Andreia c. Turchetto-zolet



Yüklə 0,66 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/5
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü0,66 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5

4

A. C. TURCHETTO-ZOLET ET AL.



Tab

le

1.



Continu

ed

No.



in

Fig.


1B

Geographical

origin

(abbreviated



sample

site)


Latitude-Longitude

(S-W)


Phytogeographical

Region


(group)

Sample


size

Haplotype

Haplotype

diversity/

Nucleotide

diversity

Tajima’s

D

Fu’s



FS

20

Maca



e,

RJ,


Brazil

(MACA)


22

°17


0

35

″–41



°40

0

28



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

12

H1.



H4

0.1667


0.000090

À

1.1405



À

0.4757


21

Arraial


do

Cabo,


RJ,

Brazil


(ARRC)

22

°57



0

53

″–42



°00

0

53



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

3

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

22

Trindade,



RJ,

Brazil


(TRIN)

23

°20



0

43

″–44



°43

0

02



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

23

Praia



Seca,

RJ,


Brazil

(SECA)


22

°56


0

11

″–42



°18

0

39



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

5

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

24

Camburi,



SP,

Brazil


(CAMB)

23

°46



0

39

″–45



°39

0

15



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

5

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

25

Picinguaba,



SP,

Brazil


(PICI)

23

°21



0

24

″–44



°51

0

47



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

26

Prumirim,



SP,

Brazil


(PRUM)

23

°22



0

45

″–44



°57

0

41



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

27

Santiago,



SP,

Brazil


(SANG)

23

°48



0

46

″–45



°32

0

17



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

28

Praia



Vermelha,

SP,


Brazil

(PVER)


23

°30


0

33

″–45



°10

0

23



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

29

Praia



Mococa,

SP,


Brazil

(MOCO)


23

°34


0

19

″–45



°17

0

58



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

4

H1.



H5

0.5000


0.000809

À

0.7545



1.7161

30

Praia



de

Fortaleza,

SP,

Brazil


(FORT)

23

°31



0

37

″–45



°10

0

01



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

3

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

31

Jardim



Bot

^anico,


SP,

Brazil


(JBOT)

23

°38



0

44

″–46



°37

0

32



Dense


Ombrophylous

Forest


(N)

7

H1.



H5.

H6

0.6667



0.000718

À

1.3584



0.5409

32

Antonina,



PR,

Brazil


(ANTO)

25

°25



0

45

″–48



°42

0

42



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

3

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

33

Florian



opolis,

SC,


Brazil

(SFLP)


27

°26


0

33

″–48



°22

0

11



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

14

H1



0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


34

Bombinhas,

SC,

Brazil


(BOMB)

27

°12



0

08

″–48



°29

0

11



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

13

H1.



H7

0.2821


0.000608

À

0.4237



2.7797

35

Lagoa



Conceic

ß~ao,


SC,

Brazil


(LAFL)

27

°35



0

36

″–48



°26

0

08



Adjacent


Restinga

ecosystem

(N)

9

H



1

0.0000


0.000000

0.0000


0.0000

36

Derrubadas,



RS,

Brazil


(DERR)

27

°12



0

16

″–53



°51

0

18



Dense


Ombrophylous

Forest


(S)

10

H5.



H8

0.4667


0.000252

0.8198


0.8180

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF EUGENIA UNIFLORA

5


Tab

le

1.



Continu

ed

No.



in

Fig.


1B

Geographical

origin

(abbreviated



sample

site)


Latitude-Longitude

(S-W)


Phytogeographical

Region


(group)

Sample


size

Haplotype

Haplotype

diversity/

Nucleotide

diversity

Tajima’s

D

Fu’s



FS

37

Irai,



RS,

Brazil


(IRAI)

27

°11



0

24

″–53



°14

0

55



Dense


Ombrophylous

Forest


(S)

8

H5.



H9.

H10


0.6071

0.000424


0.0694

À

0.2236



38

Cac


ßapava

do

Sul,



RS,

Brazil


(CAPS)

30

°30



0

22

″–53



°28

0

22



Steppe


grassland

(S)


14

H5.


H11

0.1429


0.000077

À

1.1552



À

0.5948


39

Cac


ßapava

do

Sul,



RS,

Brazil


(CAPP)

30

°46



0

16

″–56



°54

0

36



Steppe


grassland

(S)


9

H

5



0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


40

Ijui,


RS,

Brazil


(IJUI)

28

°18



0

37

″–53



°55

0

39



Steppe


grassland

(S)


8

H5.


H14

0.4286


0.000924

À

0.5833



0.3512

41

Lagoa



de

Itapeva,


RS,

Brazil


(ITAP)

29

°24



0

18

″–49



°51

0

50



Pioneer


formation

(Coastal)

(S)

9

H7.



H12.

H13


0.4167

0.000539


1.3926

0.7581


42

Palmares


do

Sul,


RS,

Brazil


(PALM)

30

°14



0

44

″–50



°28

0

17



Pioneer


formation

(Coastal)

(S)

6

H5.



H7.

H12


0.7333

0.000934


0.6876

0.8952


43

Capivari,

RS,

Brazil


(CAPI)

30

°08



0

40

″–50



°30

0

42



Pioneer


formation

(Coastal)

(S)

11

H5.



H7.

H12


0.5818

0.000627


0.2431

À

0.4754



44

Gravata


ı,

RS,


Brazil

(GRAV)


29

°55


0

00

″–51



°53

0

00



Pioneer


formation

(Coastal)

(S)

5

H5.



H7.

H11


0.8000

0.000539


1.9122

3.6435


45

Torres,


RS,

Brazil


(TORR)

29

°21



0

16

″–49



°43

0

56



Pioneer


formation

(Coastal)

(S)

7

H1.



H7

0.5714


0.001232

0.4852


3.1494

46

Corrientes,



Argentina

(ARGE)


26

°28


0

20

″–58



°52

0

08



Steppe


grassland

(S)


8

H15


0.0000

0.000000


0.0000

0.0000


Total

305


0.5508

0.001023


À

0.5615


À

2.5916


AL,

Alagoas;


BA,

Bahia;


ES,

Espirito


Santo;

PR,


Paran

a;


PE,

Pernambuco;

RJ,

Rio


de

Janeiro;


RS,

Rio


Grande

do

Sul;



SC,

Santa


Catarina;

SP,


S

~ao


Paulo.

Northern


group

(N),


Southern

group


(N).

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

6

A. C. TURCHETTO-ZOLET ET AL.



by dideoxy chain-termination using a BigDye Kit

(Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA), accord-

ing to the manufacturer’s instructions, and run on

an ABI-3100 automatic sequencer (Applied Biosys-

tems). All fragments were sequenced in the forward

and reverse directions and detected polymorphisms

were validated by visually checking the original

chromatograms. Sequences were deposited in the

GenBank database (accession numbers KP719023

KP719085) (Table S1).



Multiple sequence alignments were obtained using

MUSCLE (Edgar, 2004) implemented in MEGA 6

(Tamura et al., 2013). All analyses were performed

using the nucleotide sequences of concatenated

plastid DNA regions (psbA

–trnH, trnC–ycf6 and

trnG

–trnS).


G

ENETIC DIVERSITY

,

POPULATION STRUCTURE AND



PHYLOGEOGRAPHIC PATTERN

Standard diversity indices including nucleotide (pi)

and haplotype (h) diversities for individual and over-

all populations and analysis of molecular variance

(AMOVA, Excoffier, Smouse & Quattro, 1992) were

performed in ARLEQUIN 3.5.1.2 software (Excoffier

& Lischer, 2010). The AMOVA was conducted using

1000 permutations among collection sites and

Φ

ST

(pairwise differences). The occurrence of phylogeo-



graphic structures was inferred by testing for differ-

ences between G

ST

and N


ST

using PERMUT 2.0

(Pons & Petit, 1996) with 1000 permutations. G

ST

coefficients were dependent on haplotype frequen-



cies, whereas N

ST

considers sequence differences



between the haplotypes and the genetic distance

between them. Thus, an N

ST

value that is higher



than the G

ST

value indicates that closely related



haplotypes are observed more frequently in a given

geographical area than would be expected by chance

(Pons & Petit, 1996).

Bayesian analysis of population structure using

BAPS v6 (Corander, Sir

en & Arjas, 2008; Cheng

et al., 2013) was employed to analyse the population

genetic structure by clustering sampled individuals

into groups. This method is based on the Markov

chain Monte Carlo simulation approach to group pop-

ulation samples into variable user-defined numbers

(K) of clusters. The BAPS analysis was used to parti-

tion the populations in a number of K groups using

spatial information to detect the most likely genetic

structure among the 46 populations (Cheng et al.,

2013). This method was conducted using two to 46

groups (K), with ten replicates for each K value. The

optimal K cluster population partition was deter-

mined by the highest marginal log-likelihood.

Genealogical relationships among haplotypes were

estimated with the median-joining method (Bandelt,

Forster & R

€ohl, 1999) implemented in NETWORK

4.2.0.1 (available at www.fluxus-engineering.com).

Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates

of haplotypes were performed using a Bayesian

approach, as implemented in BEAST 1.8.2 (Drum-

mond et al., 2012). The priors used included the

birth

–death model, the GTR+I+G model with four



gamma categories and the relaxed molecular clock.

The substitution model was selected by Akaike infor-

mation criterion (AIC) implemented in jModelTest

0.1.1 (Posada, 2008). The substitution rate used was

3.6

9 10


À10

(

Æ5.4 9 10



À11

) substitutions per site per

year, as previously estimated for plastid regions of

Myrtaceae from South America (Thornhill & Mac-

phail, 2012). Two independent analyses of 10

8

gener-



ations were run. The convergence of the Markov

chains was checked and effective sample sizes

(ESS

> 200) confirmed in TRACER 1.6 (Rambaut



et al., 2014). TreeAnnotator, part of the BEAST soft-

ware package, was used to select the maximum clade

credibility tree. Statistical support of branches was

measured in Bayesian posterior probabilities (PP).

D

EMOGRAPHIC HISTORY



The demographic patterns of E. uniflora populations

were assessed using different approaches for the

plastid DNA sequence data sets. Two groups of neu-

trality tests were computed: (1) Tajima’s D (1989)

and Fu & Li’s (1993) F* and D*, which considers the

frequency of mutation (segregating sites); and (2)

Fu’s (1997) FS, which is based on haplotype distribu-

tion. In addition, mismatch distributions were simu-

lated under the sudden-demographic expansion and

spatial-demographic expansion models. All tests were

performed using ARLEQUIN and DnaSP (Librado &

Rozas, 2009). These analyses were performed in two

ways: first all 46 populations were considered sepa-

rately; and secondly, populations were grouped into

northern and southern groups (according to results,

see Fig. 1B). In addition, changes in population size

over time for the species as a whole and for northern

and southern groups were estimated using Bayesian

skyline plot analysis (BSP, Drummond et al., 2005)

performed in BEAST. The priors for this analysis

were the same as those used in the phylogenetic

analysis of haplotypes, as previously described. The

computation of BSP and convergence checking were

performed in TRACER.

LAMARC 2.1.8 (Kuhner, 2006) was used to esti-

mate the demographic parameters theta (

Θ), growth

rate (g) and migration rate (M). The estimates of

theta were calculated as

Θ = 2 lN


e

, where N

e

is

the effective population size and



l represents the

mutation rate per nucleotide and per generation.

Exponential growth rate (g) was calculated as

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF EUGENIA UNIFLORA

7


Θ

t

= Θ



now

exp(


Àgtl), where t is time in mutational

units. Migration rate was calculated as 2N

e

m/

Θ,



where m is the per generation migration rate. Baye-

sian estimation was used with ten initial chains of

100 000 steps (burn-in of 10 000) and two final

chains of 1 000 000 steps (burn-in of 100 000). The

priors were kept at the default setting. The analysis

was run twice and checked for convergence and

effective sample size values (ESS

≥ 200) using TRA-

CER. The most probable estimates (MPE) were

obtained as the credibility interval around the esti-

mate for each parameter.

E

COLOGICAL NICHE MODELLING



ENM was performed using MAXENT 3.3.3k (Phil-

lips, Dud

ık & Schapire, 2004; Phillips, Anderson &

Schapire, 2006), which consists of a machine-learn-

ing algorithm (Phillips et al., 2006). This algorithm

was preferred because it represents the most widely

used method of maximum entropy for ENM and has

been useful in present plant distributions and recon-

structions of potential distributions at the Pleis-

tocene Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (Waltari et al.,

2007; Carnaval & Moritz, 2008; Werneck et al.,

2012). Geographical coordinates for this analysis

were obtained from fieldwork and the following

online databases: Global Biodiversity Information

Facility (http://www.gbif.org; January 2015) and Spe-

cies Link (http://splink.cria.org.br; January 2015). To

ensure the utilization of native distribution coordi-

nates only, online data was filtered based on per-

sonal observations and the help of a taxonomist (Dr.

Marcos Sobral, Universidade Federal de S

~ao Jo~ao

Del-Rei). For modelling settings, the function ‘Auto

features’ was selected since different sample sizes of

the populations in the feature types and regulariza-

tion constants permitted the use of all feature types

by default. Distributions were modelled through the

‘cross-validate’

parameter,

applying

a

maximum



number of iterations at 1000, with ten replicates. All

other additional parameters were set to the default

settings in the software. For validation of models,

the area under receiver operating characteristic

curve (AUC-ROC or AUC) and the true skill statistic

(TSS), which selects the ‘max SSS’ for the calculation

of the TSS (Liu et al., 2013), were performed. The

identical threshold was also assumed for mapping

the predictions. Climatic variables represented the

average climates from 1950 to 2000 and consisted of

the 19 bioclimatic variables, with 2.5 arcminutes of

resolution (c. 4.5 km). Projections for past climate

conditions were also developed for three periods:

LGM c. 21 ka; LIG c. 120

–140 ka; and mid-Holocene

c. 6 ka. The layers representing all present and past

climatic periods were obtained from WORDCLIM

(http://www.worldclim.org/bioclim). To represent the

LGM climate, climatic simulations were derived from

coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models

(AOGCM), CCSM3 (Collins et al., 2006) and MIROC-

ESM (Braconnot et al., 2006) at identical resolutions.

ENM data were converted into binary predictions,

which developed a consensus projection in the LGM

through areas predicted in the CCSM and MIROC-

ESM. The resulting layers were converted into bin-

ary predictions based on the same ‘max SSS’ thresh-

old. A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) was

performed using PAST 2.16 (Hammer et al., 2001),

which searches for distinct niche properties in an

attempt to identify environmentally-based separation

of groups among different areas.

For future projections, AOGCMs were used for

2070 (average between 2061 and 2080) under two

representative concentration pathways (RCPs) for

CCSM4 and MIROC-ESM models. RCPs are climate

projections used in the Fifth IPCC Assessment,

downloaded from WorldClim 1.4 (available at http://

www.worldclim.org/CMIP5), which are already down-

scaled and calibrated (bias corrected). A consensus

was developed for 4.5 and for 8.5 RCPs through mul-

tiplying


the

predictions

based

on

CCSM4



and

MIROC-ESM climate data. For that, the continuous

predictions obtained were transformed for all models

into binary count layers, assuming the ‘max SSS’



Yüklə 0,66 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə