An outline of plant diversity in the andaman and nicobar islands



Yüklə 3,35 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü3,35 Mb.

AN OUTLINE OF PLANT DIVERSITY IN THE ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR ISLANDS 

W. Arisdason & P. Lakshminarasimhan 

Central National Herbarium, Botanical Survey of India, Howrah. 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are the Union Territory and the largest archipelago system in the Bay 

of Bengal, consisting of 306 islands and 206 rocks and rock outcrops (islets) and situated between 6°45'–

13°41' N and 92°12'–93°57' E, covering 8,249 km

2

 geographical area with a coastline of 1,962 km. The 



terrain  of  Andaman  Islands  (part  of  Indo-Burma  Biodiversity  Hotspot)  that  has  been  formed  from  the 

fragments of a continental land mass is in contrast to the Nicobar Islands (part of Sundaland Biodiversity 

Hotspot),  which  were  formed  due  to  volcanic  activity.  These  are  lying  in  North-South  direction  and 

simulating an arc stretching over a length of about 912 km and maximum width of 57 km.  

 

The Andaman group of islands is having a total area of 6,408 km



2

, comprising a total length of 467 km 

and width of 52 km, while Nicobar group of Islands are having an area of 1,841 km

2

 (length 259 km and 



width 58 km). This large archipelago is separated from mainland India by about 1000 km (from Chennai 

by sea 1190 km and by air 1330 km and Kolkata 1255 km by sea and 1303 km by air). The nearest 

landmass in the north is Myanmar, roughly 280 km north of Landfall Island – the northern most Island in the 

Andaman Group. The closest landmass to the Great Nicobar Island is Sumatra, about 145 km south. The 

Saddle  Peak  (about  720  m)  and  Mt.  Thullier  (about  670  m)  are  the  only  two  highest  peaks  in  the 

Andaman and the Nicobar group of Islands, respectively.   

 

There  are  six  aboriginal  groups,  viz.  Great  Andamanese,  Onges,  Jarawas,  Sentinelese,  Nicobarese  and 



Shompens,  of  which  the  first  four  are  Negrito  hunter-gatherers  inhabiting  some  of  the  Andaman  Islands 

while the last two are of Mongoloid race and live in Nicobar Islands. These aboriginal people widely use 

plants in day to day sustenance. 

 

 



 

CLIMATE 

As these Islands are situated in the equatorial belt and are exposed to marine impacts having warm and 

humid tropical climate with the temperature ranging between 18°C and 35°C. The islands receive heavy 

rainfall from both Southwest and Northeast monsoons, the former is from May to September and the latter 

is from October to December with the average annual rainfall ranging from 300 to 3500 mm. Cyclonic 

winds accompanied by thunder and lightning are very frequent here. During January to March a fairly dry 

weather with scanty rainfall occurs. The mean relative humidity is rather high and usually remains between 

66 and 85% throughout the year.  

 

VEGETATION AND PLANT DIVERSITY OF ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR ISALNDS 

Kurz  (1870)  published  a  “Report  on  the  vegetation  of  the  Andaman  Islands”,  in  which  he  outlined  the 

various  vegetation  types,  influence  of  the  season  upon  the  vegetation  and  peculiarities  of  flora  of  the 

Andaman Islands. According to Champion & Seth (1963), the vegetation of union territory may be broadly 

classified  into  (i)  Beach  forests,  (ii)  Mangrove  forests,  (iii)  Wet  evergreen  forests,  (iv)  Semi-evergreen 

forests,  (v)  Moist  deciduous  forests  and  (vi)  Grasslands.  Some  of  the  predominant  components  of  these 

forests are Baccaurea spp., Brueguirea spp., Calamus spp., Canarium spp., Ceriopsis spp., Clerodendron 

spp.,  Dipterocarpus  spp.,  Leea  spp.,  Mallotus  spp.,  Mangifera  spp.,  Rhizophora  spp.  and  Thuarea 



involuta

 

Parkinson (1923) published “A forest flora of the Andaman Islands” providing a taxonomic account of the 



trees,  shrubs  and  principal  climbers  of  the  Islands.  Later,  checklists  and  supplements  or  additions  to 

checklists  of  plants  of  Andaman  and  Nicobar  Islands  were  published  by  many  (Vasudeva  Rao,  1986; 

Lakshminarasimhan  &  Rao,  1996;  Mathew,  1998;  Dagar  &  Singh,  1999).  Recently,  Pandey  &  Diwakar 

(2008)  published  an  integrated  check-list  flora  of  Andaman  and  Nicobar  Islands,  which  reports  2654, 

including 228 infraspecific taxa under 1083 genera in 237 families belonging to 4 different plant groups, 

namely  bryophytes,  pteridophytes,  gymnosperms  and  angiosperms.  However,  a  recent  analysis  reveals 

that the Andaman and Nicobar Islands harbours a total of 2662 plant taxa, comprising 2519 species, 33 

subspecies,  104  varieties  and  6  forma  under  1110  genera  in  238  families  belonging  to  bryophytes, 



pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms (Murugan & al. in ed.). Bryophytes are represented by 58 

species and 3 varieties, under 32 genera and 16 families (Lal, 2005). Pteridophytes are consisting of 129 

species,  1  subspecies  and  9  varieties  under  62  genera  belonging  to  38  families  (Dixit  &  Sinha,  2001). 

Gymnosperms are represented by 7 species and 2 varieties under 4 genera and 3 families. Besides, the 

Islands also harbour 383 species of lichens under 84 genera and 30 families, and algae are represented 

by 182 species belonging to 84 genera in 32 families.     

 

Angiosperms are the predominant plant group in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands; they are represented 



by 2314 species, 31 subspecies, 89 varieties and 6 forma under 1011 genera in 181 families, constituting 

92% of entire flora of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Poaceae (194 taxa), Orchidaceae (153 taxa), 

Rubiaceae (143 taxa), Euphorbiaceae (135 taxa), Fabaceae s.str. (110 taxa), Cyperaceae (106 taxa), 

Annonaceae (64 taxa), Moraceae (63 taxa), Asteraceae (49 taxa) and Arecaceae (46 taxa) are the top 

ten dominant families.  

 

DIVERSITY OF ENDEMIC AND THREATENED PLANTS  

Only 3 genera, namely NicobariodendronPseudodiplospora and Sphyranthera and about 315 species 

belonging to 187 genera and 74 families are endemic to the union territory,

 

constituting about 10% of the 



flora  (Singh  &  al.,  2014);  some  of  them  are  Anoectochilus  narasimhanii,  Ceropegia  andamanica, 

Codiocarpus andamanicus, Cyrtandromoea nicobarica, Grewia indandamanica, Hippocratea grahamii, 

Leea  grandifolia,  Mangifera  nicobarica,  Memecylon  andamanicum,  Mesua  manii,  Miliusa 

andamanica,  Ophiorrhiza  infundibularis,  Pterocarpus  dalbergioides,  Salacia  nicobarica,  Sonerila 

andamanensis, Sphaeropteris albo-setacea and Vernonia andamanica. 

 

The flora of Andaman and Nicobar Islands also consists of considerable number of threatened taxa. About 



112  threatened  vascular  plant  species  under  74  genera  and  38  families  have  been  recorded  from  the 

islands  (Singh  &  al.,  2014).  Dendrobium  tenuicaule,  Eulophia  nicobarica,  Ginalloa  andamanica



Malleola  andamanica,  Taeniophyllum  andamanicum  and  Wendlandia  andamanica  are  some  of  the 

endangered  taxa  found  in  the  Islands.  Cryptocarya  ferrea  var.  ferrarsi,  Garcinia  cadelliana,  Garcinia 



kingii,  Mesua  manii,  Neonauclea  gageana,  Prismatomeris  fragrans  subsp.  andamanica,  Psychotria 

pendulaStephania andamanica and Syzygium andamanicum are known only by their type collection. 

Sphaeropteris  albo-setacea  and  Sphaeropteris  nicobarica  are  categorised  under  Appendix  II  List  of 

CITES.  Amorphophallus  longistylus,    Amorphophallus  muelleri,  Artabotrys  nicobarianus,  Bentinckia 



nicobarica,  Calamus  dilaceratus,  Corypha  utan,  Drypetes  andamanica,  Ficus  andamanica

Gomphandra comosaHabenaria andamanicaKorthalsia rogersiiMitrephora andamanicaPinanga 

andamanensis,  Pseuduvaria  prainii,  Psychotria  andamanica,  Scutellaria  andamanica,  Syzygium 

maniiUvaria nicobarica and Vernonia andamanica are found to be rare in the islands.  

 

DIVERSITY OF ECONOMICALLY IMPORTANT PLANTS 

The  islands  also  harbour  a  number  of  economically  important  plant  species.  There  are  about  300  non-

indigenous or cultivated species. Some of them are Abrus precatoriusAristolochia tagalaBarringtonia 

asiatica,  Barringtonia  racemosa,  Bruguiera  gymnorrhiza,  Colubrina  asiatica,  Cordia  grandis

Duabanga  grandiflora,  Flagellaria  indica,  Garuga  pinnata,  Horsfieldia  glabra,  Leea  grandifolia

Manilkara  littoralis,  Morinda  citrifolia,  Myristica  andamanica,  Orophea  katschallica,  Psychotria 

andamanica,  Scaevola  taccada,  Xanthophyllum  andamanicum,  Ximenia  americana  and  Zingiber 

zerumbet.  The  predominant  timber-yielding  tree  species  in  the  islands  are  Pterocarpus  dalbergioides

Dipterocarpus  griffithii,  Diospyros  marmorata,  Lagerstroemia  hypoleuca,  Terminalia  bialata  and 

Tetrameles nudiflora

 

THREATS TO THE PLANT DIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION STRATEGIES 

Natural disasters and anthropogenic activities are the two major threats, which pose considerable damage 

to the plant diversity of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Tsunami, cyclones and forest fire are the natural 

disasters  that  cause  severe  destruction  and  loss  of  natural  habitats  in  the  islands.  Conversion  of  forest 

areas  into  agricultural  fields  and  residential  areas,  over-exploitation  of  biological  resources  and 

introduction  of  alien  species  are  the  major  anthropogenic  activities  that  cause  destruction  and 

fragmentation  of  natural  habitats.  Climate  change  will  also  pose  potential  impact  on  the  biodiversity  of 

these Islands. 

  


Many  Protected  Areas  have  been  established  in  the  Union  Territory  to  conserve  the  existing  floral  and 

faunal diversity of the islands. There are 9 National Parks and 96 Wildlife Sanctuaries in in Andaman and 

Nicobar  Islands  (ENVIS-WII,  2012).  National  Parks  occupy  an  area  of  1153.94  km

2

  and  constitute 



13.99%  of  the  total  geographical  area  of  the  Union  Territory;  seven  of  them  are  found  in  Andaman 

Islands  and  two  in  Nicobar  Islands.  Wildlife  Sanctuaries  occupy  an  area  of  389.39  km

2

,  which  cover 



4.72% of the total geographic area, of which 92 are in Andaman Islands and 4 in Nicobar Islands. Great 

Nicobar is the only Biosphere Reserve in the Islands that covers an area of about 885 km

2

. These Protected 



Areas should be under continuous monitoring by the Forest Department personnel to safeguard the existing 

biodiversity of these islands.      

 

The Dhanikhari Experimental Garden-cum-Arboretum maintained by the Andaman and Nicobar Regional 



Centre  of  Botanical  Survey  of  India  plays  a  vital  role  in  conservation  of  endemic  and  threatened  plant 

species  of  Andaman  and  Nicobar  Islands.  Many  in  situ  and  ex  situ  conservation  efforts  have  been 

undertaken  in  the  Dhannikhari  Experimental  Garden  cum  Arboretum  to  conserve  the  endemic  and 

threatened plant genetic diversity of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 

 

The  ENVIS  Centre  on  Floral  Diversity,  Botanical  Survey  of  India  has  published  the  “Bibliography  and 



Abstracts of Papers on Flora of Andaman and Nicobar Islands” (Lakshminarasimhan & al., 2011), which is 

a comprehensive compilation of 815 references with abstract published on flora, forestry, economic and 

ethnobotany of these islands, which would help those who are interested in biodiversity and conservation.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES 

Dagar,  J.C.  &  Singh,  N.T.  1999.  Plant  Resources  of  the  Andaman  and  Nicobar  Islands.  Volume  I.  Bishen 

Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun. 



Dixit, R.D. & Sinha, B.K. 2001. Pteridophytes of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal 

Singh, Dehra Dun. 



ENVIS-WII, 2012. Protected Area Gazette Notification Database (Andaman Nicobar Islands). Available at: 

http://wiienvis.nic.in/ 



Kurz, S. 1870. Report on the vegetation of the Andaman Islands. Office of the Superintend of Government 

Printing, Calcutta.  



Lakshminarasimhan,  P.  &  Rao,  P.S.N.  1996.  A  supplementary  list  of  Angiosperms  recorded  (1983–

1993) from Andaman and Nicobar Islands. J. Econ. Taxon. Bot. 20: 175–185. 



Lakshminarasimhan,  P.,  Gantait,  S.,  Rasingam,  L.  &  Bandyopadhyay,  S.  2011.  Bibliography  and 

Abstracts  of  Papers  on  Flora  of  Andaman  &  Nicobar  Islands.  ENVIS  Centre  on  Floral  Diversity, 

Botanical Survey of India, Howrah. 



Lal, J. 2005. A check-list of Indian Mosses. Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun. 

Mathew, S.P. 1998. A supplementary report on the flora and vegetation of the Bay Islands, India. J. Econ. 

Taxon. Bot. 22: 249–272. 

Singh, L.J., Murugan, C. & Singh, P. 2014. Plant genetic diversity of endemic species in the Andaman and 

Nicobar Islands: A conservation perspective. In: Kumar, P. (ed.), Island Biodiversity. Uttar Pradesh 



State Biodiversity Board, Lucknow. pp. 49–57.  

 

 

 


Yüklə 3,35 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə