Andreia c. Turchetto-zolet



Yüklə 0,66 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/5
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü0,66 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5

Phylogeography and ecological niche modelling in

Eugenia uniflora (Myrtaceae) suggest distinct

vegetational responses to climate change between the

southern and the northern Atlantic Forest

ANDREIA C. TURCHETTO-ZOLET

1

, FABIANO SALGUEIRO



2

, CAROLINE TURCHETTO

1

,

FERNANDA CRUZ



1

, NICOLE M. VETO

1

, MICHEL J. F. BARROS



1

, ANA L. A. SEGATTO

1

,

LORETA B. FREITAS



1

and ROG 

ERIO MARGIS

1,3


*

1

Programa de P



os-Graduacß~ao em Genetica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande

do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501970 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

2

Departamento de Bot



^anica, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Av. Pasteur

458, 22290-255 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

3

Centro de Biotecnologia e Departamento de Biof



ısica, UFRGS, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Predio

43431 sala 213, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Received 14 July 2015; revised 23 May 2016; accepted for publication 14 July 2016

In this study, we evaluate phylogeographic patterns and predictions of ecological niche modelling (ENM) for

Eugenia uniflora (Myrtaceae), a widely distributed taxon in the Atlantic forest domain, to understand the effect

of past climatic oscillations on the demographic history of this species. An analysis of phylogeographic population

structure and demography was conducted on E. uniflora from 46 localities in natural environments across the

distribution range of the species based on three plastid markers. ENM was also performed to predict suitable

environments and areas of dramatic decrease in future suitability for the species under distinct representative

concentration pathways (RCPs). Eugenia uniflora exhibited higher haplotype and nucleotide diversity in the

southern part of its distribution than in the northern part. Two divergent lineages were revealed in the

phylogenetic analysis of haplotypes, with an estimated divergence at c. 4.9 Mya. The populations in the northern

and central regions of the range probably experienced population growth, whereas populations in the southern

region are marked by historical demographic stability. ENM results indicate that the distribution of E. uniflora

was fragmented in cool periods and was broader and more connected during warm periods during Pleistocene.

The results suggest distinct evolutionary histories in southern to northern populations, indicating region-specific

responses to changes.

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS:

chloroplast DNA – geographical variation – pitanga – population

structure – South America.

INTRODUCTION

Investigating the evolutionary history of species can

lead to an increased understanding of the interac-

tions between past climatic events and the evolution-

ary processes that contributed to current patterns

of diversity (Hewitt, 2000; Duminil et al., 2010). In

this context, molecular phylogeographic approaches

facilitate an increased understanding of the role that

historical events play in the geographical patterns

of genetic variability within and among species

(Knowles & Maddison, 2002; Avise, 2009). Studies

combining

ecological

and

phylogenetic/phylogeo-



graphic analysis have provided information regard-

ing the origin and evolutionary history of species

(Wiens & Donoghue, 2004; Ricklefs, 2010) and

improved our understanding of the processes struc-

turing genetic variation across landscapes (Knowles,

2009; Chan, Brown & Yoder, 2011; Collevatti et al.,

2013; Alvarado-Serrano & Knowles, 2014; Diniz-filho

et al., 2014; Thode et al., 2014).

*Corresponding author. E-mails: rogerio.margis@gmail.com

and rogerio.margis@ufrgs.br

1

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016



Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016. With 5 figures

In South America, recent studies have combined

ecological niche modelling (ENM) and phylogeo-

graphic approaches, highlighting various patterns of

diversification and demographic histories in different

taxa (Carnaval & Moritz, 2008; Carnaval et al.,

2009, 2014; Martins, 2011; Collevatti et al., 2012;

Valdez & D’El

ıa, 2013). However, the impact of past

climatic changes on many Neotropical species has

yet to be explored. Further investigations of histori-

cal phylogeography on each specific biome and ecore-

gion in South America are fundamental in the

assessment of how species have responded to past

climatic and environmental changes and to predict

how they might cope with current and future

changes.


The Atlantic forest is the second largest tropical

forest


in

South America,

covering

an

area



of

> 1 000 000 km

2

along


the

Brazilian

coast

and


extending to eastern Paraguay and northeastern

Argentina (Joly et al., 1999; Oliveira-Filho & Fontes,

2000; Ribeiro et al., 2009). Complex factors including

strong seasonality, sharp environmental gradients

and orographically driven rainfall (resulting from

easterly tropical Atlantic winds) result in a diverse

landscape

in

this



ecoregion

(Joly


et al.,

1999;


Martins, 2011). This specific complex is referred to

as the Atlantic Forest Domain (AFD) (Joly et al.,

1999) and includes open, mixed and closed evergreen

forest and semi-deciduous and deciduous forests. The

evergreen forest runs along the coastline, covering

mountain


slopes

at

low



to

middle


elevations

(

≤ 1000 m), with semi-deciduous forest extending



across a plateau (usually

> 600 m) in the centre and

southeastern interior of Brazil (Morellato & Haddad,

2000; Oliveira-Filho & Fontes, 2000). Surveys of

terrestrial plant occurrences in the AFD have

demonstrated that species can occupy more than one

phytogeographical niche in this domain (Stehmann

et al., 2009; Barros & Morim, 2014). Previous studies

have suggested that the AFD was historically frag-

mented with open areas during the Pleistocene

(Behling, 1997, 1998, 2002; Lichte & Behling, 1999),

presenting widely isolated patches of forest (Ledru,

1998; Behling & Negrelle, 2001). Comparative phylo-

geography has aided in the identification of putative

refugia and zones of secondary contact for verte-

brates from the Brazilian Atlantic forest (Martins,

2011; Porto et al., 2012; Silva et al., 2012); however,

this type of information remains scarce for plant spe-

cies (Turchetto-Zolet et al., 2013). Moreover, phylo-

geographic studies of species in the AFD occupying

more than one phytogeographical region in this

domain may reveal useful information regarding how

such species coped with past climatic changes, and

how these events may have driven the evolutionary

history of populations.

Eugenia uniflora L., ‘pitanga’ or Brazilian cherry,

belongs to Myrtaceae, one of the most species-rich

angiosperm families in the Neotropics (Govaerts

et al., 2011). Eugenia uniflora grows in a variety of

phytogeographical regions in the AFD, including the

Atlantic forest (rainforest), semi-deciduous forest

(Oliveira-Filho & Fontes, 2000), steppe grassland

(Roesch et al., 2009) and the adjacent restinga

ecosystem (Scarano, 2002) from the northeastern to

southern regions of Brazil, northern Argentina and

Uruguay (Fig. 1A). Moreover, this species exhibits

several habits. For instance, it is a shrub or small

tree in the sandy coastal-plain vegetation near the

ocean in southeastern and northeastern Brazil (in

adjacent restinga) or a tree in the southern part of

the AFD (dense ombrophilous forest, steppe grass-

land,


pioneer

formation

and

riparian


forests)

(Oliveira-Filho & Fontes, 2000; Almeida, Faria & Da

Silva, 2012;

Lucas & B

€unger, 2015). In the south,

this species extends from the coast up to 400 km

inland (in riparian forests). Previous studies have

revealed the various biological properties of this spe-

cies (Da Silva et al., 2005; Oliveira et al., 2008;

Malaman et al., 2011; Santos et al., 2012; De Oli-

veira Jucoski et al., 2013; Rodrigues et al., 2013),

making this species a target for commercial exploita-

tion. Recent studies of this species using molecular

dating were performed to reveal its genetic diversity

and differentiation (Margis et al., 2002; Salgueiro

et al., 2004; Ferreira-Ramos et al., 2007, 2014) and

the regulation of gene expression and metabolic

pathways (Guzman et al., 2014). Nonetheless, phylo-

geographic studies have not yet been performed in

this species or other Myrtaceae, which are often

underrepresented

in

phylogeographic



studies

in

South America (Turchetto-Zolet et al., 2013).



The aim of this study was to investigate the phylo-

geographic and demographic history of E. uniflora

throughout its distribution to understand how past

climatic oscillations have effected its current genetic

variation. Particularly, this study aims to answer the

following questions: (1) How is the genetic diversity

of E. uniflora geographically distributed? (2) What

was the distribution range of E. uniflora during the

Quaternary glacial and interglacial periods? (3) Is

the genetic diversity of this species a result of past

habitat fragmentation or recent range expansion? (4)

Is there a common or distinct pattern of genetic vari-

ation and demography along its entire distribution?

MATERIAL AND METHODS

S

AMPLING AND



DNA

EXTRACTION

Samples of E. uniflora were collected from 46 locali-

ties (hereafter referred to as populations) across its

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

2

A. C. TURCHETTO-ZOLET ET AL.



distribution. Care was taken to collect only individu-

als from natural environments. Three hundred and

five individuals were collected, ranging from three to

14 individuals per population) (Table 1, Fig. 1B).

Representative voucher specimens were collected for

two individuals of E. uniflora and deposited in the

Instituto de Ci

^encias Naturais (ICN) Herbarium of

Department of Botany at the Federal University of

Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) under the numbers

ICN167404 and ICN167405.

The distance among populations ranged from 20 to

3300 km. Leaf samples were collected from each

individual and dried in silica gel. One individual

each from E. brasiliensis, Myrcianthes cisplatensis

(Cambess.)

O.Berg,

and


Myrcianthes

gigantea


(D.Legrand) D. Legrand (Myrtaceae), previously ana-

lyzed by Cruz et al. (2013), were included in the

analysis as outgroup. Total genomic DNA was iso-

lated from powdered leaves with liquid N

2

using the



Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide method (Doyle &

Doyle, 1990). The quantity and quality of DNA were

assessed by electrophoresis and visualization on

1.0% agarose gels.

DNA

SEQUENCING



The first step involved screening several markers to

locate polymorphisms. Plastid psbA

–trnH, trnS–trnG,

trnC


–ycf6 and trnL–trnF intergenic spacers and

rps16 and rbcL genes (Kress et al., 2005; Kress &

Erickson, 2007; Shaw et al., 2007) and nuclear ITS

(Schultz & Wolf, 2009) were tested in representative

samples of 50 individuals. The plastid psbA

–trnH,


trnS

–trnG and trnC–ycf6 intergenic spacers were

then selected to amplify in all 305 individuals. Then,

the molecular analysis was based on plastid DNA

markers that were chosen due to their ability to

reconstruct historical demographic events. Some

advantages of these markers are their coalescent

time and lack of recombination (Duminil et al.,

2010). These markers may provide important insight

into which processes have influenced modern genetic

diversity and how this occurred. The polymerase

chain reaction (PCR) was performed based on two

programs set according to the melting temperatures

of the primers as follow: psbA

–trnH, trnS–trnG,

trnC


–ycf6 and trnL–trnF (94 °C for 5 min, followed

by 35 cycles of 94

°C for 50 s, 50 °C for 50 s, and

72

°C for 50 s); rps16, rbcL and ITS (94 °C for



5 min, followed by 35 cycles of 94

°C for 50 s, 54 °C

for 50 s, and 72

°C for 50 s). Each 20 lL PCR reac-

tion included 10 ng genomic DNA, 2.5 mM MgCl

2

,



0.25 mM dNTP mix, 1

9 PCR buffer, 0.05 U Plat-

inum Taq DNA polymerase (Invitrogen, Carlsbad,

CA, USA) and 0.25

lM each primer. Nuclear and

plastid PCR products were sequenced from both ends

Figure 1. Maps relating to the geographical distribution and the study area of Eugenia uniflora in the Atlantic forest

domain. (A), Current occurrence records of E. uniflora used to generate and validate the ecologic niche models based on

field observations and databases. The colours represent the first component of PCoA (70% of variance) for which precipi-

tation variables and altitude were the main contributors. B, Distribution of plastid haplotypes (coloured circles) in

E. uniflora populations (white circles). Different colours were assigned for each haplotype according to the legend shown

on the left side of the figure. Circle size represents the sample size and circle sections represent the haplotype frequency

in each sampled population. For details on the population codes and localities, see Table 1. The dotted line on the map

indicates the northern and southern division of populations.

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF EUGENIA UNIFLORA

3


Table

1.

Sample



information.

Genetic


diversity

indices


and

neutrality

tests

for


plastid

DNA


regions

of

the



47

populations

of

Eugenia


uniflora

No.


in

Fig.


1B

Geographical

origin

(abbreviated



sample

site)


Latitude-Longitude

(S-W)


Phytogeographical

Region


(group)

Sample


size

Haplotype

Haplotype

diversity/

Nucleotide

diversity

Tajima’s

D

Fu’s



FS

1

Itamarac



a,

PE,


Brazil

(PERN)


07

°45


0

20

″–34



°49

0

31



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

13

H1



0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


2

Barra


de

Santo


Ant

^onio,


AL,

Brazil


(SANT)

24



0

58

0



–35

°30


0

32.76


Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

9

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

3S

~ao



Miguel

dos


Milagres,

AL,


Brazil

(SMMI)


15

0



54

0

–35



°22

0

18



0

68



Adjacent

Restinga


ecosystem

(N)


5

H

1



0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


4

Arraial


D’Ajuda,

BA,


Brazil

(ARRA)


16

°27


0

42

″–39



°03

0

43



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

5

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

5

Imbassa



ı,

BA,


Brazil

(IMBA)


12

°26


0

28

″–38



°00

0

0.5



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

6

Morro



de

S

~ao



Paulo,

BA,


Brazil

(MSPO)


13

°23


0

1″

–38



°54

0

32



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

7

Mucuri,



BA,

Brazil


(MUCR)

18

°04



0

02

″–39



°32

0

11



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

8

Tassimirim,



BA,

Brazil


(TASS)

13

°35



0

12

″–38



°55

0

53



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

3

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

9

Trancoso,



BA,

Brazil


(TRAN)

16

°35



0

22

″–39



°05

0

47



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

6

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

10

Praia



de

Barra


Nova,

ES,


Brazil

(BNOV)


18

°56


0

51

″–39



°44

0

26



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

11

S



ıtio

do

Caju,



ES,

Brazil


(CAJU)

18

°51



0

09

″–39



°45

0

21



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

12

Conceic



ß~ao

da

Barra,



ES,

Brazil


(CBAR)

18

°36



0

57

″–39



°44

0

02



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H1.



H2

0.6667


0.000359

1.6330


0.5400

13

Barra



do

Sahy,


ES,

Brazil


(SAHY)

19

°53



0

21

″–40



°05

0

23



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

14

Reserva



Ind

ıgena


Guarani,

ES,


Brazil

(GUAR)


19

°57


0

05

″–40



°10

0

01



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

3

H



3

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

15

Praia



de

Itaparica,

ES,

Brazil


(PITA)

20

°23



0

23

″–40



°18

0

52



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

16

Barra



da

Tijuca,


RJ,

Brazil


(BART)

23

°01



0

00

″–43



°26

0

00



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

12

H1



0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


17

Buzios.


RJ,

Brazil


(BUZI)

22

°45



0

20

″–41



°56

0

47



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

7

H1.



H4

0.2857


0.000154

À

1.0062



À

0.0947


18

Grumar


ı,

RJ,


Brazil

(GRUP)


23

°02


0

48

″–43



°31

0

11



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

14

H1



0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


19

Ilha


Grande,

RJ,


Brazil

(IGRA)


23

°11


0

00

″–44



°19

0

00



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

3

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016



Yüklə 0,66 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə