And its trade in papua new guinea



Yüklə 245,53 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/3
tarix25.03.2017
ölçüsü245,53 Kb.
#12510
1   2   3

7.1 Statutory Requirements 

 

The management and regulation of taun falls under the Forestry Act 1991 as amended 

in 1993, 1996, 2000, and 2005. This Act was introduced in response to the findings of 

a  Commission  of  Inquiry  in  the  1989  that  exposed  widespread  mismanagement  and 

corruption  in  the  forestry  sector.  The  Act  introduced  a  completely  new  statutory 

framework  for  the  management  and  control  of  forest  harvesting  operations  and 

established  the  PNG  Forest  Authority  as  the  principle  regulatory  agency.  Key 

requirements in the Act are



 

 

Conservation  and  renewal  of  forest  resources  as  an  asset  for  succeeding 



generations 

 

Administration  of  the  management,  development  and  protection  of  forest 



resources by the PNG Forest Authority 

 

Development of forest resources only in accordance with the National Forest 



Plan 

 

Timber harvesting allowed only under a permit or authority issued under the 



Act 

 

Other forest industry activities to be regulated by licenses 



 

Registration of all forest industry participants 



 

27

 



The  Act  also  provides  a  detailed  framework  for  the  development  and  allocation  of 

timber  harvesting  rights  and  gives  powers  to  enforce  the  Act  against  defaulting 

companies and individuals. 

 

7.2 Informed Consent 



 

In Papua New Guinea, local populations retain legal control of land under a system 

designated as ‘customary land tenure.’ Under this system, the rights to manage forest 

resources and to harvest and sell timber are bound to the land and are clearly vested in 

the people and not the State. 

 

The Forestry Act 1991 clearly states that the rights of customary owners of the forest 

resource ‘shall be fully recognized and respected in all transactions. Under the Act, 

the  first  stage  in  the  development  of  a  timber  harvesting  project  is  for  the  State  to 

acquire the forest management rights from the forest owners. This is done through a 

contract known as a Forest Management Agreement (FMA) that must be in writing. A 

FMA is a  contract between forest owners and  the PNG Forest Authority, where the 

forest  owners  agree  to  their  forest  being  managed  on  a  long-term  basis  for  sustain 

wood production.   Note, FMA does not set out all the monetary and other benefits the 

landowners will receive in return for giving logging and marketing rights to the State. 

These benefits are outlined in the Project Agreement (PA). A PA is a contract with the 

developer/investor and the PNG Forest Authority.   

 

Regardless of the type of contract being sorted, it is the basic tenant of the ‘Law of 



Contract’ that binds all stakeholders in partnership. Thus, when landowners give their 

agreement  in  a  legally  binding  contract  they  must  be  giving  ‘free  and  informed’ 

consent.  This  means  that  they  understand  the  nature  of  the  contract  and  their  rights 

and obligations under its terms. 

 

However, given low levels of literacy and general education, effective communication 



presents special challenges to those seeking to obtain customary rights.  

 

 



 

28

7.3 Sustained Timber Yield 



 

The requirement in the Forestry Act for forest resources to be ‘conserved and renewed 

as  an  asset  for  succeeding  generations’  has  been  interpreted  in  the  National  Forest 

Policy emphasizing that timber harvesting be managed on a sustained yield basis.  

 

7.4 Harvesting Regulations 

 

Compliance  with  harvesting  regulations  and  other  requirements  relating  to  the 

planning and management of field operations is a key parameter in the assessment of 

the legality of forestry projects. 



 

Papua New  Guinea’s policies,  laws and regulations relating to  the  administration of 

forest  management  provide  a  detailed  framework  for  the  planning  and  conduct  of 

harvesting  operations  and  post-harvest  assessments.  This  includes:  requirements  for 

detailed  five-year  and  annual  working  plans;  compliance  with  a  Logging  Code  of 

Practice  and  key  standards  governing  harvesting  operations,  road  construction  and 

post-harvest treatments; and approved Environmental Plans. 

 

7.5 Contractual Requirements 

 

Forest  management  in  general  and  timber  harvesting  operations  in  particular  are 



underpinned  by  a  series  of  contractual  relationships  between  the  key  stakeholders: 

resource owners, the State, the licensed holder of the timber harvesting rights and the 

logging  company.  The  exact  set  of  contracts  to  be  found  in  any  one  forest 

management project can vary depending on the legislation that applied at the time the 

project was initiated, the form of the resource-owner mobilization, the type of license-

holding entity and the size of the harvesting operation.  



 

29

However, whatever the exact form of the contractual relationship, there is always at 



the core a series of obligations that the logging company owes to the resource owners, 

whether  directly  or  indirectly,  that  are  to  be  performed  in  return  for  the  right  to 

harvest and remove timber. These obligations invariably include three key elements: 

 

1. Direct financial payments (royalties) 



2. Building of infrastructure 

3. Installation of timber processing facilities 



 

7.6 Environmental Plans 

 

A valid Environmental Plan for all timber harvesting operations is a legal requirement 

under  the  Environmental  Planning  Act  and  a  legal  prerequisite  to  the  issuing  of  a 

Timber Permit under the Forestry Act.  

 

7.7 Effectiveness of Forestry Act 

 

The effectiveness of the above summarized sections of the Forestry Act was recently 

reviewed with regard to compliance by current logging companies. Evidence from the 

reviews  indicates  that  although  all  timber  harvesting  operations  may  be  officially 

licensed, there are serious issues of legal non-compliance at almost every stage in the 

development  and  management  of  these  projects  (Forest  Trends,  2006).  For  these 

reasons  the  majority  of  forestry  operations  are  considered  illegal.  Most,  if  not  all 

companies  have  not  complied  with  the  national  laws  and  regulations.  The  most 

widespread and manifest problems are the failure to secure informed consent and the 

inability of the State to ensure sustained yield management in natural forest areas. In 

order to be regarded as ‘legal,’ a timber harvesting operation needs far more than just 

an official permit or license. It is generally expected that the operator must be able to 

demonstrate: 

 

  Broad compliance with prevailing legal principles in their instruments which 



underpin the operating rights; 

 

30

  A  general  observance  of  statutory  and  regulatory  controls  in  the  harvesting 



operation itself; and 

  A  more  general  conformity  to  the  legal  standards  governing  all  business 

operations in Papua New Guinea. 

 

8.0 Recommendations 

 

The following are offered as recommendations based on past experiences, the analysis 

presented above and possible loopholes in the forestry policies that can have negative 

effect on taun: 

 

  More  scientific  research  be  conducted  on  taun  to  address  the  following 



important areas: 

 

o  the  impact  of  exploitation  on  taun  population.  This  includes  a  detail 



comparative  study  on  large  scale  and  low  impact  logging  such  as 

portable  sawmill,  to  validate  the  effects  on  taun  and  other  timber 

species.  

o  distribution and abundance and stand density studies. 

o  regeneration capacity in log-over areas and growth rates.  

o  silviculture treatment in natural forest.  

o  phenology studies, seed dispersal and germination. 

o  taxonomic revision of taun. 

o  genetic resource pool studies. 

o  create time series  model to predict  population trends base on volume 

and other physical and biological parameters. 

 

  There  is  downward  trend  in  taun  volume  indicating  decline  in  population 



densities. Thus, there is urgent need to strengthen existing laws to control and 

regulate this high quality timber. 

 


 

31

  For every concession area that is under negotiation, a proper and more reliable 



forest  inventory  data  should  accompany  each  Forest  Working  Plan  and 

Environmental Plan. 

 

  Proper  and  more  frequent  monitoring  of  logging  operations  by  genuine 



government foresters. There have been instances where foresters employed by 

logging  companies  produce  and  make  false  declarations  on  shipping 

documents.  Documents  that  lump  group  1  timber  species  with  low  quality 

timbers thus increasing the risk of transfer pricing.  

 

  Forest  resource  data,  at  least  in  Papua  New  Guinea,  is  lacking  or  outdated. 



There  is  urgent  need  to  clearly  define  local  distribution,  density  and  volume 

and  population  viability  in  natural  forest  for  individual  timber  species. 

According  to  the  Forestry  Act  1991,  as  amended  in  1993,  1996,  2000,  and 

2005  the  PNGFA  should  promote  scientific  studies  and  research  into  forest 

resources towards maintaining ecological balance consistent with the national 

development objectives.  The PNG Forest Research Institute, the research arm 

of  PNGFA  is  poorly  funded  and  has  not  been  able  to  address  this  situation 

adequately. Other institutions that can assist in research include the University 

of Papua New Guinea,  University of Technology and Research based NGOs 

such as WCS, WWF, and TNC. 

 

  Identify  a  central  repository  for  all  information  relating  to  forest  resources, 



research  information  and  their  harvest.  This  information  should  be  accessed 

freely by the general public or any interested parties. 

 

  Better networking between stakeholders to facilitate information sharing.  



 

 

 



 

32

9.0 References 



 

 

Damas, K. 1993. Variation within Pometia (SAPINDACEAE) species in Papua New 

Guinea.  Proceedings  of  the  Biological  Society  Society.  Wau  Ecology 

Institute. 

 

Eddowes,  P.  J.    1977.  Commercial  Timbers  of  Papua  New  Guinea.  Forest  Products 



Research Centre, Department of Primary Industry, Government of Papua 

New Guinea. 

 

Forest Industry Association. Log statistics. www.fiapng.com.  



 

Forest  Trends,  2006.  Logging,  Legality,  and  livelihoods  in  Papua  New  Guinea: 



synthesis of official assessments of large scale logging industry, Vol. 1. 

www.forest-trends.org

. 76 p. 

 

Hammermaster, F. T. and J. C. Saunders; (1995). Forest Resources and Vegetation 



Mapping of Papua New Guinea. PNGRIS publication No. 4, CSIRO, 

Australia 

 

Havel, J. J. 1975. Training manual for Forestry College, Vol. 3 Forest botany, Part 2, 



botanical taxonomy. Papua New Guinea Department of Forests.  

 

Jacobs, M. (1962). Pometia (Sapindaceae), A Study in Variability. Reinwardtia 



vol.6(2): 109 – 144. 

 

Piskaut,  P.  (2004).  A  preliminary  vegetation  and  plant  survey  of  the  proposed 



Managalas Plateau Conservation Area. Report submitted to Partners with 

Melanesia (PwM), Port Moresby. 

 

Piskaut, P. (2005). Vegetation and plant survey of the proposed managalas plateau 



conservation area: Phase II report. Report submitted to Partners with 

Melanesia (PwM), Port Moresby. 

 


 

33

SGS, (2002-2005). Log export monitoring reports. Papua New Guinea Forest 



Authority. Department of Forest, Government of Papua New Guinea. 

 

Thomson, L.A.J and Thaman, R.R. (2006). Pometia pinnata. Species profile for 



Pacific Island Agroforestry. www.traditionaltree.org. 

 

White, K.J. (19760. Lowland rainforest regeneration in Papua New Guinea with 



reference to the Vanimo sub province. Tropical Forestry Research Note 

SR32. Papua New Guinea Department of Forest. 

 

Yelu, W. (2001). Effect of Tending on the growth of Pometia pinnata in Papua New 



Guinea. Pacific Islands Forest & Trees Magagine ( March edition). 

 


 

34

Appendix I 

 

The “Thirty Four Steps” is a step by step procedures of acquiring forest land for 



development purposes. 

 

1  



Landowner awareness campaign 

2  


Timber rights acquired through a Forest Management Agreement 

3  


Consent of customary landowners obtained 

4  


Certification of landowners consent and authenticity of their tenure 

5  


Ministerial approval 

6  


Development Options Study 

7  


Study provided to the Minister and local Forest Management Committee 

8  


Draft project guidelines prepared 

9  


Project guidelines approved 

10  


Project advertised 

11  


Project proposals lodged 

12  


Proposals referred to Provincial Committees for evaluation 

13  


Evaluation of project proposals 

14  


Invitation to provide further information 

15  


Detailed report to the National Board 

16  


Board consider the report and consults the Minister 

17  


Minister provides comments to the Board 

18  


Negotiation parameters set by Board and Provincial Committee 

19  


Board directs further negotiations 

20  


Project Agreement negotiated 

21  


Board considers the final draft Project Agreement 

22  


Agreement returned for further negotiations as necessary 

23  


Board consults with other stakeholders 

24  


Board obtains approval of the Minister for Finance 

25  


Project Agreement executed 

26  


Board recommends to the Minister to grant a timber permit 

27  


If Minister accepts the recommendation he/she invites the proponent to apply for a timber 

permit or 

28  

Refers the recommendation back to the Board if not accepted 



29  

Board considers the Ministers referral and makes a final recommendation 

30  

If the Minister accepts the recommendation he invites the proponent to apply for a timber 



permit 

31  


The Minister for Forest then grants a timber permit 

32  


If the Minister does not accept the recommendation it is referred to the National Executive 

Council 


33  

NEC can accept or reject the project proposals and give directions. If the Minister is directed 

to accept the recommendation he must invite the proponent to apply for a timber permit 

34  


If NEC rejects the proposal it is renegotiated or readvertised 

 

 



 

 

35

Appendix II 



 

Flowering, fruiting habits and other features of Pometia pinnata 

 

 

 

 



Plate 1: Flower habit of Pometia 

pinnata forma glabra. Photo: D. 

Kipiro, PNG FRI.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Plate 2: Fruiting habit of P.pinnata 



forma glabra. Fruit bearing form, 

inner flesh is thicker and is edible. 

Photo: D. Kipiro. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Plate 3. Fruiting habit of P. pinnata 



forma pinnata. Fruits inedible. Photo: 

D. Kipiro 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Plate 4. Dried fruits of P.pinnata forma 



glabra. Photo: D. Kipiro. 

 

 

 

36

 



 

Plate 5. P. pinnata f. tomentosa. Lower 

surface of leaflets and flower habit. 

Picture courtesy: B. Conn and D. 

Kipiro 

 

 



 

Plate 6. P. pinnata f. tomentosa. Upper 

surface of leaflets and habit. Picture 

courtesy: B. Conn and D. Kipiro 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Plate 7. Fruit habit of P.pinnata f. 



tomentosa. Puture courtesy: B. Conn 

and D. Kipiro. 

 

 

 



 

Plate 8. P. pinnata f. tomentosa. Bark 

Picture courtesy: B. Conn and D. 

Kipiro 


 


Yüklə 245,53 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə