger, A. and Lütz-Meindl, U. (2001) Chondramides, novel cyclo-

depsipeptides from myxobacteria, influence cell development and

induce actin filament polymerization in the green alga Micraste-



rias. Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton 48, 87 – 95.

Holzinger, A., Buchner, O., Lütz, C., and Hanson, M. R. (2006) Temper-

ature-sensitive formation of chloroplast protrusions and stro-

mules in leaf mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Protoplasma,

in press.

Huang, C. X. and Steveninck, R. F. M. (1990) Salinity induced structur-

al changes in meristematic cells of barley roots. New Phytologist

115, 17 – 22.

Kandasamy, M. K. and Meagher, R. B. (1999) Actin-organelle interac-

tion: association with chloroplast in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll

cells. Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton 44, 110 – 118.

Köhler, R. H. and Hanson, M. R. (2000) Plastid tubules of higher

plants are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Journal

of Cell Science 113, 81 – 89.

Körner, C. (2003) Alpine Plant Life: Functional Plant Ecology of High

Mountain Ecosystems. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Verlag, pp. 350.

Körner, C., Neumayr, M., Menendez-Riedl, S. P., and Smeets-Scheel, A.

(1989) Functional morphology of mountain plants. Flora 182,

353 – 383.

Koroleva, O. Y. (1996) Adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus of

an arctic species Oxyria digyna to low temperatures. Fiziologiya

Rastenii (Moscow) 43, 367 – 373.

Koroleva, O. Y., Brueggemann, W., and Krause, G. H. (1994) Photo-

inhibition, xanthophyll cycle and in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence

quenching of chilling-tolerant Oxyria digyna and chilling-sensitive

Zea mays. Physiologia Plantarum 92, 577 – 584.

Kurets, V. K., Popov, E., Drozdov, S. N., and Sysoeva, M. I. (2002) Tem-

perature characteristics of net photoysnthesis in Oxyria digyna

(Polygonaceae). Botanicheskii Zhurnal 87, 110 – 114.

Kwok, E. Y. and Hanson, M. R. (2003) Microfilaments and microtu-

bules control the morphology and movement of non-green plas-

tids and stromules in Nicotiana tabacum. The Plant Journal 35,

16 – 26.


Kwok, E. Y. and Hanson, M. R. (2004 a) Stromules and the dynamic

nature of plastid morphology. Journal of Microscopy 214, 124 – 137.

Kwok, E. Y. and Hanson, M. R. (2004 b) In vivo analysis of interactions

between GFP-labeled microfilaments and plastid stromules. BMC

Plant Biology 10, 2.

Cytoskeleton-Independent Chloroplast Protrusions

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

409


Larcher, W., Wagner, J., and Lütz, C. (1997) Effect of heat on photosyn-

thesis, dark respiration and cellular ultrastructure of the arctic-al-

pine psychrophyte Ranunculus glacialis. Photosynthetica 34, 219 –

232.


Lütz, C. (1987) Cytology of high alpine plants. II. Microbody activity

in leaves of Ranunculus glacialis L. Cytologia 52, 679 – 686.

Lütz, C. and Engel, L. (2007) Changes in chloroplast ultrastructure in

some high alpine plants: adaptation to metabolic demands and

climate? Protoplasma, in press.

Lütz, C. and Gülz, P.-G. (1985) Comparative analysis of epicuticular

waxes from some high alpine plant species. Zeitschrift für Natur-

forschung 40c, 599 – 605.

Lütz, C. and Holzinger, A. (2004) A comparative analysis of photosyn-

thetic pigments and tocopherol of some arctic-alpine plants from

the Kongsfjorden area, Spitsbergen, Norway. Reports on Polar and

Marine Research 492, 114 – 122.

Lütz, C. and Moser, W. (1977) On the cytology of high alpine plants.

I. The ultrastructure of Ranunculus glacialis L. Flora 166, 21 – 34.

Lütz C, Blassnigg, M., Di Piazza, L., and Remias, D. (2006) Deschamp-

sia antarctica and Colobanthus quetensis from Antarctica: a phys-

iological and ultrastructural comparison. FESPB Congress, Lyon,

RAS03-015.

Miroslavov, E. A., Voznesenskaya, E. V., and Bubolo, L. S. (1996) Chlo-

roplast structure in northern plants in relation to chloroplast

adaptation to arctic conditions. Russian Journal of Plant Physiolo-

gy 43, 325 – 330.

Mooney, H. A. and Billings, W. D. (1961) Comparative physiological

ecology of arctic and alpine populations of Oxyria digyna. Ecologi-

cal Monographs 31, 1 – 29.

Nick, P. (2000) Control of the response to low temperatures. In Plant

Microtubules – Potential for Biotechnology (Nick, P., ed.), Berlin:

Springer-Verlag, pp.121 – 135.

Pyankov, V. L. and Vaskorskii, M. D. (1994) Temperature adaptation of

the photosynthetic system of Oxyria digyna and Alopecurus alpi-

nus, plants of the Arctic Tundra from Wrangel Island. Fiziologiya

Rastenii (Moscow) 41, 517 – 525.

Semikhatova, O. A., Leina, G. D., Yudian, O. S., and Ivanova, T. I. (1985)

Effect of high temperature on dark gas exchange of leaves. Botani-

cheskii Zhurnal 70, 814 – 824.

Spector, I., Shochert, N. R., Blasberger, D., and Kashman, Y. (1989) La-

trunculins – novel marine macrolides that disrupt microfilament

organization and affect cell growth. I. Comparison with cytochala-

sin D. Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton 13, 127 – 144.

Spencer, D. and Unt, H. (1965) Biochemical and structural correla-

tions in isolated spinach chloroplasts under isotonic and hypoton-

ic conditions. Australian Journal of Biological Sciences 18, 197 –

210.

Spencer, D. and Wildman, S. G. (1964) The incorporation of amino



acids into protein by cell-free extracts from tobacco leaves. Bio-

chemistry 3, 954 – 959.

Tolvanen, A. and Henry, G. H. R. (2001) Responses of carbon and ni-

trogen concentrations in high arctic plants to experimental in-

creased temperature. Canadian Journal of Botany 79, 711 – 718.

Wasteneys, G. O., Willingale-Theune, J., and Menzel, D. (1997) Freeze

shattering: a simple and effective method for permeabilizing

higher plant cell walls. Journal of Microscopy 188, 51 – 61.

Zhou, Y., Zhang, G.-L., Li, B.-G., and Chen, Y.-Z. (2001) Three new com-

pounds from Oxyria digyna (L.) Hill. Indian Journal of Chemistry,

Section B: Organic Chemistry 40, 1219 – 1222.

A. Holzinger

Department of Physiology and Cell Physiology of Alpine Plants

Institute of Botany

University of Innsbruck

Sternwartestraße 15

6020 Innsbruck

Austria


E-mail: andreas.holzinger@uibk.ac.at

Editor: S. M. Wick

Plant Biology 9 (2007)

A. Holzinger, G. O. Wasteneys, and C. Lütz



410


Yüklə 1,23 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə