African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9 (20), pp. 5505-5510, 19 October, 2009



Yüklə 139,73 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix03.07.2017
ölçüsü139,73 Kb.

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9 (20), pp. 5505-5510, 19 October, 2009     

Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB 

ISSN 1684–5315 © 2009 Academic Journals  

 

 



 

 

Full Length Research Paper 

 

Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) activity 

from cowpea storage bruchid, 

Callosobrochus 

maculatus Frabiricius by some plant extracts 

 

Ayodele O. Kolawole



1

*, Ralphael E. Okonji

2

 and Joshua O. Ajele

 

1



Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. 

  

2



Department of Biochemistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. 

 

Accepted 13 March, 2008 



 

Crude  ethanolic  extracts  of

  Tithonia  diversifolia,  Cyperus  rotundus  and  Hyptis  suavolens  have 

insecticidal  activity  against 

Callosobrochus  maculatus  Frabiricius.  The  ethanol  extracts  of  the  plants 

have  positive  results  for  alkaloids,  saponin,  tannins  and  flavonoids.  Antioxidant  and  reducing 

properties were also determined in the crude ethanol extracts. Cowpea storage bruchid, 

C. maculatus 

glutathione S-transferases was a potential target for the plants extracts. Gluathione S-transferase from 

cowpea  storage  bruchid  was  purified  by  affinity  gel  chromatography  of  glutathione  sepharose. 

Inhibition  effect  of  the  plant  extracts  on  the  GST  was  studied  by  spectrophotometric  method.  The 

binding  of  the  extract  was  competitive  by  the  Dixon  plot  with  Ki  of  84,  132  and  180  ug/mL  for 

T. 

diversifolia  ,  C.    rotundus  and  H.    suavolens,  respectively.  We  suggest  that  reported  efficacy  of  the 

extract is due to the antioxidant properties and competitve binding inhibition on GST may contribute to 

the pharmacological basis of the efficacy against cowpea storage bruchid, 

C. maculatus Frabiricius and 

its attendant managements. 

 

Key words:

 Glutathione S-transferases, cowpea storage bruchids, plant extracts, inhibition. 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Cowpea, 



Vigna  unguiculata

  L.  (Walp)  is  an  important 

crop in tropical countries especially in West Africa where 

it  is  a  cheap  source  of  dietary  protein  (Labeyire  et  al



.

1981). Cowpea storage bruchid (



Callosobruchus macula-

tus

)  depredates  stored  cowpea  (Jackai  and  Adalla, 

1986).  The  huge  post  harvest  losses  and  quality 

detoriation caused by this insect pest are major problems 

of  assuring  food  security  in  developing  countries  like 

Nigeria  (Lale,  1992).  Effective  and  efficient  control  of 

storage  insect  pests  are  centred  mainly  on  synthetic 

insecticides.  The  use  of  these  synthetic  chemical  is 

hampered by many attendant problems: development  of 

resistant  insect  strains,  toxic  residues  in  foods  and  

humans; workers’ safety and high  cost  of  procurements 

(Adedire,  2003).  These  have  necessisated  research  on 

the  use  of  alternative  eco-friendly  insect  pest  control 

methods amongst  which  are  the  use  of  plant  product. 

 

 

 



*Corresponding author. E-mail: aokolawole@ccmb.res.in. 

Lale  (1992)  reported  that  plant  materials  and  local 

traditonal methods are much safer than insecticides and 

suggested that their use  needed exploitation.The effects 

of  some  plants  extracts  on  the  biological  parameters  of 

the  herbivourous  insects  (e.g.  oviposition,  mortality  rate, 

adult  emergence,  developmental  rate,mortality,  fecudity 

and egg viablity) has been reported. Boeke et al. (2001) 

has undertaken a comprehensive review on the subject. 

Studies  by  Adedire  and  Lajde  (1999)  and  Adedire  and 

Akineye (2004) showed that powder and ethanolic extract 

of 


Tithonia  diversifolia,  Cyperus  rotundus,  Hyptis  suavo-

lens 

and


 Aframomum melegueta 

have insecticidal activity 

against cowpea storage bruchid, 

C. maculatus

   F. 


Two enzymatic detoxification systems were found to be 

involved  in  the  adaptation  of  some  insects  to  their 

allelopathic  host  plants:  Myrosinase  ( -thioglucosidase, 

EC  3.2.3.1)  and  glutathione  S-transferases.  However 

glutathione  S-transferases  play  more  important  role  in 

detoxification  (Francis  et  al,  2005).  Glutathione  S-

transferases  (GSTs;  EC  2.5.1.18)  have  attracted 

attention in insects because  of  their  involvement  in  the 



5506         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

defense  towards  insecticides  mainly  organophosphates, 

organochlorines  and  cyclodienes  (Clark  et  al.,  1986; 

Grant and Matsumura, 1989; Reidy et al., 1990; Fournier 

et  al

., 

1992).  Fakae  et  al.  (2000)  has  tested 



Piliostigma 

tholnningii,  Ocimum  gratissium

,

  Nauclea  latifolia 

and

 

Alstonia  boonei

  against  gastrointestinal  helminthes  of 

animals  and  man.  The  nematodes  glutathione  S-

transferases  are  potential  drug  target  and  inhibitory 

properties  of  these  plant  extracts  against  the  GST  may 

contributed to the pharmacological basis of their efficacy. 

  Currently,  comprehensive  studies  on  glutathione  S-

transferases from cowpea storage bruchid (



C. maculatus

are  lacking.  This  work  is  aimed  at  investigating  the 



pharmacological basis of the efficacy of ethanolic extacts 

of 


T. diversifolia 

,

 C. rotundus

,

 H. suavolens

 and


 A. mele-

gueta 

against Cowpea storage bruchid (



C. maculatus

) by 


spectrophotometric method. 

 

 



MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

Glutathione  and  2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl  (DPPH)  were  from 



Sigma Company St. Louis, USA; 1-chloro-2,4- dinitrobenzene  was 

purchased  from  Aldrich  Chemicals,  USA.  Glutathione-Sepharose 

was from Armersham Pharmacia, Upsalla, Sweden. Other reagents 

used were of analytical grade and water used was Milli Q.   



 

 

Preparation of Plant/Sample preparation 

 

Fresh leaves of 



T. diversifolia

,

 C. rotundus 

and

 H. suavolens

 were 


collected from a piece of land at Federal University of Technology, 

Akure, Nigeria. The leaves were later taken to the Crop Production 

Department  of  the  Federal  University  of  Technology  for  botanical 

identification.  The  plant  extracts  were  prepared  as  described  by 

Adedire and Akinneye (2003) with slight modification. Two hundred 

gram (200 g) of each sample was air dried, pulverized and soaked 

in the 200 ml of 95% absolute ethanol for 24 h and boiled at 60˚C 

for 30 min  on  a heating mantle. The solution was then percolated 

through  Whatman  No  1  filter  paper  and  the  resulting  filtrate  was 

kept  in  a  brown  bottle  and  used  as  stock  solution  stored  at  4˚C. 

Solutions of lower concentrations were derived by diluting the stock 

with  ethanol  prior  to  phytochemical  screening.  Aliquots  for  GST 

inhibition studies was centrifuged at 30 000 X g for 15 min at 4˚C. 

The clear supernatant was frozen dried and stored for 4˚C prior to 

the toxicity bioassay on GST. 

 

 

Phytochemical screening

 

 



The  ethanolic  extract  was  screened  for  the  presence  of  some 

secondary  metabolites  such  as  saponins,  tannins  and  flavonoids. 

This  was  done  according  to  the  methods  described  by  Sofowora 

(1993). 


 

 

Total phenol 

 

The  concentrations  of  phenolic  compounds  in  the  ethanolic 

extracts, expressed as tannin equivalents, were measured using a 

modified method of Singleton et al



(1999) with some modifications. 

Ethanolic extract (0.1 g) was dissolved in 5 ml of acetone for 10 min 

on ice. To 0.5 ml of the solution, 0.5 ml of distilled water, 0.5 ml of 

folin’s  reagent  (1:1)  and  2.5  ml  of  20%  sodium  carbonate  were 

added. The reaction mixtures were kept in the dark for 40 min, after 

which the absorbance was read at 750 nm. Phenol contents were 

extrapolated from standard tannin calibration curve. 

 

 

 

 

Reducing property 

 

The  ability  of  ethanolic  extracts  to  reduce  ferric  chloride  was 



measured according to a modified method of Pullido et al. (2000). 

The  reducing  property  was  expressed  as  tocopherol  (Vitamin  E) 

equivalent.  The  ethanol  extracts  (5  g)  was  dissolved  in  10  ml  of 

water  and  filtered.  To  2.5  ml  of  the  filtrate,  2.5  ml  of  phosphate 

buffer (pH 6.6) and  2.5 ml of potassium ferrocyanide were added. 

The  mixtures  were  incubated  at  a  temperature  40°C.  10%  trichlo-

roacetic  acid  was  added.  The  resulting  mixtures  were  centrifuged 

for 10 min. The supernatant (5 ml) was mixed with 5 ml of distilled 

water  and  1.0  ml  of  0.1%  ferric  chloride.  The  absorbance  of  the 

standard  and  the  sample  were  read  at  700  nm  against  reagent 

blank made of ethanol instead of ethanolic extract. 

 

 

Free radical scavenging 

 

The  scavenging  activity  of  the  Vitamin  E  and 



T.  diversifolia,C. 

rotundu 

and


, H. suavolens 

ethanolic leaf extract on DPPH radicals 

were determined according to the method of Chu et al

(2000). An 

aliquot of 0.5 ml of 0.1 mM DPPH radical in ethanol was added to 

test tubes containing 1 ml of different concentrations (0 – 5 mg/ml) 

of  the  ethanolic  extract.  The  reaction  mixture  was  mixed  at  room 

temperature and kept for 20 min. The absorbance was read at 520 

nm  against  distilled  water.  Radical  scavenging  capacity  of  each 

extract  has  been  calculated  as  the  percent  DPPH  radical 

scavenging affect which is: 

 

DPPH Scavenging Effect (%) = ([A



o

 – A


i

)] / A


o

 X 100 


 

 

Where A



o

 is the absorbance of the control with ethanol and A

1

 is the 


absorbance of the sample in the presence of the extracts. 

 

 

 

Preparation of cytosolic fraction and purification of GST

 

 



 

 

C. maculatus

 adults were obtained from naturally infested cowpea 

seeds Sokoto  white cultivar of cowpea from Oba Market in Akure, 

Nigeria.  The  whole  organism  was  homogenized  in  a  buffer  (35% 

w/v,  10  mM  Tris-HCl,  250  mM  sucrose  1  mM  phenylmetha-

nesulfonyl  fluoride,  1  mM  dithiothreitol  pH  7.4)  and  centrifuged  at 

14,000 rpm for 40 min to remove cell debris using Eppendorf cold 

centrifuge  5810  R.  The  supernatant  was  purified  on  GSH-

Sepharose column as described by Kolawole and Ajele (2004). The 

glutathione removed by ultralfitration by Millipore Amicon ultralfitra-

tion  and  desalting  column.  The  enzyme  was  stored  at  -70˚C  until 

used. 

 

 

Determination  of  protein  concentration  and  glutathione  S- 

transferases assay 

 

GST  activity  was  determined  according  to  Habig  et  al.  (1974)  as 

modified  by  Ajele  and  Afolayan  (1992).  For  a  typical  assay,  the 

reaction  mixture  of  3  ml  containing  a  final  concentration,  100  mM 

potassium phosphate buffer pH 6.5 and 1 mM each of Glutathione 

(GSH)  and  1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene  (CDNB),  together  with  an 

appropriate  amount    of    enzyme.    Three  replicates  were  used  for 

each measure. One unit of GSTs activity is defined as the amount 

of  enzyme  producing  l  mol  thioether  per  min.  The  extinction 

coefficient  for  CDNB  conjugate  at  340  nm  is  0.0096  M

-1

  cm


-1

 

(Habig et al



.,

 1974). The protein concentration was determined by 

the  method  of  Bradford  Method  (1976).  Two  replicates  were  used 

for each experiments using bovine serum albumin as a standard. A 

Shimadzu UV-Visible 1601 double beam digital spectrophotometer 

was  used  for  the  assay.  The  kinetic  analysis  of  inhibition  and 

inhibition  interaction  was  done  by  adding  known  concentrations  of 

plant extracts to the assay buffer prior to assay. 



Kolawole et al.         5507 

 

 



 

Table 1

. Plant used for insecticial activity and their phytochemical components. 

 

 

 



 

 

Table 2.

 Antioxidant activities of the plants. 

 

Plants (mg/ml) 



Total phenols (mg/ml) 

Reducing properties (mg/ml) 

Tithonia diversifolia

 

0.26 ± 0.01 



0.043 ± 0.01 

Cyperus rotundus 

0.21 ± 0.007



 

0.040  ± 0.01



 

Hyptis suavolens

 

0.15 ± 0.00 



0.034 ± 0.02 

 

 



 

RESULTS 

 

Phytochemical Screening 

 

The phytochemical screening of 



T. diversifolia, H. suavo-

lens   

and 


C.  rotundus 

and


 

revealed  the  presence  of 

alkaloids , saponin and tannins and flavonoids as shown 

in Table 1. 

 

 

Antioxidant properties 



 

The antioxidant properties of



 T. diversifolia , C. rotundus 

and


 H. suavolens

 as reveals by total phenol content  was 

0.26  ±  0.01,  0.21  ±  0.007  and  0.15  ±  0.01  mg/ml, 

respectively  as  tannin  equivqlents  (Table  2). 



T. 

diversifolia, C. rotundus 

and


 H. suavolens

 have reducing 

properties  level  of    0.043,  0.040  and  0.034  mg/ml, 

respectively. DPPH (1, 1–diphenyl–2-Picrylhydrazyl) per-

cent scavenging activities of the plants were measured in 

different concentration ranging from 0 to 5 mg/ml.  5 mg/ 

ml of 

T. diversifolia 

 showed 60% inhibtion; 



C. rotundus, 

53%


 

and 


H.  suavolens, 

44%    inhibition  as  shown  in 

Figure 1. 

 

 



Effect of the plant extracts on 

C. maculatus GST

 

 



The  glutathione  S-transferases  from  cowpea  storage 

bruchids (



C.maculatus

) was rapidly purified by affinity gel 

of  glutathione-agarose.  The  interested  plant  extracts 

were screened for their effect on GST activity apart from 

their  antioxidant  properties.  The  data  were  obtained  in 

the  experiment  to  determine  the  effect  of 



T.  diversifolia, 

C.  rotundus 

and 


H.  suavolens 

ethanolic



 

extracts  on 

glutathione S-transferases from cowpea storage bruchids 

(

C.  maculatus

)  and  to  establish  the  type  of  inhibition 

mechanism.  The  straight  line  graph  result  of  a  series  of 

reciprocal of GST activity against inhibition concentration 

of all ethanolic plant extracts was observed. The series of 

line  converged  at  a  point  away  from  the  origin.  The  Ki 

values are 84,  132  and  180  g/mL,  respectively  for  



T.

  

diversifolia , C. rotundus 

and 

 H. suavolens

 (Figures 2, 3 

and 4) 

 

 



DISCUSSION 

 

The  use  of  plant  products  to  protect  stored  cowpea, 



V. 

unguiculata

  L.  (Walp)    against  cowpea  storage  bruchids 

(

C.  maculatus

)  predation  is  an  age  long  practice  in 

Nigeria  (Lale,  1992).  The  ethanolic  extract  of 

T.  diversi-

folia , C. rotundus 

and


 H. suavolens

 has been reported to 

have  potent  insecticidal  activity  against  cowpea  storage 

bruchid, 



C.  maculatus

      F.  These  plants  have  different 

degree  of  insecticidal  potentials  on  the  insect  (Adedire 

and Akinneye, 2003; Adedire and Lajide, 1999)   

  In  this  present  investigation  our  aim  was  to  collect 

information  on  the  possible      pharmacological  basis  for 

the  efficacy  of  these  plant  extracts  on  the  effective 

management of cowpea storage bruchids (



C. maculatus

). 


The  plant  extracts  were  screened  for  the  bioactive 

components  that  could  be  responsible  for  the  efficacy. 

Our result shows that alkaloids, saponin and tannins and 

flavonoids are some of the major contituents of the plants 

extracts.  The  presence  of  these  secondary  metabolites 

might  not  be  unconnected  to  their  insecticidal  activities. 

These  plant  extracts  also  have  high  content  of  poly-

phenols  and  antioxidant  activity.  Phenolic  constituents 

have  been  studied  extensively  as  important  contributors 

to  the  antioxidant  activity  in  plants  (Aruoma,  2003; 

Skerget  et  al.,  2005).There  are  reports  in  the  literature 

which  correlate  the  total  phenolics  content  of  a  plant 

extract  with  its  antioxidant  activity  (Coruh  et  al.

,

  2007a; 

Skerget  et  al

.,

  2005)  and  this  was  also  the  case  in  the 

present  study,  as  shown  in  Table  1.  The  extracts  with 

high  phenolics  content,  also  has  high  DPPH  radical 

scavenging. 

Our  preliminary  investigation  shows  that  all  the  plant 

extract  used  in  this  study  bring  about  the  inhibition  of 

crude GST extract from the cowpea storage bruchids (



C. 

maculatus

).  We  therefore  investigated  the  nature  of  the 

inhibition on  the  purified  sample  of  the  GST. From the   

Plant 

Plant part used 

Alkaloids 

Saponin 

Tannins 

Flavonids 

Tithonia diversifolia 

Leaves 






Cyperus rotundus 

Roots 


Trace 



Trace 

Hyptis suavolens 

Leaves 






5508         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 1.

  DPPH scavenging activities abilities of the plant extracts. 

 

 

 



 

 

Figure  2.

    Dixon  Plot  of  the  reciprocal  of  GST  activity  (1/V)  versus 



Tithonia  diversifolia

 

concentration utilizing 1.0 mM, 1.5 mM and 2.0 mM CDNB comcentrations. Lines of best fit 



were determined by least square linear regression analysis. 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure  3.

  Dixon  Plot  of  the  reciprocal  of  GST  activity  (1/V)  versus 



Hyptis  suavolens

 

concentration utilizing 1.0 mM, 1.5 mM and 2.0 mM CDNB comcentrations. Lines of best 



fit were determined by least square linear regression analysis. 

Kolawole et al.         5509 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 4.

 Dixon Plot of the reciprocal of GST activity (1/V) versus 



Cyperus rotundus

 

concentration utilizing 1.0 mM, 1.5 mM and 2.0 mM CDNB comcentrations. Lines of 



best fit were determined by least square linear regression analysis. 

 

 



 

results,  the  inhibition  was  found  to  be  competitive  as 

showed by the Dixon plot. This suggests that the extract 

binds  to  the  active  site  of  the  enzyme  and  therefore 

prevent  detoxification  role  of  the  enzyme.  The  enzyme 

has  been  reported  to  be  involved  in  the  adaptation  of 

insects to allelochemicals and insecticides (Francis et al., 

2005). Sigma class of GST is implicated to as protectors 

against oxidative stress in insects (Enayati et  al., 2005). 

The  observation  of  the 



in  vitro

  inhibition  of  cowpea 

storage  bruchids  (

C.  maculatus

)  glutathione  S-

transferases by the extracts of 

T. diversifolia, C. rotundus 

and


  H.  suavolens 

is  in  good  agreement  with  the 

earlier report  of  Fakae  et  al.

 

(2000)  that  the  GST  of 

parastic  nematodes  was  inhibited  by  some  Nigerian 

medicinal plants. This is also supported by the reports of 

Coruh  et  al.  (2007a,b) 

whose  

work  on


  Gundelia

 

tournefortii



Prangos ferulacea 

(L.) Lindl.



, Chaerophyllum 

macropodum 

Boiss.  and



  Heracleum  persicum 

Desf. 


extracts  showed  great  inhibition  on  glutathione-S-

transferase  activity.



 

The  inhibitory  effects  of  naturally 

occurring  plant  polyphenols  such  as  tannic  acid,  ellagic 

acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, stilbene, quercetin, curcu-

min  and  chlorogenic  acid  against  GST  have  long  been 

reported  by  many  researchers  (Kawabata  et  al.,  2000; 

Gyamfi 

et a

l., 2004). Quinines are also well-known exam-

ples  of  covalent  inhibitors  of  GST  enzymes  (Zanden  et 

al., 2004).  

  From our results  it  appears that the  extracts  with high 

polyphenols  and  reducing  properties  have  effective 

inhibition on the GST from the cowpea storage bruchids 

(

C.  maculatus

).  This  suggests  that  the  phytochemicals 

can exert insecticidal role by antioxidant activity. Francis 

et  al.  (2005)  reported  that  glucosinolates  and  isothio-

cynates from Brassicaceae plants are easily detoxified by 

GST  from 

Myzus  persicae

  aphid  and  this  is  responsible 

for its adaptation. However, Fakae et al. (2000) suggest 

the  combinatorial  approach  of  some  active  allelochemi-

cals  in  the  plant  extracts  on  the  effective  inhibition  of 

GST.  If  this  posture  holds,  the  combinatorial  approach 

prevents either modification of the target site or to ampli-

fied  production  of  this  detoxification  enzyme  (Haubruge 

and Amichot, 1995).   

   Spectrophotometric  methods  have  succeeded  in 

answering  the  question  of  the  pharmacological  basis  of 

the  insecticidal  activity  and  the  type  of  inhibition  on  the 

GST, a dimeric enzyme. The question still remains if the 

binding  of  this  extracts  brings  about  the  cooperative 

binding of the extracts on the other dimmers. This merits 

our further investigation. 

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 



 

The authors gratefully acknowledge the material support 

of  Centre  for  Cellular  and  Molecular  Biology  (CCMB), 

Hyderabad, India. 

 

 

REFERENCES  



 

Adedire  CO  (2003).  Use  of  nutmeg, 



Myristica fragrans

  (Houtt)  powder 

and  oil  for  the  control  of  cowpea  storage  bruchids, 

Callosobruchus 

maculatus

  (F.)  J.  Plant Dis. Prot. 109: 193-199. 

Adedire  CO, Akinneye  JO  (2003).  Biological  activity  of  three marigold, 

Tithonia  diversifolia

,  on  cowpea  seed  bruchids, 



Callosobruchus 

maculatus

 (Coleoptra: Bruchidae) Ann.  Appl.  Biol. 144: 185-189. 

Adedire  CO,  Lajide  L  (1999).  Toxicity  and  Oviposition  deterency  of 

some  plants  extracts  on  Cowpea  storage  bruchids 



Callosobruchus 

maculatus

 (F.)  J. Plant Dis.  Prot. 106: 647-653. 

Ajele  JO,  Afolayan  A  (1992).  Purification  and  characterization  of 

glutathione  transferase  from  Giant  African  land  snail 



Archachatina 

marginata.

 Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 103B: 47-55. 



5510         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

Aruoma  OI  (2003).  Methodological  considerations  for  characterizing 

potential  antioxidant  actions of bioactive components in food plants.   

    Mutat. Res. pp. 523-524, 9-20. 

Boeke SJ , Van Loon JJA, Van Huis A, Kossou DK , Dicke M (2001). 

The  use  of  plant  materials  to  protect  stored  leguminous  seeds 

against  seed  bettles:  a  review.  The  Netherlands.  Backhuys 

Publishers.  

Bradford KM (1976). A rapid and sensitive method for the quantification 

of microgramme quantities of protein utilizing the principles of protein-

dye binding. Anal. Biochem, 72: 248-254.  

Chu


 

YH,  Chang  CL,  Hsu  HF  (2000).  Flavonoid  contents  of  several 

vegetables and their antioxidant  activity.  J.  Sci.  Food  Agric.  80: 

561-556 


Coruh  N,  Sagˇdıc¸ogˇlu  Celep  AG,  zgo¨kc¸  FO  (2007a).  Antioxidant 

properties  of 



Prangos  ferulacea

  (L.)  Lindl., 



Chaerophyllum 

macropodum

  Boiss.  and 



Heracleum  persicum

  Desf.  from  Apiaceae  

family used as food in Eastern Anatolia and their inhibitory effects on 

glutathione-S-transferase. Food Chem. 100: 1237-1242. 

Coruh,  N,  Sagˇdıc¸ogˇlu  Celep  AG,  Ozgokce  FO,  Iscan  M  (2007b). 

Antioxidant  capacities  of 



Gundelia  tournefortii

  L.  extracts  and inhibi-

tion  on  glutathione-S-transferase  activity.  Food  Chem.  100:  1249-

1253. 


Francis  F,  Vanhaelen  N,  Haubruge  E  (2005).  Glutahthione  S-

transferases  in the  adaptation  to plant secondary metabolites  in  the 

Myzus persicae Aphid. Archives of Insect Biochem. and Physiol.  58 : 

166-174 


Gyamfi AM, Ohtani II, Shinno E, Aniya Y (2004). Inhibition of glutathione 

S-transferases  by  thonningianin  A,  isolated  from  the  African 

medicinal herb, Thonningia sanguinea, 

in vitro

 Food Chem. Toxicol. 

42: 1401-1408. 

Habig


 

WH, Pabst MJ, Jakoby WB (1974). Glutathione Stransferases the 

first  enzymatic  step  in  mercapturic  acid  formation.  J.  Biol.  Chem. 

249(22–25): 7130-7139. 

Haubruge

 

E,  Amichot  M  (1995).  Les  mecanismes  responsables  de  la 



resisitance aux insecticides chez les insects et les acariens BASE 2: 

161-174 


Jackai

 

LEN,  Daoust  RA  (1986).  Insect  pests  of  cowpea.  Annu.  Rev. 



Enthomol.  31: 91-115.  

Kawabata K, Yamamoto T, Hara A, Shimizu M, Yamada Y, Matsunaga 

K (2000). Modifying effects of ferulic acid on azoxymethane-induced 

colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats. Cancer Lett. 157(1): 15-21. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Kolawole

 

AO,  Ajele  JO  (2004).  Substrate  specifities  and  Inhibition 



studies  on  African  cat  fish  (

Clarias  gariepinus

)  liver  glutathione  s-

transferases. Glob. J. Pure  Appl.  Sci. 10(1): 179-182. 

Labeyire


 

V (1981). Vaincre la carence proteique par le developpement 

des  legumineuses  alimentaries  et  la  protection    de  leurs  recoltes 

contres les bruches. Food Bull. 3: 24-38. 

Lale

 

NES  (1992).  A  laboratory  study  of  the  comparative  toxicity  of 



products  from  the  three  species  of  the  Maize  weevil.  Postharvest 

Biol. Technol. 2: 612-664. 

Pullido R, Bravo L, Saura-Calixto F (2000). Antioxidant activity of dietary 

polyphenols as   determined  by  a  modified  ferric  reducing/ 

antioxidant power assay. J. Agric Food Chem.  48:  3396-3402. 

Singleton

 

VL,  Orthofer  R,  Lamuela-Raventos  RM  (1999).  Analysis  of 



total  phenols  and  other  oxidation  substrates  and  antioxidants  by 

means of Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Methods Enzymol.  299: 152-178 

Skerget M,  Kotnik P,  Hadolin M,  Hras A,  Simonic   M,  Knez  Z  (2005). 

Phenols,  proanthocyanidins,  flavones  and  flavonols  in  some  plant 

materials  and  their  antioxidant  activities.  Food  Chem.  89(2): 191-

198.  


Sofowora  A  (1993).  Phytochemical  screening  of  medicinal  plants  and 

traditional  medicine  in  Africa.  2nd  Edition  Spectrum  Books  Limited, 

Nigeria, pp. 150-156 

Zanden JJV, Geraets L, Wortelboer HM, Bladeren PJV, Rietjens IMCM, 

Cnubben  NHP  (2004).  Structural  requirements  for  the  flavonoid-

mediated  modulation  of  glutathione  Stransferase  P1-1  and  GS-X 

pump activity in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Biochem. Pharmacol.  67: 

1607-1617.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Yüklə 139,73 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə