An Anatomy of the Crude Oil Pricing System



Yüklə 1,86 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/13
tarix10.10.2019
ölçüsü1,86 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

 

 



 

 

An Anatomy of the Crude Oil Pricing  

System 

 

 



 

Bassam Fattouh

1

 

 

WPM 40 

 

January 2011 

                                                           

1

 Bassam Fattouh is the Director of the Oil and Middle East Programme at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies; 



Research  Fellow  at  St  Antony‟s  College,  Oxford  University;  and  Professor  of  Finance  and  Management  at  the 

School  of  Oriental  and  African  Studies,  University  of  London.  I  would  like  to  express  my  gratitude  to  Argus  for 

supplying  me  with  much of the data that underlie this research. I  would also like to thank Platts  for providing  me 

with the data for Figure 21 and CME Group for providing me with the data for Figure 13. The paper has benefited 

greatly  from  the  helpful  comments  of  Robert  Mabro  and  Christopher  Allsopp  and  many  commentators  who 

preferred  to  remain  anonymous  but  whose  comments  provided  a  major  source  of  information  for  this  study.  The 

paper also benefited from the comments received in seminars at the Department of Energy and Climate Change, UK, 

ENI, Milan and  Oxford Institute  for Energy Studies, Oxford. Finally, I  would  like to thank those individuals  who 

have  given  their  time  for  face-to-face  and/or  phone  interviews  and  have  been  willing  to  share  their  views  and 

expertise. Any remaining errors are my own.    



 

The contents of this paper are the authors’ sole responsibility. They do not 



necessarily represent the views of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies or any of its 

members.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2011 

Oxford Institute for Energy Studies 

(Registered Charity, No. 286084) 

 

 

This publication may be reproduced in part for educational or non-profit purposes without special 



permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgment of the source is made. No use of this 

publication may be made for resale or for any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior 

permission in writing from the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies. 

 

 



ISBN 

978-1-907555-20-6

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Contents



 

Summary Report ........................................................................................................................................... 6 

1. 

Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 11 



2. 

Historical Background to the International Oil Pricing System .......................................................... 14 

The Era of the Posted Price ..................................................................................................................... 14 

The Pricing System Shaken but Not Broken .......................................................................................... 14 

The Emergence of the OPEC Administered Pricing System .................................................................. 15 

The Consolidation of the OPEC Administered Pricing System .............................................................. 16 

The Genesis of the Crude Oil Market ..................................................................................................... 17 

The Collapse of the OPEC Administered Pricing System ...................................................................... 18 

3. 

The Market-Related Oil Pricing System and Formulae Pricing ......................................................... 20 



Spot Markets, Long-Term Contracts and Formula Pricing ..................................................................... 20 

Benchmarks in Formulae Pricing ............................................................................................................ 24 

4. 

Oil Price Reporting Agencies and the Price Discovery Process ......................................................... 30 



5. 

The Brent Market and Its Layers ........................................................................................................ 36 

The Physical Base of North Sea .............................................................................................................. 37 

The Layers and Financial Instruments of the Brent Market ................................................................... 39 

Data Issues .......................................................................................................................................... 39 

The Forward Brent .............................................................................................................................. 40 

The Brent Futures Market ................................................................................................................... 43 

The Exchange for Physicals ................................................................................................................ 44 

The Dated Brent/BFOE ....................................................................................................................... 45 

The Contract for Differences (CFDs) ................................................................................................. 45 

OTC Derivatives ................................................................................................................................. 48 

The Process of Oil Price Identification in the Brent Market ................................................................... 50 

6. 

The US Benchmarks ........................................................................................................................... 52 



The Physical Base for US Benchmarks .................................................................................................. 52 

The Layers and Financial Instruments of WTI ....................................................................................... 55 

The Price Discovery Process in the US Market ...................................................................................... 56 

WTI: The Broken Benchmark? ............................................................................................................... 58 

7. 

The Dubai-Oman Market .................................................................................................................... 61 



The Physical Base of Dubai and Oman .................................................................................................. 61 

The Financial Layers of Dubai................................................................................................................ 62 



 

The Price Discovery Process in the Dubai Market ................................................................................. 64 



Oman and its Financial Layers: A New Benchmark in the Making?...................................................... 66 

8. 


Assessment and Evaluation ................................................................................................................. 70 

Physical Liquidity of Benchmarks .......................................................................................................... 70 

Shifts in Global Oil Demand Dynamics and Benchmarks ...................................................................... 71 

The Nature of Players and the Oil Price Formation Process ................................................................... 73 

The Linkages between Physical Benchmarks and Financial Layers ....................................................... 74 

Adjustments in Price Differentials versus Price Levels .......................................................................... 74 

Transparency and Accuracy of Information ........................................................................................... 76 

9. 


Conclusions ......................................................................................................................................... 78 

References ................................................................................................................................................... 81 

 

List of Figures 

 

Figure 1: Price Differentials of Various Types of Saudi Arabia‟s Crude Oil to Asia in $/Barrel .............. 21 



Figure 2: Differentials of Term Prices between Saudi Arabia Light and Iran Light Destined to Asia (FOB) 

(In US cents) ............................................................................................................................................... 23 

Figure 3: Difference in Term Prices for Various Crude Oil Grades to the US Gulf (Delivered) and Asia 

(FOB) .......................................................................................................................................................... 24 

Figure 4: Price Differential between Dated Brent and BWAVE ($/Barrel) ............................................... 26 

Figure 5: Price Differential between WTI and ASCI ($/Barrel) (ASCI Price=0) ....................................... 26 

Figure 6: Brent Production by Company (cargoes per year), 2007 ............................................................ 37 

Figure 7: Falling output of BFO ................................................................................................................. 38 

Figure 8: Trading Volume and Number of Participants in the 21-Day BFOE Market ............................... 42 

Figure 9: Average Daily Volume and Open Interest of ICE Brent Futures Contract ................................. 44 

Figure 10: Pricing basis of Dated Brent Deals (1986-1991); Percentage of Total Deals ........................... 45 

Figure 11: Reported Trade on North Sea CFDs (b/d) ................................................................................. 46 

Figure 12: US PADDS ................................................................................................................................ 52 

Figure 13: Monthly averages of volumes traded of the Light Sweet Crude Oil Futures Contract ............. 55 

Figure 14:Liquidity at Different Segments of the Futures Curve (October 19, 2010) ................................ 56 

Figure 15: Spot Market Traded Volumes (b/d) (April 2009 Trade Month) ................................................ 57 

Figure 16: Spread between WTI 12-weeks Ahead and prompt WTI ($/Barrel) ......................................... 59 

Figure 17: WTI-BRENT Price Differential ($/Barrel)................................................................................ 60 

Figure 18: Dubai and Oman Crude Production Estimates (thousand barrels per day) ............................... 62 

Figure 19: Spread Deals as a Percentage of Total Number of Dubai Deals ............................................... 63 

Figure 20: Oman-Dubai Spread ($/Barrel) ................................................................................................. 64 

Figure 21: Dubai Partials Jan 2008 - Nov 2010 .......................................................................................... 65 

Figure 22: daily Volume of Traded DME Oman Crude Oil Futures Contract ........................................... 67 

Figure 23: Volume and Open Interest of the October 2010 Futures Contracts (Traded During Month of 

August) ........................................................................................................................................................ 68 


 

Figure 24: OECD and Non-OECD Oil Demand Dynamics ........................................................................ 71 



Figure 25: Change in Oil Trade Flow Dynamics ........................................................................................ 72 

Figure 26: The North Sea Dated differential to Ice Brent during the French Strike ................................... 76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Summary Report 

The  view  that  crude  oil  has  acquired  the  characteristics  of  financial  assets  such  as  stocks  or  bonds  has 

gained  wide  acceptance  among  many  observers.  However,  the  nature  of  „financialisation‟  and  its 

implications  are  not  yet  clear.  Discussions  and  analyses  of  „financialisation‟  of  oil  markets  have  partly 

been  subsumed  within  analyses  of  the  relation  between  finance  and  commodity  indices  which  include 

crude  oil.  The  elements  that  have  attracted  most  attention  have  been  outcomes:  correlations  between 

levels,  returns,  and  volatility  of  commodity  and  financial  indices.  However,  a  full  understanding  of  the 

degree of interaction between oil and finance requires, in addition, an analysis of interactions, causations 

and processes such as the investment and trading strategies of distinct types of financial participants; the 

financing  mechanisms  and  the  degree  of  leverage  supporting  those  strategies;  the  structure  of  oil 

derivatives markets; and most importantly the mechanisms that link the financial and physical layers of 

the oil market. 

Unlike  a  pure  financial  asset,  the  crude  oil  market  also  has  a  „physical‟  dimension  that  should  anchor 

prices  in  oil  market  fundamentals:  crude  oil  is  consumed,  stored  and  widely  traded  with  millions  of 

barrels being bought and sold every day at prices agreed by transacting parties. Thus, in principle, prices 

in the futures market through the process of arbitrage should eventually converge to the so-called „spot‟ 

prices in  the  physical  markets.  The  argument  then  goes  that since  physical trades  are  transacted at  spot 

prices, these prices should reflect existing supply-demand conditions.  

In  the  oil  market,  however,  the  story  is  more  complex.  The  „current‟  market  fundamentals  are  never 

known with certainty. The flow of data about oil market fundamentals is not instantaneous and is often 

subject  to  major  revisions  which  make  the  most  recent  available  data  highly  unreliable.  Furthermore, 

though many oil prices are observed on screens and reported through a variety of channels, it is important 

to explain what these different prices refer to. Thus, although the futures price often converges to a „spot‟ 

price, one should aim to analyse the process of convergence and understand what the „spot‟ price in the 

context of the oil market really means.  

Unfortunately, little attention has been devoted to such issues and the processes of price discovery in oil 

markets and the drivers of oil prices in the short-run remain under-researched. While this topic is linked to 

the current debate on the role of speculation versus fundamentals in the determination of the oil price, it 

goes  beyond  the  existing  debates  which  have  recently  dominated  policy  agendas.  This  report  offers  a 

fresh and deeper perspective on the current debate by identifying the various layers relevant to the price 

formation process and by examining and analysing the links between the financial and physical layers in 

the oil market, which lie at the heart of the current international oil pricing system. 

The  adoption  of  the  market-related  pricing  system  by  many  oil  exporters  in  1986-1988  opened  a  new 

chapter in the history of oil price formation. It represented a shift from a system in which prices were first 

administered by the large multinational oil companies in the 1950s and 1960s and then by OPEC for the 

period 1973-1988 to a system in which prices are set by „markets‟. First adopted by the Mexican national 

oil company PEMEX in 1986,  the market-related pricing system received wide acceptance among  most 

oil-exporting  countries.  By  1988,  it  became  and  still  is  the  main  method  for  pricing  crude  oil  in 

international trade after a short experimentation with a products-related pricing system in the shape of the 

netback pricing regime in the period 1986-1987. The oil market was ready for such a transition. The end 

of the concession system and the waves of nationalisation which disrupted oil supplies to multinational oil 

companies  established  the  basis  of  arm‟s-length  deals  and  exchange  outside  the  vertically  and 

horizontally  integrated  multinational  companies.  The  emergence  of  many  suppliers  outside  OPEC  and 

many buyers further increased the prevalence of such arm‟s-length deals. This led to the development of a 

complex  structure  of  interlinked  oil  markets  which  consist  of  spot  and  also  physical  forwards,  futures, 

options and other derivative markets referred to as paper markets. Technological innovations which made 

electronic trading possible revolutionised these markets by allowing 24-hour trading from any place in the 



 

world. It also opened access to a wider set of market participants and allowed the development of a large 



number of trading instruments both on regulated exchanges and over the counter. 

Physical  delivery  of  crude  oil  is  organised  either  through  the  spot  (cash)  market  or  through  long-term 

contracts.  The  spot  market  is  used  by  transacting  parties  to  buy  and  sell  crude  oil  not  covered  by  long 

term  contractual  arrangements  and  applies  often  to  one-off  transactions.  Given  the  logistics  of 

transporting  oil,  spot  cargoes  for  immediate  delivery  are  rare.  Instead,  there  is  an  important  element  of 

forwardness  in  spot  transactions.  The  parties  can  either  agree  on  the  price  at  the  time  of  agreement,  in 

which case the sport transaction becomes closer to a „forward‟ contract. More often though, transacting 

parties link the pricing of an oil cargo to the time of loading. 

Long-term contracts are negotiated bilaterally between buyers and sellers for the delivery of a series of oil 

shipments over a specified period of time, usually one or two years. They specify among other things, the 

volumes of crude oil to be delivered, the delivery schedule, the actions to be taken in case of default, and 

above all the method that should be used in calculating the price of an oil shipment. Price agreements are 

usually  concluded  on  the  method  of  formula  pricing  which  links  the  price  of  a  cargo  in  long-term 

contracts to a market (spot) price. Formula pricing has become the basis of the oil pricing system.   

Formula pricing has two main advantages. Crude oil is not a homogenous commodity. There are various 

types of internationally traded crude oil with different qualities and characteristics which have a bearing 

on refining yields. Thus, different crudes fetch different prices. Given the large variety of crude oils, the 

price of a particular type is usually set at a discount or at a premium to marker or reference prices, often 

referred to as benchmarks. The differentials are adjusted periodically to reflect differences in the quality 

of crudes as well as the relative demand and supply of the various types of crudes.  Another advantage of 

formula  pricing  is  that  it  increases  pricing  flexibility.  When  there  is  a  lag  between  the  date  at  which  a 

cargo is bought and the date of arrival at its destination, there is a price risk. Transacting parties usually 

share  this risk  through  the pricing  formula.  Agreements  are  often  made  for  the  date  of  pricing  to  occur 

around the delivery date.  

At the heart of formulae pricing is the identification of the price of key „physical‟ benchmarks, such as 

West  Texas  Intermediate  (WTI),  Dated  Brent  and  Dubai-Oman.  The  benchmark  crudes  are  a  central 

feature of the oil pricing system and are used by oil companies and traders to price cargoes under long-

term  contracts  or  in  spot  market  transactions;  by  futures  exchanges  for  the  settlement  of  their  financial 

contracts;  by  banks  and  companies  for  the  settlement  of  derivative  instruments  such  as  swap  contracts; 

and by governments for taxation purposes. 

Few features of these physical benchmarks stand out. Markets with relatively low volumes of production 

such as WTI, Brent, and Dubai set the price for markets with higher volumes of production elsewhere in 

the  world.  Despite  the  high  level  of  volumes  of  production  in  the  Gulf,  these  markets  remain  illiquid: 

there  is  limited  spot  trading  in  these  markets,  no  forwards  or  swaps  (apart  from  Dubai),  and  no  liquid 

futures market since crude export contracts include destination and resale restrictions which limit trading 

options. While the volume of production is not a sufficient condition for the emergence of a benchmark, it 

is  a  necessary  condition  for  a  benchmark‟s  success.  As  markets  become  thinner  and  thinner,  the  price 

discovery  process  becomes  more  difficult.  Oil  price  reporting  agencies  cannot  observe  enough  genuine 

arms-length deals. Furthermore, in thin markets, the danger of squeezes and distortions increases and as a 

result  prices  could  then  become  less  informative  and  more  volatile  thereby  distorting  consumption  and 

production decisions. So far the low and continuous decline in the physical base of existing benchmarks 

has  been  counteracted  by  including  additional  crude  streams  in  an  assessed  benchmark.  This  had  the 

effect of reducing the chance of squeezes as these alternative crudes could be used for delivery against the 

contract. Although such short-term solutions have been successful in alleviating the problem of squeezes, 

observers  should  not  be  distracted  from  some  key  questions:  What  are  the  conditions  necessary  for  the 

emergence  of  successful  benchmarks  in  the  most  physically  liquid  market?  Would  a  shift  to  assessing 



 

price  in  these  markets  improve  the  price  discovery  process?  Such  key  questions  remain  heavily  under-



researched in the energy literature and do not feature in the consumer-producer dialogue.  

The emergence of the non-OECD as the main source of growth in global oil demand will only increase 

the importance of such questions. One of the most important shifts in oil market dynamics in recent years 

has been the shift in oil trade flows to Asia: this may have long-term implications on pricing benchmarks. 

Questions are already being raised whether Dubai still constitutes an appropriate benchmark for pricing 

crude oil  exports  to  Asia  given  its thin  physical  base or  whether  new  benchmarks  are  needed  to reflect 

more accurately the recent shift in trade flows and the rise in prominence of the Asian consumer.  

Unlike  the  futures  market  where  prices  are  observable  in  real  time,  the  reported  prices  of  physical 

benchmarks are „identified‟ or „assessed‟ prices. Assessments are needed in opaque markets such as crude 

oil  where  physical  transactions  concluded  between  parties  cannot  be  directly  observed  by  outsiders. 

Assessments are also needed in illiquid markets where there are not enough representative deals or where 

no  transactions  are  concluded.  These  assessments  are  carried  out  by  oil  pricing  reporting  agencies 

(PRAs), the two most important of which are Platts and Argus. While PRAs have been an integral part of 

the oil  pricing  system,  especially  since the  shift to the  market-related  pricing  system  in  1986,  their role 

has recently been attracting considerable attention. In the G20 summit in Korea in November 2010, the 

G20  leaders  called  for  a  more  detailed  analysis  on  „how  the  oil  spot  market  prices  are  assessed  by  oil 

price reporting agencies and how this affects the transparency and functioning of oil markets‟. In its latest 

report in November 2010, IOSCO points that „the core concern with respect to price reporting agencies is 

the extent to which the reported data accurately reflects the cash market in question‟.  PRAs do not only 

act as „a mirror to the trade‟.  In their attempt to identify the price that reflects accurately the market value 

of  an  oil  barrel,  PRAs  enter  into  the  decision-making  territory  which  can  influence  market  structure.  

What  they  choose  to  do  is  influenced  by  market  participants  and  market  structure  while  they  in  turn 

influence  the  trading  strategies  of  the  various  participants.  New  markets  and  contracts  may  emerge  to 

hedge the risks arising from some PRAs‟ decisions. To evaluate the role of PRAs in the oil market, it is 

important to look at three inter-related dimensions: the methodology used in indentifying the oil price; the 

accuracy of price assessments; and the internal measures that PRAs implement to protect the integrity and 

ensure an efficient assessment process. There is a fundamental difference in the methodology and in the 

philosophy  underlying  the  price  assessment  process  between  the  various  PRAs.  As  a  result,  different 

agencies  may  produce  different  prices  for  the  same  benchmark.  This  raises  the  issue  of  which  method 

produces a more accurate price assessment. Given that assessed prices underlie long-term contracts, spot 

transactions and derivatives instruments, even small differences in price assessments between PRAs have 

important implications on exporters‟ revenues and financial flows between parties in financial contracts.  

In  the  last  two  decades  or  so,  many  financial  layers  (paper  markets)  have  emerged  around  crude  oil 

benchmarks. They include the forward market (in Brent and Dubai), swaps, futures, and options. Some of 

the  instruments  such  as  futures  and  options  are  traded  on  regulated  exchanges  such  as  ICE  and  CME 

Group, while other instruments, such as swaps, options and forward contracts, are traded bilaterally over 

the  counter  (OTC).  Nevertheless,  these  financial  layers  are  highly  interlinked  through  the  process  of 

arbitrage and the development of instruments that links the various layers together. Over the years, these 

markets have grown in terms of size, liquidity, sophistication and have attracted a diverse set of players 

both physical and financial. These markets have become central for market participants wishing to hedge 

their  risk  and  to  bet  on  oil  price  movements.  Equally  important,  these  financial  layers  have  become 

central to the oil price identification process. 

At  the  early  stages  of  the  current  pricing  system,  linking  prices  to  benchmarks  in  formulae  pricing 

provided  producers  and  consumers  with  a  sense  of  comfort  that  the  price  is  grounded  in  the  physical 

dimension of the market. This implicitly assumes that the process of identifying the price of benchmarks 

can be isolated from financial layers. However, this is far from reality. The analysis in this report shows 

that the different layers of the oil market form a complex web of links, all of which play a role in the price 

discovery  process.  The  information  derived  from  financial  layers  is  essential  for  identifying  the  price 



 

level of the benchmark. In the Brent market, the oil price in the forward market is sometimes priced as a 



differential to the price of the Brent futures contract using the Exchange for Physicals (EFP) market. The 

price of Dated Brent or North Sea Dated in turn is priced as a differential to the forward market through 

the  market  of  Contract  for  Differences  (CFDs),  another  swaps  market.  Given  the  limited  number  of 

physical  transactions  and  hence  the  limited  amount  of  deals  that  can  be  observed  by  oil  reporting 

agencies, the value of Dubai, the main benchmark used for pricing crude oil exports to East Asia, is often 

assessed by using the value of differentials in the very liquid OTC Dubai/Brent swaps market. Thus, one 

could  argue  that  without  these  financial  layers  it  would  not  be  possible  to  „discover‟  or  „identify‟  oil 

prices  in  the  current  oil  pricing  system.    In  effect,  crude  oil  prices  are  jointly  or  co-determined  in  both 

layers, depending on differences in timing, location and quality of crude oil. 

Since  physical  benchmarks  constitute  the  pricing  basis  of  the  large  majority  of  physical  transactions, 

some  observers  claim  that  derivatives  instruments  such  as  futures,  forwards,  options  and  swaps  derive 

their  value  from  the  price  of  these  physical  benchmarks,  i.e.,  the  prices  of  these  physical  benchmarks 

drive  the  prices  in  paper  markets.  However,  this  is  a  gross  over-simplification  and  does  not  accurately 

reflect the process of crude oil price formation. The issue of whether the paper market drives the physical 

or  the  other  way  around  is  difficult  to  construct  theoretically  and  test  empirically  and  requires  further 

research.  

The  report  also  calls  for  broadening  the  empirical  research  to  include  the  trading  strategies  of  physical 

players.  In  recent  years,  the  futures  markets  have  attracted  a  wide  range  of  financial  players  including 

swap  dealers,  pension  funds,  hedge  funds,  index  investors,  technical  traders,  and  high  net  worth 

individuals. There are concerns that these financial players and their trading strategies could move the oil 

price  away  from  the  „true‟  underlying  fundamentals. The fact  remains  however that  the  participants  in 

many  of  the  OTC  markets  such  as  forward  markets  and  CFDs  which  are  central  to  the  price  discovery 

process  are  mainly  „physical‟  and  include  entities  such  as  refineries,  oil  companies,  downstream 

consumers,  physical  traders,  and  market  makers.  Financial  players  such  as  pension  funds  and  index 

investors have limited presence in many of these markets. Thus, any analysis limited to non-commercial 

participants in the futures market and their role in the oil price formation process is incomplete and also 

potentially misleading. 

The  report  also  makes  the  distinction  between  trade  in  price  differentials  and  trade  in  price  levels.  It 

shows  that  trades  in  the  levels  of  the  oil  price  rarely  take  place  in  the  layers  surrounding  the  physical 

benchmarks.  We  postulate  that  the  price  level  of  the  main  crude  oil  benchmarks  is  set  in  the  futures 

markets; the financial layers such as swaps and forwards set the price differentials depending on quality, 

location and timing. These differentials are then used by oil reporting agencies to identify the price level 

of  a  physical  benchmark.  If  the  price  in  the  futures  market  becomes  detached  from  the  underlying 

benchmark, the differentials adjust to correct for this divergence through a web of highly interlinked and 

efficient  markets.  Thus,  our  analysis  reveals  that  the  level  of  the  crude  oil  price,  which  consumers, 

producers and their governments are most concerned with, is not the most relevant feature in the current 

pricing system. Instead, the identification of price differentials and the adjustments in these differentials 

in  the  various  layers  underlie the  basis  of the  current  crude  oil  pricing  system.  By  trading  differentials, 

market  participants  limit  their  exposure  to  the  risks  of  time,  location  grade  and  volume.  Unfortunately, 

this fact has received little attention and the issue of whether price differentials between different markets 

showed strong signs of adjustment in the 2008-2009 price cycle has not yet received due attention in the 

empirical literature.  

But this leaves us with a fundamental question: what determines the price level of a certain benchmark in 

the  first  place?  The  pricing  system  reflects  how  the  oil  market  functions:  if  price  levels  are  set  in  the 

futures  market  and  if  market  participants  in  these  markets  attach  more  weight  to  future  fundamentals 

rather  than  current  fundamentals  and/or  if  market  participants  expect  limited  feedbacks  from  both  the 



10 

 

supply  and  demand  side  in  response  to  oil  price  changes,  these  expectations  will  be  reflected  in  the 



different layers and will ultimately be reflected in the assessed spot price of a certain benchmark.  

The  current  oil  pricing  system  has  survived  for  almost  a  quarter  of  a  century,  longer  than  the  OPEC 

administered system. While some of the details have changed, such as Saudi Arabia‟s decision to replace 

Dated Brent with Brent futures in pricing its exports to Europe and the more recent move to replace WTI 

with Argus Sour Crude Index (ASCI) in pricing its exports to the US, these changes are rather cosmetic. 

The fundamentals of the current pricing system have remained the same since the mid 1980s: the price of 

oil is set by the „market‟ with PRAs making use of various methodologies to reflect the market price in 

their  assessments  and  making  use  of  information  in  the  financial  layers  surrounding  the  global 

benchmarks.  In  the  light  of  the  2008-2009  price  swings,  the  oil  pricing  system  has  received  some 

criticism  reflecting  the  unease  that  some  observers  feel  with  the  current  system.  Although  alternative 

pricing  systems  could  be  devised  such  as  bringing  back  the  administered  pricing  system  or  calling  for 

producers  to  assume  a  greater  responsibility  in  the  method  of  price  formation  by  removing  destination 

restrictions  on  their  exports,  or  allowing  their  crudes  to  be  auctioned,  the  reality  remains  that  the  main 

market  players  such  as  oil  companies,  refineries,  oil  exporting  countries,  physical  traders  and  financial 

players have no interest in rocking the boat. Market players and governments get very concerned about oil 

price behaviour and its global and local impacts, but so far have showed much less interest in the pricing 

system and market structure that signalled such price behaviour in the first place.

 

 



 

11 

 

1. Introduction



 

The  adoption  of  the  market-related  pricing  system  by  many  oil  exporters  in  1986-1988  opened  a  new 

chapter in the history of oil price formation. It represented a shift from a system in which prices were first 

administered by the large multinational oil companies in the 1950s and 1960s and then by OPEC for the 

period  1973-1988  to  a  system  in  which  prices  are  set  by  „markets‟.  But  what  is  really  meant  by  the 

„market price‟ or the „spot price‟ of crude oil?  

The  concept  of  the  „market  price‟  of  oil  associated  with  the  current  pricing  regime  has  often  been 

surrounded  with  confusion.  Crude  oil  is  not  a  homogenous  commodity.  There  are  various  types  of 

internationally  traded  crude  oil  with  different  qualities  and  characteristics  which  have  a  bearing  on 

refining  yields.  Thus,  different  crudes  fetch  different  prices.  In  the  current  system,  the  prices  of  these 

crudes  are  usually  set  at  a  discount  or  a  premium  to  a  benchmark  or  reference  price  according  to  their 

quality  and  their  relative  supply  and demand.  However, this raises  a series  of  questions.  How  are these 

price  differentials  set?  More  importantly,  how  is  the  price  of  the  benchmark  or  reference  crude 

determined? 

A  simple  answer  to  the  latter  question  would  be  „the  market‟  and  the  forces  of  supply  and  demand  for 

these  benchmark  crudes.  But  this  raises  additional  questions.  What  are  the  main  features  of  the  spot 

physical  markets  for  these  benchmarks?  Do  these  markets  have  enough  liquidity  to  ensure  an  efficient 

price discovery process? What are the roles of the various financial layers such as the futures markets and 

other  derivatives-based  instruments  that  have  emerged  around  the  physical  benchmarks?  Do  these 

financial  layers  enhance  or  hamper  the  price  discovery  function?  Does  the  distinction  between  the 

different  layers  of  the  market  matter  or  have  the  different  layers  become  so  inter-linked  that  the 

distinction  is  no  longer  meaningful?  And  if  the  distinction  does  matter,  what  do  prices  in  different 

markets reflect?  It is clear from all these questions that the concept of „market price‟ needs to be defined 

more precisely. The argument that the market determines the oil price has little explanatory power. 

The above questions have assumed special importance in the last few years. The sharp swings in oil prices 

and the marked increase in volatility during the latest 2008-2009 price cycle have raised concerns about 

the impact  of  financial layers and financial  investors  on  oil  price  behaviour.

2

  Some  observers in the  oil 



industry and in academic institutions attribute the recent behaviour in prices to structural transformations 

in the oil market. According to this view, the boom in oil prices can be explained in terms of tightened 

market fundamentals, rigidities in the oil industry due to long periods of underinvestment, and structural 

changes in the behaviour of key players such  as non-OPEC suppliers, OPEC members, and non-OECD 

consumers.

3

  On  the  other  hand,  other  observers  consider  that  the  changes  in  fundamentals  or  even  in 



expectations, have not been sufficiently dramatic to justify the extreme cycles in oil prices over the period 

2008-2009.  Instead,  the  oil  market  is  seen  as  having  been  distorted  by  substantial  and  volatile flows  of 

financial investments in deregulated or poorly regulated crude oil derivatives instruments.

4

  



The  view  that  crude  oil  has  acquired  the  characteristics  of  financial  assets  such  as  stocks  or  bonds  has 

gained  wide  acceptance  among  many  observers  but  is  disputed  by  others.

5

  Many  empirical  papers 



                                                           

2

 For a comprehensive overview, see Fattouh (2009). 



3

 See, for instance, IMF (2008), World Economic Outlook (October), Washington: International Monetary Fund; 

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (2008), Interagency Task Force on Commodity Markets Interim Report 

on Crude Oil; Killian and Murphy (2010). 

   

4

 See, for instance, the Testimony of Michael Greenberger before the Commodity Futures Trading Commission on 



Excessive Speculation: Position Limits and Exemptions, 5 August 2009. Greenberger provides an extensive list of 

studies that are in favour of the speculation view.   

5

 See, for instance, Yergin (2009). Yergin argues that the excessive „daily trading has helped turn oil into something 



new -- not only a physical commodity critical to the security and economic viability of nations but also a financial 

asset, part of that great instantaneous exchange of stocks, bonds, currencies, and everything else that makes up the 

world's financial portfolio‟.

   


12 

 

examine  whether  the  price  behaviour  of  commodities  mimics  that  of  financial  assets  and  whether 



commodity  and  equity  prices  have  become  increasingly  correlated.

6

  However,  the  nature  of 



„financialisation‟  and  its  implications  are  not  yet  clear  in  these  studies.  Discussions  and  analyses  of 

„financialisation‟  of  oil  markets  have  partly  been  subsumed  within  analyses  of  the  relation  between 

finance and commodity indices which include crude oil. The elements that have attracted most attention 

have  been  outcomes:  correlations  between  levels,  returns,  and  volatility  of  commodity  and  financial 

indices.  However,  a full understanding  of  the  degree  of interaction  between  oil  and finance  requires,  in 

addition,  an  analysis  of  interactions,  causations  and  processes  such  as  the  investment  and  trading 

strategies of distinct types of financial participants; the financing mechanisms and the degree of leverage 

supporting those strategies; the structure of oil derivatives markets; and most importantly the mechanisms 

that link the financial and physical layers of the oil market. 

One important aspect of „financialisation‟ often highlighted is the increasing role that expectations play in 

the  pricing  of  crude  oil.  In  the  case  of  equities,  pricing  is  based  on  expectations  of  a  firm‟s  future 

earnings. In the oil market, expectations of future market fundamentals have increasingly been playing an 

important  role  in  oil  pricing.  According  to  some  observers,  if  there  is  large  uncertainty  as  to  what  the 

long-term oil market fundamentals are, or if perceptions of these fundamentals are highly exaggerated and 

inflated, then the oil price in the futures market can diverge away from its true underlying fundamental 

value causing an oil price bubble.

7

  

However, unlike a pure financial asset, the crude oil market also  has a „physical‟ dimension that should 



anchor  these  expectations  in  oil  market  fundamentals:  crude  oil  is  consumed,  stored  and  widely  traded 

with millions of barrels being bought and sold every day at prices agreed by transacting parties. Thus, in 

principle, prices in the futures market through the process of arbitrage should eventually converge to the 

so-called  „spot‟  prices  in  the  physical  markets.  The  argument  then  goes  that  since  physical  deals  are 

transacted at spot prices, these prices reflect existing supply-demand conditions.  

In the oil market, however, the story is more complex. To begin with, the „current‟ market fundamentals 

are never known with certainty. The flow of data about oil market fundamentals is not instantaneous and 

is  often  subject  to  major  revisions  which  make  the  most  recent  available  data  highly  unreliable.  More 

importantly for this paper, though many oil prices are observed on screens and reported through a variety 

of  channels,  it  is  important  to  understand  what  these  different  prices  really  mean.  Thus,  although  the 

futures price often converges to a „spot‟ price, it is important to analyse the process of convergence and 

understand what the „spot‟ price really means in the context of the oil market.  

Unfortunately,  little  attention  has  been  devoted  to  such  issues  and  the  processes  of  price  discovery  and 

price  formation  in  oil  markets  remain  under-researched.  While  this  topic  can  be  linked  to  the  current 

debate on the role of speculation versus fundamentals in the determination of oil prices, it goes beyond 

the existing debates which have recently dominated policy agendas. This paper offers a fresh and deeper 

perspective on the current debate by analysing how oil prices are discovered in the current international 

pricing  system,  by  identifying  the  various  layers  relevant  for  the  price  formation  process  and  by 

                                                           

6

  See,  for  instance,  Tang  and  Xiong  (2010)  who  find  that  commodity  prices  (more  specifically  the  commodity 



indices  GSCI  and  DJ-UBS),  world  equity  indices,  and  the  US  dollar  have  become  increasingly  correlated. 

Silvennoinen  and  Thorp  (2010)  also  find  an  increasing  degree  of  integration  between  commodities  and  financial 

markets  especially  since  the  late  1990s.  They  find  that  factors  such  as  lower  interest  rates  and  corporate  bond 

spreads, US dollar depreciations and financial traders‟ open positions can explain commodity returns‟ volatility. In 

contrast, Büyükşahin, Haig and Robe (2010) find that the relation between commodity and US equity returns did not 

witness any significant change in the last decade or so. This even applies to periods when markets have witnessed 

extreme returns. Gorton and Rouwenhorst (2004) find that commodity futures returns are negatively correlated with 

equity returns and bond returns. This can be explained in terms of the different behaviour of commodities and other 

asset classes over the business cycle.  

7

 See, for instance, Jalali-Naini (2009).   



13 

 

examining and analysing the links between the financial and physical layers in the oil market, which lie at 



the heart of the current international oil pricing system. 

The main purposes of this paper are to analyse the main features of the current crude oil pricing system; 

to describe the structure of the main benchmarks currently used namely Brent, West Texas Intermediate 

(WTI) and Dubai-Oman; to clearly identify the various financial layers that have emerged around these 

physical benchmarks; to analyse the links between the different financial layers and between the financial 

layers  and  the  physical benchmarks;  and  then to  evaluate  how these  links  influence the  price  discovery 

and oil price formation process in the crude oil market. The paper is divided into seven sections. Section 2 

provides  a  historical  background  to  the  current  international  pricing  regime  analysing  the  major 

transformations in the oil market during the last 50 years or so, and the different pricing systems that have 

been  associated  with  the  various  market  structures.  Section  3  discusses  the  main  features  of the  pricing 

formulae that constitute the basis of the market-related crude oil pricing system. Section 4 discusses the 

role  of  oil  pricing  reporting  agencies  in  the  current  oil  pricing  system.  Sections  5,  6  and  7  analyse  the 

three widely used benchmarks in the international oil pricing system Brent,  WTI and Dubai, describing 

their  physical  base,  and  analysing  the  financial  layers  that  have  emerged  around  these  physical 

benchmarks.  Section  8  evaluates  the  links  between  the  physical  benchmarks  and  financial  layers  and 

draws the main implications on the oil price formation process. The last section offers some conclusions.    



Yüklə 1,86 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə