And its trade in papua new guinea



Yüklə 245,53 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix25.03.2017
ölçüsü245,53 Kb.
  1   2   3

THE STATUS OF THE TIMBER TREE: POMETIA PINNATA 

AND ITS TRADE IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Prepared by Pius Piskaut

1

, Kipiro Damas



2

 and Phille Daur

1

,  


 

1. Biology Department, University of Papua New Guinea, P.O 

Box 320, Waigani, National Capital District, Papua New Guinea. 

Tel: +675 326 7154, email: 

piskautp@upng.ac.pg 

 

2. Senior Botanist, Forest Biology Program, Papua New Guinea Forest Research Institute, 



P. O Box 314, Lae, Morobe. 

Tel: +675 472 4188, email: 

kdamas@fri.pngfa.gov.pg

 

 



  

 

 



 

August, 2006 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

2

 



ABSTRACT 

 

Taun or Pometia pinnata is a widely distributed timber species on the island of New 



Guinea  and  the  neighboring  Asian  and  Pacific  Island  countries.  Base  on  current 

taxonomic revision there are eight different forms recorded in the Asia-Pacific region. 

In  Papua  New  Guinea  four  forms  have  recorded; f.  pinnata,  f.  tomentosa,  f.  glabra, 

and f. repanda. However, there are evidence indicating another form (form nov.) that 

resembles both f. pinnata and f. tomentosa.  

 

Taun  is  one  of  the  highly  priced  tropical  hardwood  timbers  on  the  market.  Current 



market  prices  range  from  US$70  for  round  logs  and  up  to  US$400  per  m

for 



processed logs. In Papua New Guinea, taun contributed up to 13% of the total volume 

exported. China is by far the biggest importer of saw/veneer logs. Australia and New 

Zealand are the main importer of processed taun timbers. There are no firm cases of 

illegal  logging  of  taun  although  it  was  the  case  20  years  ago.  However,  there  are 

minor  discrepancies  in  shipment  that  may  be  categorized  as  illegal  activities.  The 

monitoring  by  SGS  on  behalf  of  the  PNGFA  has  successfully  minimized  such 

discrepancies.  The  current  analysis  of  taun  concludes  that,  although  there  are  laws, 

policies and regulating mechanisms already in place, these must be strengthen where 

necessary,  then  implemented  by  all  stakeholders  to  manage  this  very  important 

resource. 

 

Key  words:  Taun,  Pometia  pinnata,  taxonomy,  species,  forms,  ecology,  timbers, 

distribution, market, policies, Act. 



 

 

3

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

 

We would like to acknowledge WWF (PNG) and especially the Project Coordinator, 



Mr.  Ted  Mamu  who  provided  us  with  valuable  information  and  guided  us  in  our 

write-up. To Ms Fanny Yaninen of WWF, without your expertise, we would not have 

created a proper distribution map of Pometia – thank you! We also give gratitude to 

the following people who commented and gave useful information on the first draft: 

Mr.  Lyndon  Pangkali  of  WWF  Indonesia-  Sahul  Program,  Mr.  Roy  Banka,  PNG 

Forest Research Institute; Miss Zola Sangga, WWF – PNG; Mr. Gewa Gamoga, PNG 

Forest  Authority;  Mr.  Bazakie  Baput,  FPCD  –PNG;  Mr.  Israel  F  Bewang,  Masters 

Scholar, ANU; Mr. Biatus Bito, WWF – Transfly Ecoregion;  and Dr. Mex Peki, PNG 

Forest Research Institute. Lastly, thank you to TRAFFIC (Oceania) who funded the 

project. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Cover Pictures: R-L drainage and habitat common for taun trees, middle – lowland 

rainforest showing two Pometia or taun trees, These can be singled out by the reddish 

or rufous crown; bottom right – stem of Pometia (Photos by Mr. Ted Mamu – WWF 

PNG);  top  right  –  seedling  of  Pometia  pinnata  f.  glabra  (Photo  by  D.  Kipiro  – 

PNGFRI). 


 

4

Table of Contents 



 

ABSTRACT 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 



1.0 Introduction 

2.0 Taxonomy 



2.1 Description Of The Genus 

11 

2.2 Description Of The Forms 



13 

Pometia pinnata form pinnata Jacobs 

13 


Pometia pinnata form tomentosa (Bl.) Jacobs 

13 


Pometia pinnata form glabra (Bl.) Jacobs  

14 


Pometia pinnata form repanda Jacobs  

15 


Pometia pinnata form nov. (NGI relative) 

15 


3.0 General Ecology 

15 


4.0 Growth and development 

17 


5.0 Conservation status 

18 


6.0 Harvesting And Trade 

18 


6.1 Forest Inventories and Logging acquisition  

18 


6.2 Log Export  

20 


6.3 Processed Taun Export  

22 


6.4 Trade Flow 

23 


6.5 Export Discrepancies  

24 


7.0 Management And Regulation  

26 


7.1 Statutory Requirements 

26 


7.2 Informed Consent 

27 


7.3 Sustained Timber Yield  

28 


7.4 Harvesting Regulations 

28 


7.5 Contractual Requirements 

28 


7.6 Environmental Plans  

29 


7.7 Effectiveness of Forestry Act 

29 


8.0 Recommendations 

30 


9.0 References  

32 


Appendix I  

34 


Appendix II  

35

 



 

 

 



 

5

List of tables 

Table 1. Enumeration of Pometia pinnata within the Managalas Plateau, Northern 

Province……………………………………………………………………   

16 

 

Table 2. Comparison of merchantable taun volume per hectare (m



3

/ha) in productive 

low  altitude  forests  on  uplands  and  other  low  altitude  forest  types  for  major  timber 

resource provinces (data extracted from Hammermaster and Saunders,1995, otherwise 

as indicated)……………………………………………………………….   

19 


 

Table 3. Export of processed taun from 2001 to 2004……………………..  

23 

 

Table 4. Taun export discrepancies in volume exported January and March, 2005.. 25 



 

 


 

6

List of Figures 



 

Figure  1. Distribution of Pometia pinnata………………………………. 



 

 



Figure 2. Distribution of Pometia pinnata and its forms in PNG…. ….. 

 

10 



 

Figure 3. Diameter distribution of Pometia pinnata at Managalas Plataeu, Northern 

Province………………………………………………………………… 

 

17 



 

Figure 4. Percentage value of taun exported from 1997 to 2005………..   

21 

 

Figure 5. Percentage revenue contribution of major timber species  ……   



22 

 

Figure 6. Trade flow in international markets of taun logs from PNG…..   



24

 

7

1.0 Introduction 

Forestry  is  a  key  sector,  which,  if  properly  managed,  can  continuously  generate 

revenue  for  the  people  of  Papua  New  Guinea.  This  is  because  forest  resources  are 

renewable  national  assets.  This  long  held  view  is  echoed  by  many  people  in  the 

government  and  private  sectors.  Furthermore,  this  view  is  clearly  stipulated  in  the 

country’s constitution  and  defined  approaches  to  forest  management were  legislated 

in  the  Forest  Act  1991,  as  amended  in  1993,  1996,  2000,  and  2005,  and  the 

Environment  Act  2000.  However,  there  are  still  grey  areas  that  have  led  to  general 

abuses to  forest  resources  such  as  illegal  activities  and  non compliance  to  the Acts.  

While political interference, corruption, literal flaws in the Act (misinterpretation of 

the Act), and lack of human resources to implement forest policies appear to be key 

issues  to  sound  forest  management,  information  on  major  forest  resources  is  also  a 

key  factor  in  terms  of  drawing  up  proper  forest  policies  to  safeguard  the  timber 

resources for future generations.  

There are at least 100 native timber species occurring in mixed lowland and montane 

forests  of  Papua  New  Guinea  (PNG),  although  taxonomic  determination  of  timber 

species is inadequate, resulting in lumping of species under one genus. Of this total at 

least  30  timber  species  are  commonly  logged,  and  exported  as  round  or  processed 

logs.  Pometia  pinnata  is  one  such  timber  species  that  is  highly  favored  both  in 

domestic and international markets. It is commonly known as taun, and has many uses 

especially in buildings, panel, veneer, joinery, furniture, cabinet work, boat building, 

moulding,  interior  finish,  door,  window  frames,  fibre-board,  billiard  tables  and  tool 

handles (Eddowes, 1977). The fruits are also edible. 

This  report  reviews  the  status  of  Pometia  and  its  trade  in  PNG.  It  draws  together 

scattered  information  (published  and  unpublished)  available  on  this  species.    The 

report does not pretend to present all information regarding Pometia.  Nevertheless, it 

is  envisaged  that  the  information  herein  would  open  up  our  understanding  of  this 

species  or  stimulate  further  research  into  the  scientific  and  trade  aspects  of  this 

species.  



 

8

2.0 Taxonomy 

The  genus  Pometia  in  the  family  Sapindaceae  is  known  by  two  species,  P.  pinnata 

and P. ridleyiPometia ridleyi is distributed throughout Malesia except for Singapore 

and P.pinnata is found in Ceylon, the Adamans and throughout Malesia to Samoa. In 

PNG,  P.pinnata  is  common  throughout  the  lowlands,  and  occurs  on  wide  range  of 

vegetation  and  soil  types  (Figure  1).  P.  pinnata  is  known  by  8  different  forms  of 

which  4  have  been  recorded  in  PNG  (Figure  2).  These  are  f.  pinnata,  f.  glabra,  f. 



repanda  and  f.tomentosa.  The  species  is  well  known  throughout  the  lowlands  of 

Papua  New  Guinea  for  its  sweet  succulent  fruits  as  well  as  for  it's  timber  quality. 

Several  authors  have  worked  on  the  genus,  the  latest  of  them  being  Jacobs  (1962). 

The recognition of forms is not accepted by most foresters and the logging industry 

because the differences between various forms had not been adequately investigated. 

Much  confusion  exists  in  the  distinctions  between  f.  pinnata  and  f.  tomentosa.  The 

work on the genus by Jacobs, 1962 revealed that 4 different forms pinnata, f. glabra. 

f. tomentosa, f. repanda were known in Papua New Guinea. Among them, two have 

been commonly exported for timber, f. glabra and f. pinnata. The form tomentosa on 

the other hand has also been logged in area where it is seen.  

 

Of  the  four  forms  in  PNG,  it  was  observed  that  the  f.  tomentosa  and  f.  pinnata  are 



very  unique  in  their  individual  morphology.  The  description  by  Jacobs  (1962)  on 

leaflet characters was consistent throughout their respective localities. Recent work on 

the  species  by  Damas,  1993  noted  in  the  New  Guinea  Islands  region  (NGI)  that  f. 

pinnata  and  f.  tomentosa  had  other  relatives,  similar  in  leaflet  morphology  but 

differing in their bole lengths and size of the fruits. The fruits of these relatives  are 

large, somewhat as big as normal chicken eggs and have thicker arillodes which are 

edible  unlike  those  of  f.  pinnata,  f.  tomentose,  and  f.  repanda.  All  have  some 

morphological  similarities  during  their  seedling  and  sapling  stages,  they  differ 

morphologically as they mature

When the mature trees were observed, it was noted 



that the type f. tomentosa obviously differed from f. pinnata and its relatives by leaflet 

characters.  Form  pinnata  and  its  NGI  relative  more  or  less  maintain  the  leaflet 

characters  but  the  fruit  sizes  differ.  The  form  repanda  was  distinguished  by  the 

coriaceous  texture  of  the  leaflets  and  its  leaflet  shape  and  more  or  less  repand 

margins.  The  type  P.  pinnata  f.  glabra  (Jacobs,  1962)  seemed  to  vary  in  various 


 

9

localities in terms of bole length, crown formation and fruit size and color. The flesh 



in the fruits of this particular form was thicker and edible.  

 

 



 

 

Figure  1.  Distribution  of Pometia  pinnata. The  dark  shaded  area  depicts absence  of 



P.pinnata.

 

10

 



 

 

 



Figure 2. Distribution of Pometia pinnata and its forms in PNG.

 

11

2.1 Description of the Genus  

 

Pometia J.R. & G. Forst. 

 

Pometia  includes  trees  attaining  big  sizes  often  with  large  buttresses  up  to  1.5m  or 



more.  Often  juvenile  shoots  or  innovations  have  a  bright  reddish  or  purplish 

tinge,(hirsute) with distinct rather stiff or bristly hairs. Leaves compound, paripinnate 

up to 1 m long with 4 to 17 or more pair of leaflets. Leaflets coriaceous to herbaceous, 

often increased in size, on average 12 to 30 x 4 to 10 cm, sometimes larger, venations 

distinct  with  midribs  and  veins  more  prominent  beneath;  blade  assymetrical,  with 

acroscopial half being  wider and more extended at the base. Inflorescence terminal or 

rarely  axillary.  Flowers  polygamous.  Male  flowers  about  4  mm  across;  calyx  cup 

shaped with 5–8 lobes, with erect teeth, petals 5, rarely as long as the calyx lobes; disc 

thick, yellow, lacking ovary; stamens 5 – 8, early stage is sessile, later long exerted, 

about 5-6 mm long. Female flowers about 6-7mm; calyx lobes 5, petals 5, roundish, 

slightly  exceeding  the  calyx  lobes  and  wider  than  these,  white;  disk  thick,  yellow; 

ovay  on  disc  2-3  lobed  surrounded  by  5-8  staminodes;  style  1  in  the  center  of  the 

ovary lobes, 5 mm long; stigma 2. Fruit 2-lobed, only one develops (rarely3) to egg 

shape,  up  to  5.0  x  3.0  cm,  some  are  edible  depending  on  the  thickness  of  the  flesh 

(aril) covering the seed. 

 

Distribution: Pometia is a pantropic genus. Its distribution extends from Ceylon, the 

Adamans throughout  Malesia  to  Samoa.  Few  scattered  in  N. Siam,  S.  Yunan, Indo-

China and Formosa. 

 

Ecology: Typical rain forest genus of low altitude, generally occurring below 500 m, 

rarely to 1,000 m. (highest record: 1,700 m in Atej) on limestone or loamy soils. Not 

so dominant in the forest in West Malaysia; in Malaya mainly riverine; in Borneo and 

Sumatra  occasionally  in  fresh  water  swamp  forests;  in  New  Guinea  not  seldom 

dominant in forests partly under human influence. 


 

12

 



Notes: The genus is recognized by two species i.e. P. pinnata and P. ridleyiPometia 

is well known for its witches broom which occur nearly in all the taxa (species and 

forms) that can be recognized from long distances. Witches – brooms originate from a 

leaflet  (Bos  1975).  The  malformation  is  caused  by  viruses.  This  characteristic  also 

appears on inflorescences.  

 

Key to Pometia trees in Papua New Guinea 

 

1.0 



Bole rarely rounded, shorter in length, highly buttressed and sharply flanged. 

Fruits having thicker aril (edible flesh) 

 

2.0 


Leaflets symmetrical, glabrous 

 

3.0 



First  basal  pair  auriculiform  and  suborbicular,.  Only  first  few 

leaflets overlapping, later elliptic …P.pinnata forma glabra 

 

3.0 


Leaflets  overlapping  all  along  the  rachis  …form.  nov.(NGI 

relatives) 

 

1.0 



Bole often rounded, longer in length, buttresses low and thickly flanged. Fruits 

with thin aril (not edible flesh) 

 

2.0 


Leaflets very symmetrical, slightly overlapping the rachis ,often hairy 

……………………………………………..P. pinnata form tomentosa 

 

4.0 Leaflets asymmetrical, distinctly falcate. Leaflets over lapping the 



rachis all along ………………………. P..pnnata form pinnata 

 

4.0 



Leaflets  over  lapping  only  at  the  base,  gradually  becoming 

parallel at the tip  …………………P. pinnata form repanda 



 

 

13

2.2 Description of the Forms 



 

Pometia pinnata form pinnata Jacobs 

 

Tree, 20–30 m tall; twigs terete, hairy, when older completely glabrous or almost so, 



leaves  30–40  cm  long  (up  to  100  cm);  lealets  corioceous,  10–11  pairs,  fairly 

symmetrical, oblong to elliptic, rarely ovate, 20–25 x 7–8 cm, first pair usually sub – 

orbicular to elliptic, clasping the rachis–like stipules; base oblique, shallowly cordate; 

tip  acute,  sometimes  acuminate;  inflorescence  terminal  in  glabrous  or  finely 

pubescent panicles, 30–50 am long; fruits lobes 5–6 cm across, flattened to globose, 

usually only one lobe is fully developed, 1.5–3 .5 x 1–3 cm ; exocarp leathery, inner 

fibrous–meaty, white or reddish; aril fleshy, white, pleasant tasting; seed irregular red-

brown with a large hilum. 

 

Field  characters:  heavily  buttress,  thin  or  sharply  flanged,  up  to  3m  or  more;  bole 

often not so straight, 50 –60 cm diameter, rarely rounded reaching up to 20 m before 

the  first  limb;  bark  more  or  less  smooth,  dark  brown,  branching  low  with  heavily 

green foliage. 

 

Distribution: Same as that of the genus. In Papua New Guinea occurring in almost all 

coastal regions. 

 

Ecology:  Predominent  in  primary  forest  on  all  kinds  of  soil,  river  banks  or  well 

drained limestone. 

 

Note: Tree having long straight bole lengths, very good volume of sawn timber can be 

extracted from. The fruits with thin aril (flesh) so they are not much favoured. 

 

Pometia pinnata form tomentosa (Bl.) Jacobs 

 

Tree, 30–40m tall, twigs terete, rusty– brown hairy; leaves 20–30cm long; leaflets 5-7 

pairs per rachis; blade falcate, assymetrical, sometimes ovate to lanceolate, 15–25 x 6-

9  cm;  mature  leaflets  glabrous,  junvenile  leaflets  pubescent;  margin  toothed  but 

sometimes  faintly;  base  cordate  to  obtuse,  not  overlapping  the  rachis,  apex  acute; 


 

14

Inflorescence densely pubescent, 20-40 cm long pendulous; fruit 3–3.5 x 2–2.5 cm , 



sub-globose or ellipsoidal , red or brown when ripe, seeds oblong; testa reddish. 

 

Distribution  (Based  on  the  material  studied):  Bulolo  in  the  Morobe  province  and 

Kerema in the Gulf province. 

 

Ecology: Primary lowland rain forest on alluvial flats or foothills and hilly slopes up 

to 200 m. 

 

Notes: Buttress bluntly flanged, rarely up to 2  m or more; usually straight, rounded 

bole up to 30 m before the first limb; outer bark light brown, rough surface, branching 

less dense but usually heavily foliage lighter or somewhat yellowish green. 



 

Pometia pinnata form glabra (Bl.) Jacobs 

 

Tree 17–40 m tall, dbh  60–70 cm. Branchlets when young brown-puberulose. . Leaf 



rachis 30 – 80 cm (or perhaps longer), sometimes sparsely puberulous. Leaflets 

coriaceous, 8-12 pairs, 4 mm stalked; the first (basal) pair like auricles, up to 3 cm 

long and suborbicular to elliptic, persistent; the largest more or less 25-32 x 8 (-13) 

cm, parallel sided; base subcordate to sometimes blunt, top sub acuminate; midrib and 

nerves always glabrous above, often sparsely puberulose beneath, nerves 18-25 pairs; 

marginal teeth minute to sometimes coarse. Inflorescence stiff and rather lax 30 –60 

cm long, rather densely brown-pubescent, the main branches subtended by 1-2 pairs 

of reduced suborbicular leaflets like auricles, repeatedly branched. Fruit more or less 

3.5 x 2.5 –3 cm. 

 

Distribution: In Papua New Guinea occurring almost in all coastal regions as that of 



form pinnata. 

 

Ecology: Same as that of form pinnata 

 

Notes: Boles shorter in length than form pinnata and form tomentosa. Fruits are larger 

with thicker aril and are edible.  



 

15

Pometia  pinnata form  repanda Jacobs 



 

Tree 23-35 m tall, dbh 40-75 cm. Innovation long glossy–brown pubescent, very early 

glabrescent. Branchlets not or shallowly grooved, 5mm thick. Leaf rachis slender, 13–

27  cm  (-  60  cm),  with  6–8  leaflets  on  either  side.  Leaflets  subcoriaceous,  the  first 

(basal)  pair  up  to  1  cm  long  and  falcate,  the  next  1–2  pairs  somewhat  longer  but 

generally  the  lower  leaflets  caducous

the  other  leaflets  mostly  not  overlapping  one 



another,  the  largest  12–18.5  x  4–5  (-7)  cm,  mostly  narrowed  to  both  ends  or 

sometimes parallel–sided; base acute to rarely sub cordate, top gradually acuminate; 

nerves 13–17 pairs, reddish tinged; marginal incisions 1 – 2 mm deep, rather repand 

than  dentate;  surface  s  glabrous  all  over.  Inflorescence  stiff,  more  or  less  sparsely 

woolly pubescent, 15–30 cm long, rather densely branched, the branches fairly short, 

not subtented by reduced leaflets, Fruits 2–2.5 x 1.5 cm. 

 



Yüklə 245,53 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə