And endemic tree from kerala, india- threats



Yüklə 1,04 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü1,04 Mb.

 

 

 



Syzygium travancoricum

 (GAMBLE)-A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED  

AND ENDEMIC TREE FROM KERALA, INDIA- THREATS, 

CONSERVATION AND PREDICTION OF POTENTIAL AREAS; WITH 

SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON Myristica swamps AS A PRIME HABITAT 

Roby T.J.

1

, Joyce Jose*



2

 and P. Vijayakumaran Nair

1

 

1



Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi Trissur, Kerala 

2

Dept of Zoology, St. Thomas College, Thrissur, Kerala 



 E-mail: joyceofthejungle@gmail.com (*Corresponding Author) 

 

 



Abstract:  Syzygium travancoricum (Gamble) is a critically endangered tree endemic to the 

South Western Ghats, India. It has been associated with Myristica swamps of Western Ghats, 

a  naturally  fragmented,  restricted  endemic  ecosystem  with  anthropogenic  threats  to  its 

existence. Randomly selected 17swamps were sampled. IVI and response to selected abiotic 

parameters were calculated and 

girth class distribution plotted. Observations on germination, 

regeneration  and  growth  were  recorded.  Forest  areas  in  Kerala  having  a  potential  to  host  a 

Myristica 

swamp  were  predicted.  Ground  truthing  was  done.  The  possible  number  of  S. 

travancoricum

 individuals was calculated and IUCN categorization re-examined. 153 trees in 

60 swamp patches were counted but only 20 trees were present in 17 transects. Density was 

11 trees/ hectare.

 

S.  travancoricum



 

was the sixth most important tree in the swamps 

(IVI = 

0.1198). Girth class analysis and field observations 



indicate a recent threat in the survival of 

the  species.  Trees  in  the  lower  girth  class  comprising  the  immature  trees  show  a  decline  of 

upto 90%. Seedling responded well to treatment with fungicide and 300 survived in nursery 

as  against  zero  in  the  wild  after  one  year. 

Seven  transplanted  seedlings  (KFRI  arboretum) 

showed  100  %  survival  after  six  years.  PCA  showed  that  S.  travancoricum 

was  tolerant  to 

inundation when compared with the other Syzygium species. 11.76 trees/ 0.01km

or 1176.47 



trees per km

2

 is possible in terms of density. In 148 km



2

 area with a potential for Myristica 

swamps  in  Kerala,  174788.15 

S.  travancoricum 

trees  are  theoretically  possible.  S. 

travancoricum 

remains in the critically endangered category but the criteria may be changed 

to  A1  e.  Steps  should  be  taken  to  ascertain  the  true  population  of  S.  travancoricum  and 

conserve its natural habitat. 

Keywords: Syzygium travancoricum, Myristica swamps, Conservation, Regeneration. 

 

 

 Introduction  



Syzygium  travancoricum

  (Gamble)  is  a  critically  endangered  tree  endemic  to  the  South 

Western  Ghats,  India.  According  to  IUCN  Redlist  2010,  2012  &  2013  only  200  trees  are 

found in Western Ghats. S. travancoricum is an evergreen tree growing upto 25 m in height 

with white flowers belongs to the family Myrtaceae. S. travancoricum was first discovered in 

the swampy lowlands (altitude less than 65 m) of Travancore by Bourdillon in 1894. Gamble 

International Journal of Science, Environment                                                                        ISSN  2278-3687 (O) 

and Technology, Vol. 2, No 6, 2013, 1335 – 1352                                                                      

 

Received Nov 4, 2013 * Published Dec 2, 2013 * www.ijset.net



 

1336                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

(1935) described it in 1918 in the Kew Bulletin and in the Flora of the Presidency of Madras 

in 1919. S. travancoricum are present in evergreen, semi-evergreen forests and a few scared 

groves  in  Thiruvanthapuram,  Kollam,  Pathananthitta,  Alapuzha  and  Thrissur  districts 

(Sasidharan,  2006).  They  have  also  been  reported  from  freshwater  swamps  dominated  by 

trees belonging to the family Myristicaceae, particularly two species viz. Myrisitica magnifica 

and Gymnacranthera farquhariana and are therefore referred to as Myristica swamps.  

Krishnamoorthy (1960) first reported Myristica swamps from the Travancore region of South 

Western Ghats. Champion and Seth (1968) classified such swamps under a newly introduced 

category ‘Myristica Swamp Forests' under the Sub Group 4C. Other descriptions of in India  

Myristica swamps include(Varghese 1992;Chandran et al., 1999;Santhakumaran et al., 1995; 

Dasappa,  2000;  Ravikanth  et  al.,  2004;  Nair  et  a  2007)  As  special  abiotic  conditions 

(Chandran  and  Sivan,  1999  )are  prerequisites  for  the  development  of  Myristica  swamp 

forests, these swamp forests have become highly restricted and fragmented.  

Anthropogenic  interferences  have  further  threatened  the  existence  of  this  ecosystem.  Pascal 

(1988) reported conversion of these swamps to paddy fields and Rodgers and Panwar (1988a; 

1988b) highlighted the systematic destruction of these swamps and called for Priority I level 

implementation of their proposed Myristica swamp Wildlife Sanctuary. Recent studies (Joyce 

et  al., 

2007a,  b  and  c;  Roby  2011,  Nair  et  al  2007)  have  also  outlined  many  threats  to  this 

ecosystem.  Ramesh  and  Pascal  (1997)  considered  Myristica  swamps  as  unique  areas  at  the 

ecosystem level and pointed out that though species poor, most species found in and around 

the swamps are endemics. 

The  present  study  focuses  on  the  distribution  and  quantification  of  S.  travancoricum  in  the 

Myristica

  swamps  of  Southern  Kerala,  its  phenology,  regeneration  and,  threats  faced  at 

various stages of growth. We also predict forest areas that have a potential to be a habitat for 

S. travancoricum 

and while justifying the IUCN classification of ‘Critically Endangered’ call 

for a revision in the light of our studies.  

Study Area 

 

The  study  area,  Myristica  swamps  of  Kulathupuzha  region  is  located  in  Southern 



Kerala  between  the  geo  co-ordinates  8.75°  to  9.0°  N  and  76.75°  to  77.25°  E.  It  is  at  the 

confluence  of  three  revenue  districts  namely  Thiruvananthapuram,  Kollam  and 

Pathanamthitta.  The  swamps  are  scattered  in  three  forest  ranges  namely  Kulathupuzha  and 

Anchal  forest  ranges,  and  Shendurney  Wildlife  Sanctuary  (Fig.1).  Myristica  swamp  forests 

are located along the first order tributaries of the west flowing rivers, Kallada and Itthikkara 


Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1337

(Nair et al., 2007). Roby and Nair (2006) and Nair et al. (2007) have mapped sixty swamp 

patches  having  a  cumulative  area  of  149.75  ha  which  is  0.0039%  of  Kerala’s  land  area 

(38,864  km

2

)  and  0.01348%  of  Kerala’s  forested  lands  (11,126.46  km



2

).  The  climatic  and 

edaphic factors are discussed in methodology for prediction. Fieldwork in Myristica swamps 

was  done  from  November  2004  to  March  2007.  Ground  truthing  surveys  in  non  Myristica 

swamps  forests  were  done  from  March  2007  onwards.  Selected  swamps  in  Uttara  Kannada 

(Darbejaddy,  Nilkuntha,  Thorbe,  Kathelekan)  were  visited  in  2008.  Observations  for 

regeneration studies were continued till February 2011. 

Materials and Methods  

Morphological description of S. travancoricum as given by Sasidharan (2006) was accepted 

as no significantly different observations were made during the study. The bark, leaves and 

friuts are shown in Figures 2 and 3 respectively. 

Data and Data Collection 

1. Quantitative vegetation analysis 

The quantification of data was done only in randomly selected 17 swamps of Kulathupuzha 

forest range and presence of S. travancoricum recorded from the all other swamps including 

Anchal  and  Shendureney  WLS. 

Standard  sampling  methods  (Mueller  and  Dombois,  1974) 

were adopted for the vegetation sampling. using sample plots of 100 x 10 m (0.1ha) divided 

into ten 10 x 10 m quadrats in each individual swamps was done. Trees in each quadrat were 

enumerated, identified and GBH (Girth at Breast Height (1.5m above ground)) of trees with 

above  10  cm  circumference  recorded.  Tree  seedlings  (GBH  below  10cm)  were  enumerated 

from  the  sample  plots  to  determine  the  regeneration  status  of  tree  species  in  the  Myristica 

swamps. 

Density,  Frequency,  Abundance  and  IVI  (Importance  Value  Index),  were  calculated  using 

suitable software (Invent-NTFP) (Sivaram et al., 2006). Based on the presence absence of S. 

travancoricum 

a kernel density map was produced using PAST (software). 

Based on the GBH, trees were grouped into different class intervals as 10-30cm = saplings, 

30-60 cm= poles, 60-90cm= small tree, 90-180=medium tree and above 180=large tree. and 

Girth class distribution was graphically plotted.  

2. Phenological, germination and regeneration studies 

Various reproductive phenological stages such as flowering, fruiting, seed germination of S. 

travancoricum

  trees  found  in  different  Myristica  swamps  in  Kulathupuzha  were  observed 

every month  for two  years using a binocular  (10X40). The growth  and survival rate of 500 


1338                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

seeds of S. travncoricum, germinated in natural habitat were studied.  At the same time 510 

seedlings  of  two  leaf  stage  below  10  cm  height  were  collected  from  the  study  site  and 

transported  to  KFRI  nursery  in  root  trainer.  They  were  treated  with  fungicide  and  proper 

organic  fertilizers  and  irrigated  as  needed.  Surviving  seedlings  were  transferred  to  KFRI 

arboretum  for  further growth observation 

and seven were selected at  random for measuring 

growth stages in field conditions.

 

Three  plants  within  one  metre  distance  from  a  stream  and  the  other  four  at  more  than  one 



metre  distance  from  a  stream  Girth  and  height  of  plants  were  recorded  for  six  years.  Two 

tailed paired Student’s T test was used to find significant difference using XLSTAT 2010. 

3. Response to environmental factors 

The effect of various environmental factors such as area under inundation, inundation depth, 

temperature,  relative  humidity,  canopy  cover,  area  covered  by  litter,  litter  depth,  area  with 

undergrowth, area covered by stilt root, area covered by knee root, GBH classes of trees10-

30,  30-60,  60-90,  90-180,  above  180,  gravel%,  sand%,  silt%,  clay%,  soil  pH  and  soil  OC 

content  on S. travancoricum, was studied by using a PCA using XLSTAT 2010.  

4.  Prediction  of  potential  swamp  forest  areas  that  are  a  prime  habitat  Syzygium 

travancoricum

 

In our study we found S. travancoricum very much adapted to Myristica swamps in Southern 



Kerala with only a few occurrence of S. travancoricum recorded from non–swampy areas. 

According to Sasidharan (1997) this species, endemic to southern Western Ghats of Kerala, is 

associated with the Myristica swamp forests The Myristica swamps’ distribution is specific to 

the following precise physical and climatic factors. 

Elevation: The elevation of the Myristica swamps above sea level seems to be a critical as all 

the  mapped  Myristica  swamps  were  found  between  100-200  m  from  sea  level.  In  Southern 

Western  Ghats  areas  between  100-200  m,  which  are  found  near  rivers  have  the  ability  to 

retain  its  ground  water  level  above  6  m  even  in  summer  season  and  retain  moisture 

throughout the year. Previous workers point out that this retention of moisture is crucial in the 

development of Myristica swamps and also in deciding the vegetation composition at various 

elevations. 

SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topo Mission) data set of NASA distributed by USGS (United States 

Geological Survey) (http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org) was used as material for elevation. The SRTM 

90 m DEMS have a resolution of 90 m at the equator, and are provided in mosaiced 5 degree 



Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1339

x 5 degree tiles, in geographic coordinate system-WGS-84 Datum (World Geodetic System-

84). The vertical error of the DEMs is reported to be less than 16 m.  

Hydrology: Most of the swamps are in the first order streams and in most cases the swamps 

are the origination point of the streamlets. To obtain data on streams, base layers from (scale 

1: 1,000,000) Resource Atlas of Kerala, prepared and published by Centre for Earth Science 

Studies, were digitized and used.  

Soil:  All  Myristica  swamps  mapped  were  found  in  specific  soil  type  which  indicates  the 

influence of soils in the development of a particular plant community. According to soil maps 

of  Kerala  (scale  1:  500,000)  published  by  National  Bureau  of  Soil  Survey  and  Land  Use 

Planning  (ICAR),  the  soil  in  which  the  mapped  Myristica  swamps  were  found  can  be 

classified into two categories.  

1) Mapping Unit-31 Very deep well drained, gravelly loam soils on steeply sloping medium 

hills  with  thick  vegetation,  with  moderate  erosion:  associated  with  very  deep,  well  drained 

soils on moderate slopes. 

2) Mapping Unit-32 Deep well drained, loamy soils on gently sloping low hills with isolated 

hillocks,  with  moderate  erosion:  associated  with  deep,  well  drained,  loamy  soils  with 

coherent material at 100 to 150 cm on moderate slopes, severely eroded.  

Monsoons:  According  to  the  rainfall  map  over  a  period  of  1902-1979  published  by  Centre 

for  Earth  Science  Studies  (CESS)  and  the  location  of  mapped  swamps,  Myristica  swamps 

come under the rainfall range of 50 cm to 150 cm in South West monsoon, 60 cm to 80 cm in 

North East monsoon and 30 cm to 50 cm in rainfall other than monsoon.  

Land use: Myristica swamps are located only in the forested area in the southern part of the 

Kerala. Some swamps of the past are now settlements or plantations. Hence, these areas lie 

outside the natural  forest boundary as shown in  Survey  of  India Topo sheets. Therefore, an 

updated forest map of Kerala prepared by Kerala Forest Research Institute (KFRI) was used 

for obtaining forest layers and protected area coverage of the forest.  

These  different  parameters  were  combined  to  produce  a  model,  which  could  simulate  the 

areas that have the potential to be Myristica swamp. The process is depicted in the flowchart 

below (Fig. 5). 

Results and Discussion 

Importance value index of (IVI) S. travancoricum 

We  counted  153  trees  in  and  around  the  sixty  swamps  but  of  the  17  Myristica  swamps  in 

Kulathupuzha  Forest  Range  sampled  using  transect  (17000  m

2

)  only  six  swamps  have 



1340                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

S.travancoricum

 and only twenty trees were present in the transect. Going by the IVI values 

S. travancoricum

 is in sixth position when compared to other tree species in the 17 Myristica 

swamps sampled in Kulathupuzha (Table 1).  

 

Table 1: Summary of the selected tree characteristics of Myristica swamps: (values 



interpolated to hectare). 

Species 


AB 



RD 

RF 



RBA 

IVI 


Gymnacranthera 

farquhariana 

760  447.0588 

0.3384  0.8941  0.2013  0.3324  0.8721 



Myristica fatua var. 

magnifica 

691  406.4706  5.0809  0.3077  0.8000  0.1801  0.2505  0.7383 

Lophopetalum 

wightianum 

197  115.8824  2.3452  0.0877  0.4941  0.1113  0.1145  0.3135 

Vateria indica 

144  84.7059 

3.3488  0.0641  0.2529  0.0570  0.0548  0.1758 

Holigarna 

arnottiana 

079  46.4706 

1.6458  0.0352  0.2824  0.0636  0.0476  0.1463 

Syzygium 

travancoricum 

020  11.7647 

1.2500  0.0089  0.0941  0.0212  0.0897  0.1198 

Others species  

355  208.8229  57.1082 

0.157  1.6239  0.3647  0.1102  0.6341 

Total 

2246  1321.176  75.7789  1.0000  4.4415  1.0000  1.0000  3.0000 



 

If the values for S .travancoricum from only those six swamps (where it is actually present) 

are considered (Table 2) then the importance of S. travancoricum in the swamps increases.  

 

Table 2: Position of Syzygium travancoricum in selected Myristica swamps in Southern 



Kerala (values interpolated to hectare). 

Site  


AB 



RD 

RF 



RBA 

IVI 


Emponge  

50 



1.25 

0.0472 


0.4 

0.0816 


0.296 

0.425 


Karinkurinji  

20 



1.00 

0.0112 


0.2 

0.0392 


0.256 

0.306 


Marappalam Major 

40 



1.33 

0.0296 


0.3 

0.0857 


0.210 

0.325 


Perum Padappy 

50 



1.67 

0.0342 


0.3 

0.0469 


0.272 

0.353 


Plavu Chal 

30 



1.00 

0.0201 


0.3 

0.0526 


0.269 

0.3406 


Pullu Mala  

  1 


10 

1.00 


0.0109 

0.1 


0.0222 

0.010 


0.0431 

 


Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1341

 

In  Uttara  Kannada,  where  another  sub-population  of  S.  travancoricum  has  been 



reported  (Chandran  et  al.  2010,  Chandran  et  al.  2008)  the  position  of  S.  travancoricum  in 

terms of IVI is 17

th

. The IVI values range from 0.1065 to 0.5483 (Chandran et al. 2010). The 



mean IVI of 0.3044 is slightly higher than 0.2988, the mean of the  IVI s recorded from the 

transects in six swamps of Southern Kerala (Table 2). 

Girth class distribution  

The  girth  class  distribution  for  S.  travancoricum  is  shown  in  the  graph  Fig.  6.  The  graph 

shows  reduced  number  of  individuals  in  the  lower  girth  classes  and  the  graph  plotted  is  an 

almost  perfect  J  instead  of  the  expected  inverted  J.  While  phenological  studies  indicate 

normal  fruiting  and  seed  germination  patterns  for  this  species,  regeneration  enumeration 

shows  that  the  problem  may  be  in  seedling  recruitment.  This  indicates  the  there  is  a  recent 

threat  in  the  survival  of  the  species.  Whereas,  in  the  Uttara  Kannada  sub-population  of  S. 

travancoricum 

graphical  representations  of  girth  class  distribution  return  an  almost  perfect 

inverted  J  (Chandran  et  al.  2010)  indicating  a  healthy  regeneration  pattern  especially  when 

compared with the Myristica swamps of Southern Kerala. 

The data further indicates a steady future decline of the S. travancoricum population with 

immature trees contributing only 25% to the population in the transects. Trees in the lower 

girth class comprising the immature trees show a decline of upto 90% (Table 3). 

Table 3: Population decline in S. travancoricum indicated by % of various girth classes 

Girth 


class 

No. of 


trees 

% of total 

% of mature and 

immature trees 

% of decline of 

immature trees 

120-180 

10 


50 

75 


mature 

90-120 


15 


mature 

60-90 


10 


mature 

30- 60 


15 


25 

85 


10- 30 

10 



90 

Total 


20 

100 


100 

 



Response to environmental parameters 

S.  travancoricum 

showed  maximum  tolerance  to  inundation  when  compared  to  the  other 

three  Syzigium  species  found  in  the  swamp  (Fig.  7).  Soil  texture  especially  the  percent  of 

gravel and sand seemed to elicit a positive response from the tree. S. travancoricum did not 

respond negatively to low pH of the soil (which is characteristic of the swamps) At the same 



1342                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

time the PCA map shows that humidity (a characteristic of the swamps) was placed quite far 

from S. travancoricum  and undergrowth (not a characteristic of the swamps) is placed quite 

close  to  S.  travancoricum.  In  the  swamps,  profuse  undergrowth  is  rare  due  minimal 

penetration  of  sunlight  to  the  forest  floor.  However,  as  S.  travancoricum  has  a  distinct  leaf 

fall stage, the forest floor around this tree can support at least seasonal undergrowth. Better 

sunlight penetration around the tree also reduces humidity when compared to other areas in 

the  swamp.  So  on  one  hand  while  S.  travancoricum  seems  well  adjusted  to  the  salient 

environmental  feature  of  the  swamp,  namely  inundation,  closely  associated  parameter 

humidity, and seems to deter the presence the tree. S. travancoricum may thus not qualify to 

be a true swamp species like Myristica magnifica but seems better  adapted  to the swamps 

than many other non swampy species. 

Density and abundance of saplings inside the swamps 

Of a total of 6402 saplings (GBH below 10cm) recorded from the 17000 m

2

 area of Myristica 



swamps  sampled  S.  travancoricum  contributed  0.48%  (30  individuals)  and  occurred  in  10 

plots out of 17 plots sampled. 

Phenology  

 

Leaf fall of this tree begins in January followed by flushing by mid February. Leaves begin to 



mature  at  the  end  of  April.  Flowering  starts  at  the  end  of  March.  Flowers  mature  up  to  the 

month  of  July.  Fruiting  begins  at  end  of  April  and  extends  up  to  September.  At  the  end  of 

September  most  of  the  fruits  fall  Germination  of  the  seeds  follow  within  one  month. 

Numerous  seeds  germinated  below  the  trees  but  almost  all  the  seedlings  dry  up  in  the 

seedling stage. 

Regeneration 

We observed S. travancoricum produce thousands of seeds per tree (Fig. 4) every year. Most 

of these seeds germinated within one or two weeks but the seedlings do not survive after the 

two-leaf seedling stage.  Usually the swamps are  inundated at the time of  fruit fall and seed 

germination.  It  was  presumed  that  fungal  attack  in  the  intense  humid  nature  of  the  swamp 

conditions is the problem.  

Nursery trials  

Of the 510 seedlings of S. travancoricum at ‘two leaf stage’ collected from Myristica swamp 

and transported in root trainer 500 survived and were planted in the nursery and treated with 

Bavistin  fungicide  to  prevent  fungal  attack.  300  seedlings  (Fig.  8)  survived  after  one  year. 

Field observations showed that no seedlings survived in the wild. 



Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1343

In field trials  

The  seven  transplanted  seedlings  of  S.  travancoricum  (randomly  selected)  showed  100 

percent survival. They  reached an  average height of 193.14 cm in six  years with the height 

ranging between 66-250 cm. The average diameter was 2.87 cm with values ranging between 

0.9 - 4.7 cm. 

The trees planted within one-metre radius from the stream showed a mean height of 331.167 

m and trees planted beyond the one-metre radius showed a mean height of 186.556 m. There 

was  a  significant  difference  between  the  heights  of  the  two  sets  of  trees  over  six  years  of 

observation (p-value (Two-tailed) = 0.042; alpha = 0.05; DF; 5). The mean girth of the trees 

planted within one-metre radius from the stream had a mean girth of 

10.050 cm and for 

the 


trees  planted  beyond  the  one-metre  radius,  the  mean  girth  was 

4.802  cm.  There  was  no 

significant difference between the girths of the two sets of trees over six years of observation 

(p-value (Two-tailed) = 

0.119

; alpha = 0.05; DF; 5).  



Distribution of Syzygium travancoricum in Myristica swamps in Kulathupuzha region 

Out  of  60  Myristica  swamps  studied,  29  swamps  had  S.  travancoricum.  The  swamps  in 

Shendureny  WLS  sanctuary  had  maximum  number  of  trees.  The  distribution  of  S. 

travancoricum

 is depicted in the kernel density map is (Fig.9).

 

Identification of potential areas by using GIS 



Based  on  GIS  studies,  it  was  predicted  that  S.  travncoricum  are  mostly  found  in  Myristica 

swamps,  other  swampy  areas  and  river  banks  of  Southern  Kerala.  The  geographical 

distribution  of  surviving  Myristica  swamps  were  studied  and  mapped.  Trivandrum  and 

Punalur  Forest  Division  show  maximum  potential  area  of  Myristica  swamps  (Table  4  and 

Fig. 10).

 

This area includes Anchal and Kulathupuzha Forest ranges.  



Other forest areas also showed potential as a habitat for S. travancoricum, but in much lower 

degrees (less than 1%). 

Ground truthing in Non Myristica Forests 

Surveys  in  forest  areas  of  Kerala  from  2007  March  onwards  in  both  high  altitude  and  low 

altitude areas have not led to the discovery of a sizeable sub population of S. travancoricum 

outside the Myristica swamps. Chalakudy Forest Division including (Athirapally, Vazhachal 

and Charpa Forest Ranges) has a small population of S. travancoricum with 20 mature trees 

recorded by us.  

 

 


1344                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

IUCN Status and Criteria 

Following  the  various  published  reports  of  S.  travancoricum  we

 

can  estimate  at  the  least  a 



total  of  287  trees  (all  are  not  mature)  in  Kerala  (South  of  Palakad  Gap)  by  adding  up  four 

trees  from  Aickad  sacred  grove,

 

20  from  Guddrikal,  110  from  Kalassamala  grove  (Sudhi, 



2012)  and  153  from  our  own  observations  in  the  Myristica  swamps  of  Southern  Kerala.  In 

Uttara  Kannada  published  reports  establish  the  presence  of  35  individual  trees  from  the

 

Myristica 



swamps of Siddapur taluk (14.4° N) and a single tree from Ankola (Chandran et al, 

2008, 2010).  

Table 4: Areas with potential for Myristica swamps in Kerala forests 

S. No. 


Forest Division 

Potential area 

in km

2

 



Total forest 

area in km

2

 

% -potential 



area 

Ranni 



5.067 

1059.07 


0.478439 

Konni 



20.12 

0331.66 


6.066454 

Achankovil 



02.21 

0269.00 


0.821561 

Punalur 



40.29 

0280.22 


14.37799 

Thenmala 



04.27 

0206.17 


2.071106 

Trivandrum 



46.20 

0369.88 


12.49054 

Shendurney WLS 



04.23 

0100.32 


4.216507 

Peppara WLS 



14.82 

0053.00 


27.96226 

Agasthyavanam BP 



11.36 

0031.12 


36.50386 

 

Total 



148.57 

2700.44 


5.501585 

 

Since  S.  travancoricum  has  been  seen  closely  associated  with  Myristica  swamps,  if  we 



extrapolate with our data on S. travancoricum and Myristica swamps of Kerala we find that 

11.76  trees/  0.01km

2

  or  1176.47  trees  per  km



2

  is  possible  in  terms  of  density.  Given  our 

prediction of about 148km

2

 area with a potential for Myristica swamps in Kerala, we could 



theoretically  have  had  174788.15  trees  for  this  entire  area.  This  would  be  in  terms  of 

individual trees. 

While  our  data  indicates  that  there  may  be  more  than  250  mature  individuals  our  data  also 

shows  that  there  has  been  a  continuing  decline  over  the  generations  and  that  pole  sized 

individuals of the species are almost 90% less than the mature individuals.  

Population  reduction  is  clearly  proved  from  our  data  and  there  is  a  continuing  threat  to  the 

seedlings in the wild in the form of pathogens (IUCN criteria A1 e). Therefore, we suggest 


Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1345

that while S. travancoricum must remain in the critically endangered category till more data 

is unearthed the criteria should be changed to A1 e from C2a.  

Conclusion  

 

We agree with Chandran et al., 2008, who express hope that  more such relic patches 



with their valuable biota might be in existence in between Travancore and Uttara Kannada. 

Rigourous groundwork along with GIS and RS studies is necessary to validate the presence 

of more subpopulations of S. travancoricum. This is especially necessary because we have no 

record of extensive logging or habitat destruction of this tree during the inception of modern 

forestry in India by the British because of zero timber value.  

 

Dasa  et  al.  (2006)  have  considered  Kulathupuzha  Reserve  Forests  as  a  totally 



irreplaceable  gird  for  the  endangered  species  Canthium  pergracilis  and  the  Kulathupuzha-

Palode forests as high conservation priority in the Western Ghats. Kulathupuzha area is one 

of  the  few  regions  having  Myristica  swamps.  Inspite  of  the  high  biodiversity  value  of 

Western  Ghats  it  is  most  threatened  among  the  hotspots  as  this  region  has  the  highest 

population density per sq km (340km

2

) and a positive growth rate (Cincotta et al., 2000).  



We  conclude  that  while  steps  should  be  taken  to  ascertain  the  true  population  of  S. 

travancoricum

  and  all  efforts  in-situ  and  ex-  situ  be  taken  to  ensure  the  continuity  of  this 

species, conserving the habitat in its pristine form should also be prioritized. 

Conservation of Myristica swamps has many benefits which includes preservation of one of 

the  smallest  and  most  fragmented  ecosystems  found  almost  nowhere  else  in  the  world.  It 

would  also  ensure  protection  to  many  endemic  and  red-listed  populations  of  plants  and 

animals.  

References 

[1]


 Bourdillon  TF  (1908)  The  Forest  Trees  of  Travancore.  The  Travancore  Government 

Press, Trivandrum. pp. 238-239. 

[2]

 Chandran, M.D.S., D.K. Mesta, M.B. Naik. 1999. Myristica swamps of Uttara Kannada 



District. My Forest, 35(3): 217-222. 

[3]


 Chandran, M.D.S and V.V. Sivan.1999. Myristicaceae. Classroom Lifescape Series, Part 

II. Resonance 72: 10-12. 

[4]

 Chandran,  M.D.  S,  D.K.  Mesta,  G.R.  Rao,  Sameer  Ali,  K.V.  Gururaja  and  T.V. 



Ramachandra.  2008.  Discovery  of  Two  Critically  Endangered  Tree  Species  and  Issues 

1346                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

Related to Relic Forests of the Western Ghats. The Open Conservation Biology Journal. 2, 1-

8.    

[5]


 Chandran, M.D.S., Rao, G.R.,  Gururaja, K.V. and Ramachandra, T.V. 2010: Ecology of 

the swampy  relic forests of Kathalekan from Central Western Ghats,  India. Bioremediation, 

Biodiversity and Bioavailablity

, 4(Special issue 1), 54-68. 

[6]

 Champion,  H.G.  and  S.K.  Seth.  1968.  A  revised  survey  of  the  forest  types  of  India. 



Government of India. xxiii+404 pp. 

[7]


 Cincotta  R.P.,  J.  Wisnewski  and  R.  Engleman.  2000.  Human  population  in  the 

biodiversity hotspots. Nature. 404: 990-992. 

[8]

 Dasappa, Swaminath MH (2000) A new species of Semecarpus (Anacardiaceae) from the 



Myristica 

swamps of Western Ghats of North Kanara, Karnataka, India. Indian Forester 126: 

78-82. 

[9]


 Dasa, A., J. Krishnaswamya, K.S. Bawaa, M.C. Kirana, V. Srinivas, N. Samba Kumar, K. 

U.  Karanth.  2006.  Prioritisation  of  conservation  areas  in  the  Western  Ghats,  India.  Biol. 

Conserv.

, 133: 16-31. 

[10]

 Gamble  JS  (1935)  Flora  of  the  Presidency  of  Madras,  Adlard  and  Son,  Ltd.,  London, 



Vol. 1. 477, 480. 

[11]


 Joyce  J.,  K.K.  Ramachandran  and  P.V.  Nair.  2007a.  A  rare  and  little  known  lizard, 

Otocryptis  beddomi

  from  the  Myristica  swamps  of  Southern  Kerala,  India.  Herpetological 

Bulletin


. 101:27-31. 

[12]


 Joyce  J.,  K.K.  Ramachandran  and  P.V  Nair.  2007b.  A  preliminary  overview  and 

checklist of the spider fauna of Myristica swamp forests of Southern Kerala, India. Newsl. Br. 

arachnol. Soc.

109: 12-14. 

[13]

 Joyce J., K.K. Ramachandran, and P. V. Nair. 2007c. Animal diversity of the Myristica 



swamp  forests  of,  Southern  Kerala  with  special  reference  to  herpetofauna.  In:  The 

Proceedings of the 19

th

 Kerala Science Congress



, 29

th

 -31



st

 January 2007. 724-726. 

[14]

 Krishnamoorthy,  K.  1960.  Myristica  swamps  in  the  evergreen  forests  of  Travancore. 



Indian For

., 86(5): 314-315. 

[15]

 Mueller,  D.,  and  H.E.  Dombois.  1974.  Aims  and  methods  of  vegetation  ecology.  John 



Wiley and Sons. London. xix+547. 

[16]


 Nair, P.V., K.K. Ramachandran, K. Swarupanandan and T. P. Thomas. 2007. Mapping 

biodiversity of the Myristica swamps in Southern Kerala

. Report submitted to MoEF. 255 pp. 


Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1347

[17]

 Pascal, J.P., 1988. Wet evergreen forests of the Western Ghats of India. French Insititute, 



Pondichery. 345 pp. 

[18]


 Ramesh, B.R. and J.P. Pascal. 1997. Atlas of the Endemics of the Western Ghats (India). 

Distribution  of  tree  species  in  the  evergreen  and  semi  evergreen  forests

.  French  Institute, 

Pondicherry. 403 pp. 

[19]

 Radha, R., Mohan, M.S.S.; A. Anand. 2000. Anti-fungal properties of crude leaf extracts 



of Syzygium travancoricum. Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Sciences. Vol. 22 No. 

1B. 721-722. 

[20]

 Ravikanth, G., R. Vasudeva, K.N. Ganeshaiah and R. Uma Shaanker. 2004. Molecular 



analysis  of  Semecarpus  kathalekanensis  (Anacardiaceae)  -  a  newly  described  species  from 

the Myristica swamps of Western Ghats, India. The Indian Forester 130 (1): 101-104. 

[21]

 Roby,  T.J.  and  P.V.  Nair.  2006.  Myristica  swamps  –  an  endangered  ecosystem  in  the 



Western Ghats. In: The Proceedings of the XVIII Kerala Science Congress, 386–388. 

[22]


 Roby T. J.2011. Floristic structure and diversity of Myristica Swamps at Kulathupuzha 

in a GIS perspective. (Ph.D. Thesis). FRIU, Dehradun. 

[23]

 Rodgers,  W.A.  and  H.S.  Panwar.  1988a.  Planning  wildlife  protected  area  network  in 



India

. Vol I. The Report. A report prepared for the Department of Environment, Forests and 

Wildlife, Government of India at Wildlife Institute of India. 341 pp. 

[24]


 Rodgers,  W.A.  and  H.S.  Panwar.  1988b.  Planning  wildlife  protected  area  network  in 

India


.  Vol  II.  State  Summaries.  A  report  prepared  for  the  Department  of  Environment, 

Forests and Wildlife, Government of India at Wildlife Institute of India. 267 pp. 

[25]

 Santhakumaran, L.N., A. Singh and V.T. Thomas. 1995. Description of a sacred grove in 



Goa  (India),  with  notes  on  the  unusual  aerial  roots  produced  by  its  vegetation.  Wood.  Oct-

Dec: 24-28. 

[26]

 Sasidharan,  N.  1997.  Studies  on  the  flora  of  Shendurney  Wildlife  Sanctuary  with 



emphasis on endemic species

. KFRI Research Report No 128. KFRI. Peechi. xvi+401 pp. 

[27]

 Sasidharan,  N.  2006.  Illustrated  manual  on  tree  flora  of  Kerala  supplemented  with 



computer aided identification

. KFRI Research Report No 282. 502 pp. 

[28]

 Sivaram, M, N. Sasidharan, S. Ravi and P. Sujanapal. 2006. Computer aided inventory 



analysis for sustainable management of non-timber forest product resources. Journal of Non 

Timber Forest Products

. 13(4): 237-244. 

[29]


 Sudhi, K.S. 2012. Kalassamala grove glows green. Report in The Hindu dated 26-03-

2012. 


1348                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

[30]


 URL:  http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/static/categories_criteria_2_3.  accessed  on 

14/04/2011, 09/09/2012  

[31]

 URL:http;//www.iucnredlist.org/serach-IUCN  2013.  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened 



Species. Version 2013.1. accessed on 04-11-2013 

[32]


 URL: http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org/ accessed on 05/01/2008. 

[33]


 Varghese, V. 1992. Vegetation structure, floristic diversity and edaphic attributes of the 

fresh  water  swamps  forests  in  Southern  Kerala

.  Dissertation  submitted  to  College  of 

Forestry, Kerala Agricultural University for award of B.Sc. 113+iv. 

Acknowledgements 

The work is part of a project was funded by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Govt’ 

of India. We are grateful to Dr. J. K. Sharma, Dr. R. Gnanaharan Dr K. V. Sankaran (former 

Directors) and Director  KFRI  for  encouragement and support. We acknowledge Mr. Shinoj 

T.M. and our trackers for assistance in field and the Kerala State Forest Department for co-

operation.  We  thank  everyone  at  KFRI  especially  those  at  the  KFRI  Library  and  KFRI 

Nursery. 

 

FIGURES   



 

    


 

 


Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1349

 

Figure 1a and b. Study Area 



 

 

                            Fig 2: Bark Surface                   Fig4: Seedlings in natural habitat 



 

1350                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

 

Fig 5: 



Various steps for the prediction of prime habitat for Syzygium travancoricum 

 

 



 

Fig 6. Girth

 class distribution of Syzygium travancoricum

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Syzygium travancoricum

 (Gamble)-A Critically Endangered  and Endemic Tree ...              1351

 

 

Fig 7. PCA map showing 



S. travancoricum

’s response to environmental gradients in the swamp 

 

 

 



Fig 8. Syzygium travancoricum in KFRI nursery 

-1                -0.75                 -0.5                   -0.25                  0                    0.25                 0.5                 0.75                    1

1

0

0.25



0.5

0.75


-0.25

-0.5


-0.75

-1

Variables (axes F1 and F2:   66.73 %)



F2 (17.22 %)

F1 (49.51 %)



1352                                             Roby T.J., Joyce Jose and P. Vijayakumaran Nair 

 

Fig 9. Kernel density map of Syzygium travancoricum 



 

Fig 10.


 

Area with a potential for Myristica swamp restoration- a prime habiat for Syzigium travancoricum 

(Kollam and Trivandrum districts are most favorable for Myristica swamps. As per the analysis the 

forest in the southern parts have more area coming under the required elevation, hydrology and 

rainfall and soil type for sustaining Myristica swamps) 

8.78                 8.8                 8.82               8.84                8.86               8.88                 8.9                8.92                8.94

4.03E0

2.68E0


1.34E0

6.78E0


Longitiude

77.12


77.1

77.08


77.06

77.04


77.02

77

76.98



Latitude


Yüklə 1,04 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə