Acylated anthocyanins from leaves of Oxalis triangularis Torgils Fossen



Yüklə 141,64 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.07.2017
ölçüsü141,64 Kb.

Acylated anthocyanins from leaves of Oxalis triangularis

Torgils Fossen

a,*

, Saleh Rayyan



a

, Maya H. Holmberg

a

,

Ha˚vard S. Nateland



b

, Øyvind M. Andersen

a

a

Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Alle´gt. 41, N-5007 Bergen, Norway



b

Polyphenols Laboratories AS, Hanaveien 4-6, N-4327 Sandnes, Norway

Received 8 November 2004; received in revised form 6 April 2005

Abstract


The novel anthocyanins, malvidin 3-O-(6-O-(4-O-malonyl-a-rhamnopyranosyl)-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside (2),

malvidin 3-O-(6-O-a-rhamnopyranosyl-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-(6-O-malonyl-b-glucopyranoside) (3), malvidin 3-O-(6-O-(4-O-

malonyl-a-rhamnopyranosyl)-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-(6-O-malonyl-b-glucopyranoside) (4), malvidin 3-O-(6-O-(4-O-malonyl-a-

rhamnopyranosyl)-b-glucopyranoside) (5) and malvidin 3-O-(6-O-(Z)-p-coumaroyl-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside

(6), in addition to the 3-O-(6-O-a-rhamnopyranosyl-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside (1) and the 3-O-(6-O-(E)-p-couma-

royl-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside (7) of malvidin have been isolated from purple leaves of Oxalis triangularis A. St.

-Hil. In pigments 2, 4 and 5 a malonyl unit is linked to the rhamnose 4-position, which has not been reported previously for any

anthocyanin before. The identifications were mainly based on 2D NMR spectroscopy and electrospray MS.

Ó 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Oxalis triangularis; Purple shamrock; Leaves; Colour; Acylated anthocyanins; 4-Malonylated rhamnose; 2D NMR

1. Introduction

Oxalis triangularis A. St.-Hil. (purple shamrock or

purple clover) in Oxalidaceae is an edible perennial

plant, which is easily cultivated. The leaves are especially

appreciated because of their sour and exotic taste. The

plant has intensely purple leaves with a monomeric

anthocyanin content of 195 mg/100 g on malvidin-3,

5-diglucoside basis, which make them a potential source

for natural colorants (

Pazmin˜o-Dura´n et al., 2001

). The

anthocyanin content in the leaves of non-transformed



plants has been shown to be about 40% higher than in

transformed plants regenerated from hairy roots in-

duced by A. rhizogenes LBA 9402 (

Wielanek et al.,

2004

). Three major anthocyanins have previously been



isolated from the leaves (

Pazmin˜o-Dura´n et al., 2001

).

All of them shared the same basic structure, malvidin-



3-rutinoside-5-glucoside. Two of these pigments were

shown to be acylated with one and two molecules of

malonic acid, respectively, however, the substitution

positions of the acyl moieties were not determined (

Paz-

min˜o-Dura´n et al., 2001



). From other species in Oxalid-

aceae, cyanidin 3-glucoside has been found as the main

pigment in callus cultures of O. reclinata Jacq (

Crouch


et al., 1993

), and in Averrhoa bilimbi and A. carambola

(

Gunasegaran, 1992



). The latter species contained

also cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside. More recently, malvidin

3-acetylglucoside-5-glucoside in addition to the 3,5-

diglucosides of peonidin, petunidin and malvidin, and

the 3-glucosides of peonidin, delphinidin, petunidin

and malvidin have been found in colored tubers of

Oca (O. tuberosa Mol.) var. Isla Oca (

Alcalde-Eon

et al., 2004

). The objective of the present study was to

isolate and determine the complete structures of the

anthocyanins from leaves of O. triangularis, including

five novel pigments (

Fig. 1


).

0031-9422/$ - see front matter

Ó 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

doi:10.1016/j.phytochem.2005.04.009

*

Corresponding author. Tel.: +47 55 58 82 44; fax: +47 55 58 94 90.



E-mail address:

Torgils.Fossen@kj.uib.no

(T. Fossen).

www.elsevier.com/locate/phytochem

Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140

PHYTOCHEMISTRY



2. Results and discussion

The aqueous concentrate of the acidified methanolic

extract of leaves of O. triangularis, was purified by par-

tition against ethyl acetate followed by Amberlite XAD-

7 column chromatography. The anthocyanins in the

purified extract were fractionated by Sephadex LH-20

column chromatography. Individual pigments, 1–7,

were separated by preparative HPLC.

2.1. Identification

The HPLC profile of the acidified methanolic crude

extract of leaves of O. triangularis showed two major

and several minor anthocyanins (

Fig. 2

). Pigment 1



was identified as the known pigment malvidin 3-O-

(6

II



-O-a-rhamnopyranosyl-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-

glucopyranoside by NMR, UV–Vis spectroscopy and

electrospray MS (

Tables 1–3

). 1 has previously been

identified in O. triangularis (

Pazmin˜o-Dura´n et al., 2001

).

The aromatic region of the 1D



1

H NMR spectrum of

2 showed a 1H singlet at d 9.05 (H-4), a 2H singlet at d

8.07 (H-2

I

/6

I



) and an AX system at d 7.21 (d, 1.8 Hz; H-

8) and d 7.11 (d, 1.8 Hz; H-6), revealing an anthocyanin

having a symmetrically substituted B-ring. The 6H sin-

glet at d 4.09 (OCH

3

) confirmed the identity of the agly-



cone of 2 to be malvidin. The 14

13

C resonances



belonging to the aglycone in the 1D

13

C CAPT spectrum



of 2 were assigned by the observed crosspeaks in the

HMBC spectrum (

Fig. 3

). The sugar regions of the 1D



1

H and 1D


13

C CAPT spectra of 2 showed the presence

of two glucose units and one rhamnose unit (

Tables 2


and 3

). All the

1

H sugar resonances were assigned by



the DQF-COSY and the TOCSY experiments, and the

corresponding

13

C resonances were then assigned by



the

1

H–



13

C HSQC experiment. The anomeric coupling

constants (7.9, 7.9 and 1.5 Hz, respectively) and the 18

13

C resonances in the sugar region of the



13

C CAPT


spectrum of 2 were in accordance with two b-glucopyr-

anose units and one rhamnose unit (

Fossen and Ander-

sen, 2000

). The downfield shift of H-4

IV

(d 4.93)



belonging to the rhamnose unit indicated the presence

of acyl substitution. The acyl moiety was identified as

malonic acid by the 2H singlet at d 3.44 (H-2 malonyl)

in the 1D

1

H spectrum and the three signals at d



168.36 (C-1 malonyl), d 170.29 (C-3 malonyl) and d

41.97 (C-2 malonyl) in the 1D

13

C CAPT spectrum.



The linkages between the aglycone, sugar units and the

malonyl were determined by the long-range correlations

in the 2D HMBC spectrum (

Fig. 3


). A molecular ion at

m/z 887 in the ESI-MS spectrum of 2 corresponded to

malvidin

malonyl-rhamnosyl-glucosyl-glucoside

and

the fragment ions at m/z 655, m/z 493 and m/z 331 cor-



responded to malvidin diglucoside (loss of terminal mal-

onylated rhamnosyl), malvidin glucoside and malvidin

aglycone, respectively. A molecular ion at m/z 887.249

in the high resolution ESI-MS spectrum, which was in

accordance with the molecular formula C

38

H



47

O

24



,

confirmed the identity of 2 to be the novel anthocyanin

malvidin 3-O-(6

II

-O-(4



IV

-O-malonyl-a-rhamnopyrano-

syl)-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside (

Fig. 1


).

The NMR resonances of pigment 3 shared many sim-

ilarities with the corresponding resonances of 2 (

Tables


2 and 3

), in accordance with malvidin 3-rutinoside-5-



O

OH

HO

OH

O

O

HO

OH

OCH

3

OCH

3

O

HO

O

OR

1

OH

HO

O

H

3

C

OH

O

OH

R

2

O

1: H

2: H

3: malonyl 

4: malonyl

5: ----

R

1               

R

2

H

malonyl



H

malonyl


malonyl

2

I

6

I

6

II

4

IV

1

III

1

IV

1

II

1–4

5

O

OH

HO

OH

O

O

HO

OH

OCH

3

OCH

3

O

HO

O

OH

OH

HO

O

2

I

6

I

6

II

1

III

1

II

6

HO

O

Fig. 1. Structures of the novel anthocyanins 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 and the known pigment 1 isolated from purple leaves of Oxalis triangularis A. St.-Hil.

Compound 7 is similar to compound 6, but the acyl moiety has an E-configuration.

1134


T. Fossen et al. / Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140

glucoside acylated with malonic acid. However, the

chemical shift values of H-6A

III

(d 4.66), H-6B



III

(d

4.51) and C-6A



III

(d 65.44) of 3 occurred significantly

downfield, and the chemical shift value of H-4

IV

(d



3.36)

occurred


significantly

upfield,


respectively,

compared to the analogous chemical shift values of 2,

indicating that 3 is acylated with malonic acid at the

6-hydroxyl of the 5-glucosyl unit. The crosspeaks at d

4.66/168.7 (H-6A

III


/C-1 malonyl) and d 4.51/168.7 (H-

6B

III



/C-1 malonyl) in the HMBC-spectrum confirmed

the linkage between the malonyl and the 5-glucose to

be at the 6

III


-hydroxyl. A molecular ion at m/z 887 in

the ESI-MS spectrum of 3 corresponded to malvidin

malonyl-rhamnosyl-glucosyl-glucoside and the fragment

ions at m/z 639, m/z 579 and m/z 331 corresponded to

malvidin rhamnosyl-glucoside (loss of malonylated glu-

cosyl), malvidin malonyl-glucoside and malvidin agly-

cone, respectively. A molecular ion at m/z 887.249 in

the high resolution ESI-MS spectrum, which was in

accordance with the molecular formula C

38

H



47

O

24



,

confirmed the identity of 3 to be the novel anthocyanin

malvidin

3-O-(6


II

-O-a-rhamnopyranosyl-b-glucopyr-

anoside)-5-O-(6

III


-O-malonyl-b-glucopyranoside) (

Fig. 1


).

Similarly, the NMR spectra of 4 resembled those of 2

and 3 (

Tables 2 and 3



), in accordance with malvidin 3-

rutinoside-5-glucoside acylated with two units of malo-

nic acid. The downfield chemical shift values of H-6A

III


(d 4.65), H-6B

III


(d 4.47), C-6A

III


(d 65.34) and H-4

IV

(d



4.94) indicated the substitution positions of the malonyl

units to be at the 5-glucosyl 6

III

-hydroxyl and the



rhamnosyl 4

IV

-hydroxyl, respectively. The crosspeaks



at d 4.65/168.5 (H-6A

III


/C-1 malonyl), d 4.47/168.5 (H-

6B

III



/C-1 malonyl) and d 4.94/168.0 (H-4

IV

/C-1 malonyl)



in the HMBC-spectrum confirmed this substitution

pattern. A molecular ion at m/z 973 in the ESI-MS spec-

trum of 4 corresponded to malvidin dimalonyl-rhamno-

syl-glucosyl-glucoside, and the fragment ions at m/z 887,

m/z 579 and m/z 331 corresponded to malvidin malonyl-

rhamnosyl-glucosyl-glucoside, malvidin malonyl-gluco-

side and malvidin aglycone, respectively. A molecular

ion at m/z 973.247 in the high resolution ESI-MS

spectrum, which was in accordance with the molecular

Table 1


Chromatographic (HPLC) and spectral (UV–Vis and MS) data recorded for 1–7

Compound


On-line HPLC

ESI-MS


Relative

proportions

(%)

*

Vis



max

(nm)


Local UV

max


(nm)

A

440



/A

vis-max


(%)

A

320



/A

vis-max


(%)

A

UV-max



/A

vis-max


(%)

t

R



(min)

M

+



m/z

M

+



m/z calculated

1

54



530

278


14

13

104



15.63

801.245


801.224

2

31



533

278


11

10

87



16.42

887.249


887.246

3

3



532

278


13

14

110



17.81

887.249


887.246

4

3



536

278


11

11

94



18.34

973.247


973.246

5



**

534


280

24

6



62

21.9


725

a

725



a

6

2



538

280


14

51

97



22.88

801.225


801.224

7

3



535

284


13

172


220

25.19


801

a

801



a

M

+



= molecular ion.

a

Low-resolution MS.



*

Unknown pigments: 2%.

**

<2%.

Fig. 2. HPLC chromatogram of anthocyanins from purple leaves of Oxalis triangularis A. St.-Hil. detected at 520 ± 20 nm. See

Fig. 1

for structures.



T. Fossen et al. / Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140

1135


Table 2

1

H NMR spectral data for 1–7, in CF



3

COOD–CD


3

OD (5:95; v/v) at 25

°C

1

2



3

4

5



6

7

ppm Hz



ppm Hz

ppm Hz


ppm Hz

ppm Hz


ppm Hz

ppm Hz


Aglycone

4

8.96 s



9.05 s

9.11 d 0.8

9.13 d 0.8

9.08 d 0.8

8,81 d 0.7

9.07 d 0.8

6

7.08 d 1.9



7.11 d 1.8

7.11 d 2.0

7.11 d 1.9

6.78 d 2.1

7.07 d 2.0

7.10 d 1.9

8

7.13 d 1.9



7.21 d 1.8

7.25 dd 2.0, 0.8

7.26 dd 1.9, 0.8

7.07 dd 2.1, 0.8

7.00 dd 2.0, 0.7

7.07 dd 1.9, 0.8

2

I

/6



I

7.96 s


8.07 s

8.13 s


8.14 s

8.11 s


8.03 s

8.03 s


OMe

4.05 s


4.09 s

4.11 s


4.11 s

4.11 s


4.12 s

4.08 s


3-O-b-Glucopyranoside

1

II



5.60 d 7.7

5.60 d 7.9

5.52 d 7.7

5.53 d 7.7

5.45 d 7.7

5.54 d 7.8

5.51 d 7.7

2

II



3.77 m

3.78 dd 7.9, 9.2

3.76 dd 7.7, 9.2

3.77 m


3.74 dd 7.7, 9.1

3.82 dd 7.8, 9.1

3.80 m

3

II



3.69 m

3.68 t 9.2

3.66 t 9.2

3.65 t 9.1

3.64 m

3.67 t 9.1



3.68 m

4

II



3.52 t 9.4

3.53 dd 9.2, 8.8

3.53 dd 9.2, 9.8

3.55 dd 9.5, 9.1

3.52 m

3.53 dd 9.1, 9.7



3.59 m

5

II



3.90 ddd 2.1, 6.5, 9.0

3.90 ddd 2.2, 6.6, 8.8

3.85 ddd 1.8, 5.7, 9.8

3.84 m


3.81 m

4.03 m


3.96 m

6A

II



4.12 dd 12.0, 2.1

4.10 dd 11.9, 2.2

4.09 dd 11.4, 1.8

4.06 dd 11.6, 1.9

4.11 dd 11.1, 1.9

4.71 dd 12.0, 9.0

4.56 m

6B

II



3.77 m

3.76 m


3.76 m

3.79 m


3.72 m

4.46 dd 12.0, 2.6

4.56 m

5-O-b-Glucopyranoside



1

III


5.30 d 7.7

5.29 d 7.9

5.31 d 7.7

5.31 d 7.7

5.28 d 7.7

5.25 d 7.9

2

III


3.79 m

3.77 m


3.79 dd 7.7, 9.0

3.77 m


3.86 dd 7.7, 9.1

3.83 m


3

III


3.68 m

3.66 m


3.68 t 9.0

3.67 t 9.1

3.67 t 9.1

3.65 m


4

III


3.68 m

3.65 m


3.63 dd 9.0, 9.5

3.58 m


3.57 dd 9.1, 9.6

3.52 m


5

III


3.71 m

3.70 ddd 2.0, 5.3,

*

3.93 ddd 2.1, 7.0, 9.5



3.91 ddd 2.2, 7.0, 9.7

3.71 ddd 2.1, 6.0, 9.6

3.69 m

6A

III



4.06 dd

*

2.1,



4.05 dd 2.0, 12.1

4.66 dd 2.1, 12.2

4.65 dd 2.2, 12.0

4.14 dd 12.0, 2.1

4.06 m

6B

III



3.95 dd 12.3, 5.0

3.92 dd 12.1, 5.3

4.51 dd 7.0, 12.2

4.47 dd 7.0, 12.0

3.91 dd 12.0, 6.0

3.82 m


6

II

-O-a-Rhamnopyranosyl



a

1

IV



4.74 d 1.5

4.76 d 1.5

4.74 d 1.5

4.78 d 1.6

4.77 d 1.7

2

IV



3.79 m

3.84 dd 3.5, 1.5

3.81 dd 3.4, 1.5

3.88 dd 3.4, 1.6

3.92 dd 3.4, 1.7

3

IV



3.67 dd 3.5, 9.5

3.86 dd 3.5, 9.7

3.67 dd 3.4, 9.6

3.84 dd 3.4, 9.7

3.86 dd

*

3.4



4

IV

3.36 t 9.5



4.93 t 9.7

3.36 t 9.6

4.94 t 9.7

4.97 t 9.8

5

IV

3.60 dd 9.5, 6.3



3.76 m

3.60 dd 9.6, 6.4

3.73 dd 9.7, 6.3

3.76 dd 9.8, 6.3

6

IV

1.22 d 6.3



1.12 d 6.4

1.19 d 6.4

1.08 d 6.3

1.12 d 6.3

6

III


-O-Malonyl

2

3.44 s



3.47 s

4

IV



-O-Malonyl

a

2



3.44 s

3.47 s


3.44 s

6

II



-p-Coumaroyl

Z-config.


E-config.

a

5.83 d 12.7



6.28 d 15.9

b

6.62 d 12.7



7.45 d 15.9

2/6


7.30

0

d



0

8.7


7.36

0

d



0

8.7


3/5

6.47


0

d

0



8.7

6.84


0

d

0



8.7

m = multiplet or overlap with solvent peak.

a 1

H resonances belonging to the rhamnose unit of pigment 5 are annotated as H-1



III

–H-6


III

.

*



Overlap.

1136


T.

Fossen


et

al.


/

Phytochem

istry

66

(2005)



1133–1140

formula C

41

H



49

O

27



, confirmed the identity of 4 to be the

novel anthocyanin malvidin 3-O-(6

II

-O-(4


IV

-O-malonyl-

a

-rhamnopyranosyl)-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-(6



III

-O-


malonyl-b-glucopyranoside) (

Fig. 1


).

The NMR resonances of pigment 5 shared many sim-

ilarities with the corresponding resonances of 2 (

Tables


2 and 3

), in accordance with malvidin 3-rutinoside acyl-

ated with one unit malonic acid. The downfield shift of

Table 3


13

C NMR spectral data for 1–4 and 7 in CF

3

COOD–CD


3

OD (5:95; v/v) at 25

°C

1

2



3

4

7



Aglycone

2

163.98



164.31

164.9


164.92

164.89


3

146.05


146.19

146.3


146.40

146.00


4

134.56


134.80

135.3


135.46

136.38


5

156.65


156.75

156.5


156.58

157.34


6

105.55


105.64

106.0


106.03

106.11


7

169.88


169.93

170.25


169.8

170.01


8

97.68


97.71

97.6


97.65

97.70


9

157.14


157.29

157.3


157.47

156.87


10

113.14


113.28

113.4


113.47

113.47


1

I

119.50



119.58

119.69


119.65

119.58


2

I

/6



I

110.87


110.92

111.14


111.07

110.95


3

I

/5



I

149.82


149.87

149.95


149.93

149.84


4

I

147.27



147.28

147.3


147.37

147.21


OMe

57.31


57.29

57.32


57.31

57.26


3-O-b-Glucopyranoside

1

II



102.59

102.78


103.4

103.50


103.46

2

II



74.74

74.75


a

74.70


a

74.70


a

74.77


3

II

78.34



78.28

78.24


78.14

78.15


4

II

71.47



71.46

71.27


71.25

71.89


5

II

77.74



77.59

77.83


77.47

75.88


6

II

67.51



67.50

67.30


66.95

64.11


5-O-b-Glucopyranoside

1

III



102.75

102.85


102.50

102.40


103.18

2

III



74.74

74.81


a

74.95


a

74.93


a

74.83


3

III


77.89

77.91


78.24

77.75


77.91

4

III



70.75

70.82


71.24

71.25


71.28

5

III



78.67

78.66


76.10

76.02


78.92

6

III



62.08

62.10


65.44

65.34


62.59

6

II



-O-a-Rhamnopyranosyl

1

IV



102.21

102.11


102.02

101.67


2

IV

71.93



71.94

72.05


72.07

3

IV



72.28

70.14


72.30

70.14


4

IV

73.86



76.43

73.85


76.51

5

IV



69.77

67.50


69.82

67.55


6

IV

17.94



17.62

17.94


17.60

6

III



-O-Malonyl

1

168.79



168.48

2

nd



nd

3

169.65



168.92

6

II



-O-p-Coumaroyl

1

126.81



2/6

131.39


3/5

116.84


4

161.36


a

114.58


b

146.98


C

@O

169.02



4

IV

-O-Malonyl



1

168.36


167.95

2

41.9



nd

3

170.29



nd

nd = not detected.

a

Assignments may be reversed.



T. Fossen et al. / Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140

1137


H-4

III


(d 4.97) showed the linkage between the malonyl

and the terminal rhamnose unit at the 4

III

-hydroxyl.



Thus, 5 was identified as the novel pigment malvidin

3-O-(6


II

-O-(4


III

-O-malonyl-a-rhamnopyranosyl)-b-glu-

copyranoside) (

Fig. 1


). A molecular ion at m/z 725 cor-

responding to malvidin malonyl-rhamnosyl-glucoside

confirmed this identification.

The UV–Vis spectrum of pigment 7 showed an in-

creased absorption around 320 nm indicating the pres-

ence of aromatic acylation (

Table 1

). The 1D



1

H and


1D

13

C NMR spectra of pigment 7 showed malvidin



aglycone, two glucose units and one p-coumaroyl unit

(

Tables 2 and 3



). The coupling constants of H-a and

H-b (15.9 Hz) of the p-coumaroyl revealed E-configura-

tion. All the

1

H sugar resonances were assigned by the



DQF-COSY and the TOCSY experiments, and the cor-

responding

13

C resonances were then assigned by the



1

H–

13



C HSQC experiment. The crosspeaks at d 5.51/

146.1 (H-1

II

/C-3) and d 5.25/157.1 (H-1



III

/C-5) showed

that the glucose units were attached to the aglycone 3-

and 5-hydroxyls, respectively. The downfield chemical

shift values of H-6A

II

(d 4.56), H-6B



II

(d 4.56) and C-

6A

II

(d 64.11), respectively, indicated that the p-couma-



royl was attached to the 6

II

-hydroxyl. The crosspeaks at



d

4.56/169.2 (H-6A

II

, H-6B


II

/C

@O p-coumaroyl) con-



firmed the linkage between the 3-glucose and the p-cou-

maroyl moiety to be at the 6

II

-hydroxyl. A molecular ion



at m/z 801 corresponding to malvidin coumaroyl-dig-

lucoside and fragment ions at m/z 639, m/z 493 and

m/z 331 corresponding to malvidin coumaroylglucoside,

malvidin glucoside and malvidin aglycone, respectively,

in the ESI-MS spectrum confirmed the identity of 7 to

be malvidin 3-O-(6

II

-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl-b-glucopyrano-



side)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside.

Hrazdina and Franzese

(1974)

reported malvidin 3-O-(6



II

-O-p-coumaroyl-b-

glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside in Ives grapes

(Vitaceae), however, without determining the configura-

tion

of

the



double

bond


of

the


acyl

moiety.


Saito and Harborne (1992)

reported malvidin 3-O-(6

II

-

O-E-p-coumaroyl-b-glucopyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyr-



anoside in several Labiatae spp., and

Tamura et al.

(1994)

have previously given proton NMR data for this



pigment. This anthocyanin has not previously been

identified in Oxalidaceae.

The UV–Vis spectrum of pigment 6 showed an in-

creased absorption around 320 nm indicating the pres-

ence of aromatic acylation. The 1D

1

H spectrum and



the 2D DQF-COSY and the TOCSY spectra of pigment

6 shared many similarities with that of 7 showing malvidin

aglycone, two glucose units and one unit p-coumaric acid

(

Table 2



). However, contrary to that of 7, the coupling

constants of H-a and H-b (12.9 Hz) of the p-coumaroyl

moiety of 6 revealed Z-configuration. A molecular ion

at m/z 801.225 in the high resolution ESI-MS spectrum

of 6 was in accordance with the molecular formula

C

38



H

41

O



19

corresponding

to

malvidin


coumaroyl-

diglucoside. Thus, pigment 6 was identified as the novel

pigment malvidin 3-O-(6

II

-O-(Z)-p-coumaroyl-b-gluco-



pyranoside)-5-O-b-glucopyranoside (

Fig. 1


).

In the pigments 2, 4 and 5 a malonyl unit is linked to

the rhamnose 4-position, which has not been reported

for any anthocyanin before. Among the thirty-seven dif-

ferent anthocyanins, which previously have been re-

ported to contain an acylated rutinosyl group, thirty-

two are acylated with one or more cinnamoyl unit

(

Andersen and Jordheim, 2005



), and none with a malo-

nyl unit as found in pigment 2, 4 and 5. Anthocyanins

acylated with aromatic acids (6 and 7) have previously

not been reported to occur in the family Oxalidaceae.

The relative proportions of the anthocyanins 1–7 in the

acidified methanolic extract of leaves of O. triangularis

are presented in

Table 1


. The two major anthocyanins

malvidin 3-rutinoside-5-glucoside (1) and its 4

IV

-malonyl


derivative (2) constitute 85% of the total anthocyanin

content. Anthocyanins acylated with malonic acid and

p-coumaric acid constitute above 37% and 5%, respec-

tively, of the total anthocyanin content in leaves of

O. triangularis.

3. Experimental

3.1. Isolation of pigments

Purple shamrock was cultivated in Bergen. A voucher

specimen has been deposited in Bergen Herbarium, Uni-

versity of Bergen (accession number H/505).

Leaves (100 g) were cut into pieces and extracted (2

times) with 0.5% TFA in MeOH at 4

°C. The filtered ex-

tract was concentrated under reduced pressure, purified



O

OH

HO

OH

O

O

HO

OH

OCH

3

OCH

3

O

HO

O

OH

OH

HO

O

H

3

C

OH

O

OH

O

O

O

OH

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

Fig. 3. Long-range

1

H–

13



C correlations in the HMBC spectrum of

pigment 2.

1138

T. Fossen et al. / Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140



by partition (three times) against EtOAc (equal volume),

and then subjected to Amberlite XAD-7 column chro-

matography (

Goto et al., 1982

). The anthocyanins were

further


purified

on

a



Sephadex

LH-20


column

(100


· 5 cm) using MeOH–H

2

O–TFA (29.7:70:0.3; v/v)



to MeOH-H

2

O-TFA (69.7:30:0.3; v/v) (stepwise gradi-



ent elution). The flow rate was 2.5 ml min

À1

. Pure



anthocyanins were then isolated by preparative HPLC.

Preparative HPLC (Gilson 305/306 pump equipped

with an HP-1040A detector) was performed with an

ODS-Hypersil column (25

· 2.2 cm, 5 lm) using the sol-

vents HCOOH–H

2

O (1:19, v/v) (A) and HCOOH–H



2

O–

MeOH (1:4:5, v/v) (B). The elution profile consisted of a



linear gradient from 10% B to 100% B for 45 min, iso-

cratic elution (100% B) for the next 13 min, followed

by linear gradient from 100% B to 10% B for 1 min.

The flow rate was 14 ml min

À1

, and aliquots of 300 ll



were injected. Altogether 80 mg of pigment 1, 20 mg of

pigment 2, 5 mg of pigment 3, 5 mg of pigment 4,

2 mg of pigment 6, 7 mg of pigment 7, in addition to

2 mg of a mixture of pigment 5 and malvidin 3-rutino-

side, respectively, were isolated.

3.2. Analytical HPLC

Analytical HPLC was performed with an ODS-

Hypersil column (25

· 0.3 cm, 5 lm) using the solvents

HCOOH–H


2

O (1:19) (A) and HCOOH–H

2

O–MeOH


(1:4:5) (B). The gradient consisted of a linear gradient

from 10% B to 100% B for 23 min, 100% B for the next

5 min, followed by linear gradient from 100% B to 10%

B for 1 min. The flow rate was 0.75 ml min

À1

, and ali-



quots of 15 ll were injected.

3.3. Spectroscopy

UV–Vis absorption spectra were recorded on-line

during HPLC analysis over the wavelength range 240–

600 nm in steps of 2 nm.

The NMR experiments were obtained at 600.13 and

150.90 MHz for

1

H and



13

C, respectively, on a Bruker

DRX-600 instrument equipped with a multinuclear in-

verse probe for the 1D

1

H and the 2D Heteronuclear



Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC), Heteronuclear

Multiple Bond Correlations (HMBC) and Double

Quantum Filtered Correlation Spectroscopy (DQF-

COSY) experiments. The

13

C 1D experiment was per-



formed on a

1

H/



13

C BBO probe. Sample temperatures

were stabilised at 25

°C. The deuteriomethyl

13

C signal


and the residual

1

H signal of the solvent (CF



3

CO

2



D–

CD

3



OD; 5:95, v/v) were used as secondary references

(d 49.0 and d 3.40 from TMS, respectively). See

Fossen

et al. (2003)



for more experimental details.

Low-resolution mass spectral data were achieved by a

LCMS system (Waters 2690 HPLC-system connected to

Micromass LCZ mass spectrometer) with electrospray

ionisation in positive mode (ESP+). See

Fossen et al.

(2003)

for more experimental details. High resolution



mass spectra were recorded at the Gesellschaft fu¨r Bio-

technologische Forschung (GBF), Abteilung Strukturbi-

ologie (Braunschweig, Germany). The pigments were

dissolved in a 1:1 (vol:vol) methanol/1% formic acid

solution. Approximately 3 ll of this solution (final con-

centration ca. 20 pmol/l) were filled into a gold-coated

nanospray glass capillary (Protana, Odense, Denmark).

The tip of the capillary was placed orthogonally in front

of the entrance hole of a quadrupole time-of-flight

(QTOF 2) mass spectrometer (Micromass, Manchester,

Great Britain) equipped with a nanospray ion source,

and a voltage of approximately 1000 V was applied.

The isotopic composition of the sample was determined

in the accurate mass mode using stachyose and cyclod-

extrane (Glc7) ([M + H]

+

= 667.0994; 1135,3776 Da) as



internal reference compounds.

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Professor Dag Olav

Øvstedal, Department of Botany, University of Bergen,

for identification of Oxalis triangularis, Mrs. Solrunn

Marie Fosse for providing the original plant material,

Dr. Manfred Nimtz and Mrs. Undine Felgentra¨ger,

Gesellschaft fu¨r Biotechnologische Forschung (GBF)

(Braunschweig, Germany) for the high resolution elec-

trospray mass spectra, and The Norwegian Research

Council (NFR) for support. TF and SR gratefully

acknowledge NFR and The State Education Loan

Fund, respectively, for their fellowships.

References

Alcalde-Eon, C., Saavedra, G., De Pasqual-Teresa, S., Rivas-Gonzalo,

J.C., 2004. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identifica-

tion of anthocyanins of isla oca (Oxalis tuberosa Mol.) tubers. J.

Chromatogr. A 1054, 211–215.

Andersen, Ø.M., Jordheim, M., 2005. Anthocyanins. In: Andersen,

Ø.M., Markham, K.R. (Eds.), Flavonoids: Chemistry, Biochemis-

try and Applications. CRC Press, Boca Raton, in press.

Crouch, N.R., van Staden, L.F., Drewes, S.E., Meyer, H.J., 1993.

Accumulation of cyanidin 3-glucoside in callus cultures of Oxalis

reclinata. J. Plant Physiol. 142, 109–111.

Fossen, T., Andersen, Ø.M., 2000. Anthocyanins from tubers and

shoots of the purple potato, Solanum tuberosum. J. Hortic. Sci.

Biotechnol. 75, 360–363.

Fossen, T., Slimestad, R., Andersen, Ø.M., 2003. Anthocyanins with

4

0

-glucosidation from red onion, Allium cepa. Phytochemistry 64,



1367–1374.

Goto, T., Kondo, T., Tamura, H., Imagawa, H., Iino, A., Takeda, K.,

1982. Structure of gentiodelphin, an acylated anthocyanin isolated

from Gentiana makinoi, that is stable in dilute aqueous solution.

Tetrahedron Lett. 23, 3695–3698.

Gunasegaran, R., 1992. Flavonoids and anthocyanins of three

Oxalidaceae. Fitoterapia 63, 89–90.

T. Fossen et al. / Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140

1139


Hrazdina, G., Franzese, A., 1974. Structure and properties of the

acylated anthocyanins from Vitis species. Phytochemistry 13, 225–

229.

Pazmin˜o-Dura´n, E.A., Giusti, M.M., Wrolstad, R.E., Glo´ria, M.B.A.,



2001. Anthocyanins from Oxalis triangularis as potential food

colorants. Food Chem. 75, 211–216.

Saito, N., Harborne, J.B., 1992. Correlations between anthocyanin

type, pollinator and flower colour in the Labiatae. Phytochemistry

31, 3009–3015.

Tamura, H., Hayashi, Y., Sugisawa, H., Kondo, T., 1994. Structure

determination of acylated anthocyanins in Muscat bailey A grapes

by Homonuclear Hartmann–Hahn (HOHAHA) spectroscopy and

liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry. Phytochem. Analysis

5, 190–196.

Wielanek, M., Urbanek, H., Dobras, M., 2004. Regeneration of

Oxalis triangularis from hairy roots and the influence of

glutathione on anthocyanin production. Biotechnologia 2, 260–

266.


1140

T. Fossen et al. / Phytochemistry 66 (2005) 1133–1140




Yüklə 141,64 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə