And its trade in papua new guinea



Yüklə 245,53 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix25.03.2017
ölçüsü245,53 Kb.
#12510
1   2   3

Distribution:  Philippines  to  New  Guinea  and  Aru  Islands.  In  New  Guinea  reported 

from Popondetta Northern province only. 



 

Ecology: Same as Pometia pinnata form pinnata. 

 

Notes: Previously known as Pometia acuminata

 

Pometia pinnata form nov. (NGI relative) 

This  form  resembles  form  pinnata  and  form  tomentosa  in  many  of  the  characters 

accept that the bole length is shorter and the fruits are large and edible as that of form 



glabra. 

 

Distribution: New Britain, Manus, New Ireland. 

 

3.0 General Ecology 

Pometia pinnata, commonly known in PNG as taun, is a highly valued timber species. 

It is a large tree generally growing to 50 m in height and 1.2 m in diameter (Havel, 

1975). The tree is found in the lowlands of PNG, at altitudes ranging from 75 to 800 

m  above  sea  level  (Damas,  1993)  particularly  in  areas  with  mean  annual  rainfall 



 

16

ranging  from  1500  to  5000mm  and  mean  annual  temperature  range  of  22-28



o

(Thomson and Thaman, 2006).  



Generally,  Pometia  or  taun  tolerates  a  wide  edaphic  range  but  attains  its  best 

development  on  well  drained  fertile  loams  and  clay.  In  PNG,  the  commercially 

important form of f. pinnata is found on better drained sites, whereas the poorer forms 

mainly occur on river flats and low-lying areas (Havel, 1975; Thomson and Thaman, 

2006).  

In lowland forests of Papua New Guinea stockings of commercial sized trees (50 cm 

dbh  and  above)  are  quite  high.  In  rather  undisturbed,  closed  forests,  seedlings 

establish  and  persist  with  slow  growth.  The  species  regenerates  by  discontinuous 

recruitment, favored by small-scale disturbance, but not large gaps. In forest situations 

the species has a moderately good self-pruning ability, as frequently exhibited by the 

long,  clear  bole  in  mature  trees.  In  open  situations  young  trees  tend  to  develop  a 

coarse, low branching habit and often have poor self-pruning. 

 

Pometia density varies within its distributional range. The lowest density was reported 

in  Western  Province  while  the  highest  were  recorded  in  parts  of  New  Ireland  and 

Madang  Provinces  (Hammermaster  and  Saunders,  1995).  Inventory  data  in  lowland 

rain forests of Managalas Plateaux, Oro Province indicate a range of 8 to 13 trees per 

hectare  (Table  1)  (Piskaut,  2005)  which  on  average  is  anticipated  in  most  potential 

production forests in PNG. 

 

Table 1. Enumeration of Pometia pinnata within the Managalas Plateau, Northern Province (Piskaut, 



2004, 2005). 

 

 



Kuia

Kadejama

Putei

Pongani 

No. Individuals 

6

6

4



No. merchantable. 

individivuals 

3

2



3

 



 

 

 



 

Total Area (m

2



2250



2500

2500


2500 

Area (ha) 

0.23

0.25


0.25

0.25 


Tree density/ha 

26.67


24

16



Timber density/ha 

13.33


8

12



 

 

17

In  terms  of  population  structure,  there  appeared  to  be  adequate  recruitment  into  the 



merchantable  form.  Based  on  diameter  structure,  approximately  5  to  20  percent  of 

Pometia trees are potential timbers (Figure 3) in the next cutting cycle of 40 years. 

0

5



10

15

20



25

30

<20

20-29

30-39


40-49

50-59


60-69

>70


Diameter class (cm)

Fr



eq

ue

nc



y

 

Figure  3.  Diameter  distribution  of  Pometia  pinnata  at  Managalas  Plateau,  Northern 



Province.  

 

 



4.0 Growth and Development  

 

Early height growth is fast, about 2 m per annum on sites with good soil fertility and 

moisture levels and intermediate to high light levels. After the first few years, growth 

rates are typically 1–2 m in height per year. In field trials established at Kerevat, 

Dami and Madang, the annual stem diameter increment range from 1.8-3.0 cm (Yelu, 

2001). Similarly, in the Solomon Islands the annual stem diameter increment was in 

the range of 1.6–2.5 cm, with growth declining with age. The fastest growing taun 

trees attained a diameter at breast height (dbh) of 30 cm in 13–16 years but had poor 

form and short boles to only 4–8 m. 

 

The species copes well with competition from other trees and crops, but growth will 



slow in more heavily shaded conditions. 

 


 

18

5.0 Conservation status 

 

According to the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Center (UNEP-WCMC) 



taun is not listed as vulnerable species. However, given heavy exploitation it may be 

wise to list the species under CITES.  

 

6.0 Harvesting and Trade 

 

 

6.1 Forest inventories and logging acquisition 

 

Accessing information on forest resources and up to date forest inventories is difficult 



in  Papua  New  Guinea.  Any  datasets  generated  from  sampling  plots  in  logged  or 

unlogged forest areas are not readily shared between institutions. The lack of a central 

repository  for  such  information  made  information  gathering  for  this  desktop  study 

difficult.  Information  on  commercial  timber  stands,  density  and  volume  is  therefore 

limited  and  the  best  available  information  are  extracted  from  the  compilation  of 

inventory  data  as  presented  by  Hammermaster  and  Saunders  (1995)  and  those 

conducted  by  forest  developers  themselves  as  part  of  the  requirement  under  the 

Environmental Plan. Data on stand densities and volumes may not truly represent the 

actual  timber  stand.  For  instance,  the  timber  volume  datasets  as  presented  by 

Hammermaster  and  Saunders  (1995)  contain  extrapolations  for  areas  or  forest  types 

where data were not available. 

  

Taun is common and commercially exploitable volumes are reported in all coastal and 



island  provinces.  The  commercially  extractable  volume  of  taun  on  average  is 

estimated  at  around  15  million  cubic  meters  or  approximately  13%  of  all  potential 

timber  species  put  together.

 

These  figures  are  based  on  selected  timber  concession 



areas and do not represent the gross volume and density of taun in all forested areas in 

Papua New Guinea.  

 

The  current  accessible  and  productive  forest  types  are  low  altitude  forest  types  on 



uplands.  Table  2  below  gives  average  merchantable  taun  volumes  for  low  altitude 

forests compare to other lowland forest types. Note, the mean volumes for all timber 

species  appear  higher,  reflecting  assumed  estimations  for  forest  areas  where  data  is 


 

19

unavailable.  Similarly  the  taun  volumes  also  appear  lower  in  most  provinces.  For 



instance, in a study conducted at the foot of the Schrader Range, East Sepik Province, 

an average taun volume of 1.6 m

3

  was recorded in a 0.1 ha or 16 m



3

/ha.  


 

Overall, the merchantable taun volume varies from less than then 1 m

3

/ha in Western 



Province to 25 m

3

/ha in Madang. Other lowland forest types such as open woodland, 



forest on plains and fans, and swamp forests, appear to have more taun timbers than 

the more productive low altitude forest types. 

 

Table  2.  Comparison  of  merchantable  taun  volume  per  hectare  (m



3

/ha)  in  productive  low  altitude 

forests  on  uplands  and  other  low  altitude  forest  types  for  major  timber  resource  provinces  (data 

extracted from Hammermaster and Saunders,1995, otherwise as indicated). 

 

Province  



Productive low 

altitude forests on 

uplands (vol./ha) 

Other low altitude 

forest types 

(vol./ha) 

Mean vol./ha for 

all potential 

timber species   

North Solomons  

7.86 

5.40 


38.33 

New Ireland 

5.57 

8.98 


30.29 

East New Britain 

5.95 

6.03 


32.33 

West New Britain 

5.68 

8.34 


33.93 

Manus 


2.97 

56.50 



Milne Bay  

3.28 


2.95 

17.98* 


Central 

5.26 


4.40 

21.65* 


Gulf 

2.71 


2.29 

20.24* 


Oro 

2.88 


4.70 

81.69* 


Western 

1.48 


0.71 

15.33* 


West Sepik 

4.23 


3.34 

36.69 


East Sepik 

3.69 


3.96 

33.42 


Madang 

8.13 


24.83 

56.42 


Morobe 

9.17 


12.33 

55.00 


All Highlands 

3.29 


0.35 

42.50 


*  Volume from 2002 annual working (unpublished annual working plan reports, Southern Region). 

 

 

The  acquisition  of  potential  forest  areas  for  forest  development  follows  a  very  long 



process from landowner consultation through to the final issuing of the timber permit. 

The process referred to as the “Thirty Four Steps” (see Appendix I). According to the 

Forest Act 1991, all commercial harvesting of forest products require a permit issued 


 

20

by  the  PNGFA.  A  permit  is  required  regardless  of  whether  the  forest  products 



involved are grown on state, freehold or customary land. Different permits are issued 

by the PNGFA that are applicable to the type of forest project.  Important to the final 

approval and issuing of timber permits, the proponent or intending developer provides 

a forest working plan (FWP) and an Environmental Plan (EP) that takes into account 

the timber area’s topography, the resource density and biological environment of the 

area. These plans serve as the benchmark for sustainable management. 

 

The  extraction  of  taun and  other  timber species  in natural forests  follows  the  coupe 



logging method or volume based harvesting system. This is the recommended method 

based  on  sustained  yield  management.  Depending  on  the  stand  volume,  coupes  of 

varying sizes (from as low as 1000 ha to 15000 ha) are established. Sizes of coupes 

are determined by volume of timber on a per hectare basis. The volume of each coupe 

represents a 5 year cutting cycle and is divided into subunits called set-ups. Each set-

up  covers  approximately  150  hectares  of  forests  and  represents  a  one  year  cutting 

cycle. 

 

There are no set policies specific to the exploitation of taun and other timber species 



classified under the MEP group 1 timbers. However, the government has put in place 

general  guidelines  controlling  the  exploitation  and  export  of  taun.  Base  on  timber 

volumes  in  logging  concessions,  the  Forest  Authority  determines  the  maximum 

allowable  exploitation  or  endorsed  volume  to  be  extracted.    The  endorsed  volume 

differs  for  each  timber  species  or  species  group  and  varies  from  area  to  area  (SGS 

Reports 2002-2005) depending on stand densities and volumes.  

 

6.2 Log Export  

 

The log export industry in PNG initially focused on the Islands region because of high 



stocking  densities  and  easy  access.  Although  the  area  under  concession  quadrupled 

between  1982  and 1991 there was  no  corresponding  increase  in  reported  log  export 

volumes. 

 

The  log  export  of  all  commercial  trees  peaked  in  the  mid  1990’s  when  log  export 



levels  reached  about  3  million  m

3

  each  year.  However,  since  then  there  has  been  a 



 

21

steady decline in export volumes to a low of 1.5 million m



3

 in 2001. The years 2002 

to 2005 experienced a slight increase in log export levels reaching 2 million m

3

 (SGS 



Log Monitoring Reports: 2003-2004). This trend was very pronounced in taun (Figure 

4). This was probably attributed to resource rich concessions being logged out and the 

companies being forced into less desirable forest areas with lower stockings.  

 

It is difficult to ascertain the quantity of taun logs harvested in concession areas. The 



only  records  available  are  logs  in  shipments  that  were  declared  to  the  authorities. 

Since  the  engagement  of  SGS  in  the  mid  1990s,  there  was  a  sharp  reduction  in 

undeclared  log  shipments and  deliberate  misidentification  of  species  which  has  cost 

millions of kina in lost revenue to the government.  

 

0

2



4

6

8



10

12

14



1997

1998


1999

2000


2001

2002


2003

2004


2005

Year


Pe

rc

en



t V

ol

um



(m

3)



 

Figure  4.  Percentage  volume  of  taun  exported  from  1997  to  2005 

(www.pngfia.org.pg, SGS Log Monitoring Report, 2002-2005). 

 

Taun contributed between 5 to 12% of the total timber volume exported between 1997 



and  2005.  There  was  a  slight  decline  in  exported  taun  logs  but  increased  again 

towards 2005 (Figure 4). From March 2004 and to March 2005, a total of 145,000 m

of  taun  was  exported  with  a  value  of  US$9.7  million.  In  comparison  to  all  timber 



species,  taun  accounted  for  12%  of  the  total  revenue  of  US$115  million  collected 

during 2004 (Figure 5).  

 


 

22

Burkella, 3.4



Calophyllum, 15.8

Dillenia, 4.5

Erima, 6.6

Grey Canarium, 2.3

Hekakoro, 0.0

Kw ila, 2.6

Lophopetallum, 0.8

Malas, 12.9

PNG Mersaw a, 9.5

PNG w alnut, 2.2

Pencil cedar, 6.5

Red Canarium, 5.3

Red Planchonella, 0.3

Taun, 12.2

Teak, 5.4

Terminalia, 8.6

White Planchonella, 1.1

 

Figure 5. Percentage revenue contribution of major timber species exported in 2004 



(Source: SGS Log Monitoring Report 2004). 

 

6.3 Processed Taun Export 

 

Table 3 gives a summary of processed taun timbers exported in 2001, 2002 and 2004 



in  Papua  New  Guinea  alone.  Total  export  volume  varies  from  year  to  year  as 

determine  by  market  forces.  In  2001  a  total  of  635  m

3

  of  processed  taun  were 



exported  to  Australia,  New  Zealand,  United  States  and  Vietnam.  In  2004  only  two 

countries imported processed taun; Australia and Japan.  



 

23

Table 3. Export of processed taun from 2001 to August 2004 . 



 

Country 

US$/m3 

Volume (m3) 

FOB $ 

 

2001 

Australia  

244


370

90,280


Japan 

230


65

14,950


New Zealand  

392


4

1,568


New Zealand 

304


151

45,904


United States 

613


4

2,452


Vietnam 

345


41

14,145


Total 

635

169,299

 

2002 

 

 

 



Australia  

295


308

90,729


Canada 

525


7

3,468


New Zealand  

272


178

48,333


Total 

493

142,530

 

2004 

Australia 

359

18

6,432



Japan 

69

1,200



82,800

Total 

1,218

89,232

Source: www. fiapng.com. 

 

 

6.4 Trade Flow   



 

The  major  trade  flow  for  taun  based  on  SGS  Log  Export  Monitoring  statistics  are 

presented in Figure 6. China is by far the main importer of tropical logs followed by 

Japan,  and  Korea.  Up  to  90%  of  PNG  sawn  logs  were  exported  to  China  between 

2004 and March 2005. Of this total up to 60% were taun timbers.  

 

 



 

24

 

 

Figure 6. Trade flow in the international market of taun logs from PNG. 



 

Of  the  processed  logs,  Australia  and  New  Zealand  are  the  two  biggest  importers  of 

taun  (Table  3).  The  processed  taun  are  mostly  exported  as  rough  timbers,  beams, 

flitches and as square logs. 

 

6.5 Export Discrepancies 

 

As taun is common throughout the island of New Guinea, and the satellite islands it is 



anticipated  that  a  stocking  of  at  least  8-13  merchantable  stems  would  occur  in  a 

hectare. Current export records for January and March 2005 show that 7 to 11 logging 

companies  were  actively  exporting  taun  timbers  (SGS  Log  Export  Monitoring 

Reports,  2005).  The  biggest  exporters  include  Rimbunan  Hijau  (PNG)  Ltd,  Low 

Impact  Logging  Ltd,  Vanimo  Jaya Ltd,  Ambogo  Sawmill  Ltd,  Cakara  Alam (PNG) 

Ltd and Kerawara Ltd.  

 


 

25

However, within the same period these companies also recorded high discrepancies in 



shipment records (Table 4).  

 

Table 4. Taun export discrepancies in volume exported for January and March 2005. 



 

SGS 

Ref. 

no. 

Logging Company 

Area 

Permitted 

Volume 

(m

3



Shipped 

Vol. 

(m

3



Percentage 

Discrepancy 

8607  Low Impact Logging Ltd  BUHEM 

200 

481.46 


140.7 

8537  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd   ARAWE 

100 

181.86 


81.9 

8522  WTK Realty 

VANIMO 

500 


797.77 

59.6 


8461  Rimbunan Hijau (PNG) 

VAILALA 


150 

199.68 


33.1 

8536  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd 

ARAWE 

300 


353.72 

17.9 


8546  Ambogo Sawmill Ltd 

KUMUSI 


3100 

2546.47 


-17.9 

8538  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd 

ARAWE 

370 


255.50 

-30.9 


8760  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd 

ARAWE 


40 

179.34 


348.3 

8743  Low impact Logging Ltd  BUHEM 

100 

405.01 


305.0 

8715  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd 

ARAWE 

165 


256.21 

55.3 


8746  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd 

ARAWE 


260 

344.61 


32.5 

8720  Tutuman Dev. Ltd 

CEN. NIP 

1333.67 


1051.93 

-21.1 


8727  Rimbunan Hijau (PNG) 

VAILALA 


130 

59.99 


-53.9 

8691  Cakara Alam (PNG) Ltd 

ARAWE 

15 


4.71 

-68.6 


Source: SGS Log Export Monitoring, March and April 2005 

 

These discrepancies raise some questions for instance: 



 

  the validity of the forest inventory survey – whether it was a case of over or 

underestimation of timber volumes.  

  elements  of  illegal  logging  where  companies  are  encroaching  into  areas 

outside the demarcated boundaries. 

  volumes below  approved  permitted  volumes  may  imply  intentional  lumping 

with  lower  grade  logs.  An  interview  with  a  former  forester  with  a  logging 

company confirms this usual but regular practice.  

 

It  is  worth  noting  that,  logging  companies  employ  certified  forestry  officers  who 



conduct  inventory  survey,  prepare,  organize  and  supervise  log  exports.  Often 

 

26

prepared export documents comprising species lists and volumes may be knowingly 



altered to favour the log exporters. 

7.0 Management and Regulation 

 

The fourth goal of the Papua New Guinea Constitution which states 

 

 “….for  Papua  New  Guinea’s  natural  resources  and  environment  to  be 



conserved and used for the collective benefit of us all, and to be replenished 

for the benefit of future generations.” 

 

This is the cornerstone for forest policy formulation that ensures forest resources of 



the  country  are  used  and  replenished  for  the  collective  benefit  of  all  Papua  New 

Guineans now and for future generations.  

 



Yüklə 245,53 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə