Andreia c. Turchetto-zolet



Yüklə 0,66 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/5
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü0,66 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5

proposed a c. 20 Ma divergence in Eugenia, plus the

realocation of Hexachlamys into tribe Myrteae. The

data in the current study is based only on plastid

markers and obtained c. 16 Mya in divergence

between Eugenia and Myrcianthes O.Berg. As Myr-

cianthes and Hexachlamys are genera distributed

preferentially inside the South American continent,

and the time of divergence in Eugenia is earlier than

Pleistocene events that influenced the coastal land-

scape, we suggest that E. uniflora most probably

originated as a tree in the southern part of its distri-

bution in dense ombrophilous forest, steppe grass-

land, pioneer formation in secondary forest or

riparian forests. Genetic diversity results obtained

for the northern and southern groups observed in

the present study support the notion of a probable

southern origin. The appearance of northern group

and its morphology probably is a result of adaptation

to salt and coastal environments.

A substructure with high genetic differentiation

among populations (Haplotype network, AMOVA

results) was found in the southern distribution of

E. uniflora. This substructure may be a consequence

of historical fragmentation in this region, generating

organismal responses dependent on life history traits

and ecological tolerance. Similar results were also

observed for species of Petunia Juss. (Lorenz-Lemke

et al., 2006, 2010; Turchetto et al., 2014), Calibra-

choa heterophylla (M

€ader et al., 2013), Schizolobium

parahyba (Turchetto-Zolet et al., 2012) and Vriesea

gigantea Gaudich. (Palma-Silva et al., 2009) using

the plastid molecular markers.

D

EMOGRAPHIC HISTORY AND ECOLOGICAL NICHE



MODELLING

Populations from northern regions experienced mod-

erate changes in their effective population sizes,

exhibiting signatures of recent demographic expan-

sion and a lower genetic structure; whereas popula-

tions from southern regions experienced smaller or

no changes in effective sizes, thus presenting demo-

graphic stability, high diversity and genetic structur-

ing. The regional differences in the AFD, with

moderate demographic fluctuations in the northern

and stability in the southern regions, suggest that

species-specific traits may be causing differential tol-

erance to past climatic changes. Different demo-

graphic histories across regions were previously

demonstrated for other species in the AFD (d’Horta

et al., 2011; Turchetto-Zolet et al., 2012). This latitu-

dinal diversity gradient may reflect the distinct influ-

ence of Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles in

geographical space (Hewitt, 2000, 2004). A recent

study of the Rhinella crucifer species complex (a

group of endemic toads with a widespread distribu-

tion in the Brazilian Atlantic forest; Thom

e et al.,

2014) revealed regional differences for this species,

with moderate population growth in the north and

central regions and stability in the southern AFD.

The ENM used in the present study predicted frag-

mentation in the southern regions of E. uniflora dis-

tribution (Fig. 4), suggesting an effect of historical

fragmentation in southern populations with lineage

persistence. This fragmentation appears to affect the

geographical distribution of E. uniflora, causing pop-

ulation

differentiation



and

lineage


divergence

(Fig. 2B). Many populations in the southern region

(see Fig. 1B) possess unique haplotypes, which may

suggest that the population of E. uniflora persisted

in multiple localities during glacial cycles where the

ecological conditions were appropriate. During the

Quaternary, glacial cycles resulted in cold, dry condi-

tions interrupted by warmer, wet periods, which con-

sequently led to the expansion and retraction of

northern tropical forests. Previous studies have

demonstrated that in the dry and cold climate of gla-

cial periods, species of the grasslands formation in

southern South America could advance 700 km

northward and that during this period rainforest

persisted in sites near rivers and valleys (Behling &

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

14

A. C. TURCHETTO-ZOLET ET AL.



Lichte, 1997; Behling & Pillar, 2007). The location,

size and existence of forest refugia during the glacial

maximum were dependent on the ecological and

environmental tolerances of each species (Moritz

et al., 2000). Eugenia uniflora appears to have been

able to maintain stable populations throughout the

late Pleistocene in its southern distribution, even

during peaks of glaciations when forests became

fragmented and the climate was temperate (Behling,

2002). In contrast, populations from the northern

AFD appear to have been demographically affected

by late Pleistocene glaciations. The current southern

distribution limit of E. uniflora reaches temperate

regions with discontinuous forest, namely the ripar-

ian forest from humid Chaco and portions over the

pampas grasslands (steppes grassland) in eastern

Argentina and Uruguay. The persistence of temper-

ate southern populations during glacial periods has

also been reported for some other plant species (Azpi-

licueta, Marchelli & Gallo, 2009; Jakob, Martinez-

Meyer & Blattner, 2009; Tremetsberger et al., 2009;

Cosacov et al., 2010; Mathiasen & Premoli, 2010;

Premoli,

Mathiasen

&

Kitzberger,



2010;

Vidal-


Russell, Souto & Premoli, 2011).

Taken together, the results of this study indicate

an important effect of Pleistocene climatic change on

the demographic history of E. uniflora, strongly sup-

porting a scenario of two distinct evolutionary and

demographic patterns for this species from its south-

ern to northern distribution in the AFD. Two distinct

clades of lineages were observed in these regions and

low seed dispersion was detected between popula-

tions from southern to northern regions. The sce-

nario depicted by the analytical approach in the

present study suggests that northern E. uniflora

populations were isolated in one refugium, subse-

quently followed by a population expansion. In con-

trast, the southern populations were fragmented in

multiple refugia. Private alleles found across most of

the populations in the southern suggest the long-

term persistence of these populations, rather than

recent migrations. The results of this study highlight

the contribution of species growing in different phy-

togeographic regions in the AFD, helping in under-

standing of past vegetation and climate dynamics in

this Neotropical region. Understanding the distribu-

tion of the phylogenetically distinct lineages of

E. uniflora highlights the importance of including

spatially refined measures of phylogenetic diversity

coupled with a genomic approach. The results of this

study also provide insight into the conservation

efforts for this species, since predictions have sug-

gested a possible reduction in the presence of suit-

able areas for E. uniflora in the future, particularly

at the south-central portions of the AFD, principally

in Argentina and Paraguay, where we identified a

rare lineage. Understanding the processes that

generate and maintain genetic diversity within

species over time may have strong implications for

the conservation management of the AFD, such as

the protection of centres of genetic diversity and rare

lineages. This species has been the subject of breed-

ing and commercial exploitation and the results

presented here may help in guiding sustainable com-

mercial harvest and preserving the genetic diversity

and rare lineages in this species. Eugenia uniflora

occurs in some geographical areas that harbour great

genetic diversity and includes unique lineages that

should be protected.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This work was supported by FAPERGS (Fundac

ß~ao

de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado do Rio Grande do



Sul, Grant number: 10/0447-0) and CAPES (Coor-

denac


ß~ao de Aperfeicßoamento de Pessoal de Nıvel

Superior,

Grant

number:


88881.064988/2014-01).

N.M.V received a master’s fellowship from CAPES.

RM received a research fellowship number 309030/

2015-3 from CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Desen-

volvimento Cient

ıfico e Tecnologico). We thank the

contribution of the reviewers.

REFERENCES

Almeida DJ, Faria MV, Da Silva PR. 2012. Biologia exper-

imental em pitangueira: uma revis

~ao de cinco decadas de

publicac


ß~oes cientıficas/Experimental biology in pitangueira:

a review of five decades of scientific publications. Revista

Ambi

^encia 8: 159–175.



Alvarado-Serrano DF, Knowles LL. 2014. Ecological niche

models in phylogeographic studies: applications, advances

and precautions. Molecular Ecology Resources 14: 233

–248.


Avise JC. 2009. Phylogeography: retrospect and prospect.

Journal of Biogeography 36: 3

–15.

Azpilicueta MM, Marchelli P, Gallo LA. 2009. The effects



of

Quaternary

glaciations

in

Patagonia as



evidenced

by chloroplast DNA phylogeography of southern beech

Nothofagus obliqua. Tree Genetics and Genomes 5: 561

–571.


Bandelt HJ, Forster P, R

€ohl A. 1999. Median-joining net-

works for inferring intraspecific phylogenies. Molecular

Biology and Evolution 16: 37

–48.

Barros MJF, Morim MP. 2014. Senegalia (Leguminosae,



Mimosoideae) from the Atlantic Domain, Brazil. Systematic

Botany 39: 452

–477.

Batalha-Filho H, Pessoa RO, Fabre PH, Fjelds





a J,


Irestedt M, Ericson PGP, Silveira LF, Miyaki CY.

2014. Phylogeny and historical biogeography of gnateaters

(Passeriformes, Conopophagidae) in the South America

forests.


Molecular

Phylogenetics

and

Evolution



79:

422


–432.

© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF EUGENIA UNIFLORA

15


Behling H. 1997. Late Quaternary vegetation, climate and

fire history of the Araucaria forest and campos region from

Serra Campos Gerais, Parana State (South Brazil). Review

of Palaeobotany and Palynology 97: 109

–121.

Behling H. 1998. Late Quaternary vegetational and climatic



changes in Brazil. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology

99: 143


–156.

Behling H. 2002. South and southeast Brazilian grasslands

during late quaternary times: a synthesis. Palaeogeography,

Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 177: 19

–27.

Behling H, Lichte M. 1997. Evidence of dry and cold cli-



matic conditions at glacial times in tropical southeastern

Brazil. Quaternary Research 48: 348

–358.

Behling H, Negrelle RRB. 2001. Tropical rain forest and



climate dynamics of the Atlantic lowland, southern Brazil,

during the Late Quaternary. Quaternary Research 56: 383

389.


Behling H, Pillar VD. 2007. Late Quaternary vegetation,

biodiversity and fire dynamics on the Southern Brazilian

highland and their implication for conservation and man-

agement of modern Araucaria forest and grassland ecosys-

tems. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B:

Biological Sciences 362: 243

–251.

Braconnot P, Otto-Bliesner B, Harrison S, Joussaume



S, Peterchmitt JY, Abe-Ouchi A, Crucifix M, Fichefet

T, Hewitt CD, Kageyama M, Kitoh A, Loutre M-F,

Marti O, Merkel U, Ramstein G, Valdes P, Weber L,

Yu Y, Zhao Y. 2006. Coupled simulations of the mid-Holo-

cene and Last Glacial Maximum: new results from PMIP2.

Climate of the Past Discussions 2: 1293

–1346.

Carnaval AC, Hickerson MJ, Haddad CFB, Rodrigues



MT, Moritz C. 2009. Stability predicts genetic diversity in

the Brazilian Atlantic forest hotspot. Science 323: 785

–789.

Carnaval AC, Moritz C. 2008. Historical climate modelling



predicts patterns of current biodiversity in the Brazilian

Atlantic forest. Journal of Biogeography 35: 1187

–1201.

Carnaval AC, Waltari E, Rodrigues MT, Rosauer D,



Vanderwal J, Damasceno R, Prates I, Strangas M,

Spanos Z, Rivera D, Pie MR, Firkowski CR, Born-

schein MR, Ribeiro LF, Moritz C. 2014. Prediction of

phylogeographic endemism in an environmentally complex

biome. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological

Sciences 281: 20141461.

Carstens BC, Knowles LL. 2007. Estimating species phy-

logeny from gene-tree probabilities despite incomplete lin-

eage sorting: an example from Melanoplus grasshoppers.

Systematic Biology 56: 1

–12.

Chan LM, Brown JL, Yoder AD. 2011. Integrating statisti-



cal genetic and geospatial methods brings new power to

phylogeography. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 59:

523

–537.


Cheng L, Connor TR, Sir

en J, Aanensen DM, Corander

J. 2013. Hierarchical and spatially explicit clustering of

DNA sequences with BAPS software. Molecular Biology

and Evolution 30: 1224

–1228.


Collevatti RG, Terribile LC, de Oliveira G, Lima-

Ribeiro MS, Nabout JC, Rangel TF, Diniz-Filho JAF.

2013. Drawbacks to palaeodistribution modelling: the case

of South American seasonally dry forests. Journal of Bio-

geography 40: 345

–358.


Collevatti RG, Terribile LC, Lima-Ribeiro MS, Nabout

JC, de Oliveira G, Rangel TF, Rabelo SG, Diniz-Filho

JAF. 2012. A coupled phylogeographical and species distri-

bution modelling approach recovers the demographical his-

tory of a Neotropical seasonally dry forest tree species.

Molecular Ecology 21: 5845

–5863.

Collins WD, Bitz CM, Blackmon ML, Bonan GB,



Bretherton CS, Carton JA, Chang P, Doney SC, Hack

JJ, Henderson TB, Kiehl JT, Large WG, Mckenna DS,

Santer BD, Smith RD. 2006. The Community Climate

System Model version 3 (CCSM3). Journal of Climate 19:

2122

–2143.


Corander J, Sir

en J, Arjas E. 2008. Bayesian spatial mod-

eling of genetic population structure. Computational Statis-

tics 23: 111

–129.

Cosacov A, S



ersic AN, Sosa V, Johnson LA, Cocucci AA.

2010. Multiple periglacial refugia in the Patagonian steppe

and post-glacial colonization of the Andes: the phylogeogra-

phy of Calceolaria polyrhiza. Journal of Biogeography 37:

1463

–1477.


Cruz F, Turchetto-Zolet AC, Veto N, Mondin CA,

Sobral M, Almer

~ao M, Margis R. 2013. Phylogenetic

analysis of the genus Hexachlamys (Myrtaceae) based on

plastid and nuclear DNA sequences and their taxonomic

implications. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society

172: 532

–543.


Da Silva LC, Oliva MA, Azevedo AA, Ara

ujo JM, Aguiar

RM. 2005. Micromorphological and anatomical alterations

caused by simulated acid rain in Restinga plants: Eugenia

uniflora and Clusia hilariana. Water, Air, and Soil Pollu-

tion 168: 129

–143.

De Oliveira Jucoski G, Cambraia J, Ribeiro C, de



Oliveira JA, de Paula SO, Oliva MA. 2013. Impact of

iron toxicity on oxidative metabolism in young Eugenia

uniflora

L.

plants.



Acta

Physiologiae

Plantarum

35:


1645

–1657.


Diniz-filho JAF, Soares TN, Pires M, Telles DEC. 2014.

Pattern-oriented modelling of population genetic structure.

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 113: 1152

–1161.


Doyle JJ, Doyle JL. 1990. Isolation of plant DNA from

fresh tissue. Focus 12: 3.

Drummond AJ, Rambaut A, Shapiro B, Pybus OG.

2005. Bayesian coalescent inference of past population

dynamics from molecular sequences. Molecular Biology and

Evolution 22: 1185

–1192.

Drummond AJ, Suchard MA, Xie D, Rambaut A. 2012.



Bayesian phylogenetics with BEAUti and the BEAST 1.7.

Molecular Biology And Evolution 29: 1969

–1973.

Duminil J, Heuertz M, Doucet JL, Bourland N, Cruaud



C, Gavory F, Doumenge C, Navascu

es M, Hardy OJ.

2010. CpDNA-based species identification and phylogeogra-

phy: application to African tropical tree species. Molecular

Ecology 19: 5469

–5483.


Edgar RC. 2004. MUSCLE: Multiple sequence alignment

with high accuracy and high throughput. Nucleic Acids

Research 32: 1792

–1797.


© 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016

16

A. C. TURCHETTO-ZOLET ET AL.



Excoffier L, Lischer HEL. 2010. Arlequin suite ver 3.5: a

new series of programs to perform population genetics anal-

yses

under


Linux

and


Windows.

Molecular

Ecology

Resources 10: 564



–567.

Excoffier L, Smouse PE, Quattro JM. 1992. Analysis of

molecular variance inferred from metric distances among

DNA haplotypes: application to human mitochondrial DNA

restriction data. Genetics 131: 479

–491.


Fay J, Wu CI. 2000. Hitchhiking under positive Darwinian

selection. Genetics 155: 1405

–1413.

Ferreira-Ramos R, Accoroni KAG, Rossi A, Guidugli



MC, Mestriner MA, Martinez CA, Alzate-Marin AL.

2014. Genetic diversity assessment for Eugenia uniflora L.,

E. pyriformis Cambess., E. brasiliensis Lam. and E. fran-

cavilleana O. Berg Neotropical tree species (Myrtaceae)

with heterologous SSR markers. Genetic Resources and

Crop Evolution 61: 267

–272.

Ferreira-Ramos R, Laborda PR, de Oliveira Santos M,



Mayor MS, Mestriner MA, de Souza AP, Alzate-Marin

AL. 2007. Genetic analysis of forest species Eugenia uni-

flora L. through newly developed SSR markers. Conserva-

tion Genetics 9: 1281

–1285.

Govaerts R, Dransfield J, Zona SF, Hodel DR, Hender-



son A. 2011. World checklist of Myrtaceae. Facilitated by

the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Available at: http://apps.-

kew.org/wcsp/ (accessed 22 January 2011).

Gressler E, Pizo MA, Morelatto LP. 2006. Polinizac

ß~ao e

dispers


~ao de sementes em Myrtaceae do Brasil. Revista

Brasileira de Bot

^anica 29: 509–530.

Guzman F, Kulcheski FR, Turchetto-Zolet AC, Margis

R. 2014. De novo assembly of Eugenia uniflora L. transcrip-

tome and identification of genes from the terpenoid biosyn-

thesis pathway. Plant Science: an International Journal of

Experimental Plant Biology 229: 238

–246.

Hammer O, Harper DAT, Ryan PD. 2001. PAST: Paleon-



tological StatisticsSoftware Package for Education and Data

Analysis, Version 2.16, Available at:http://folk.uio.no/oham-

mer/past/.

Hewitt G. 2000. The genetic legacy of the Quaternary ice

ages. Nature 405: 907

–913.


Hewitt GM. 2004. Genetic consequences of climatic oscilla-

tions in the Quaternary. Philosophical Transactions of the

Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences 359:

183


–195; discussion 195.

d’Horta FM, Cabanne GS, Meyer D, Miyaki CY. 2011.

The genetic effects of Late Quaternary climatic changes

over a tropical latitudinal gradient: diversification of an

Atlantic Forest passerine. Molecular Ecology 20:1923

–1935.


Jakob SS, Martinez-Meyer E, Blattner FR. 2009. Phylo-

geographic analyses and paleodistribution modeling indi-

cate Pleistocene in situ survival of Hordeum species

(Poaceae) in southern Patagonia without genetic or spatial

restriction. Molecular Biology and Evolution 26: 907

–923.


Joly C, Aidar M, Klink CA, McGrath DG, Moreira AG,

Moutinho P, Nepstad DC, Oliveira AA, Pott A, Rodal

MJN, Sampaio EVSB. 1999. Evolution of the Brazilian

phytogeography classification systems: implications for bio-

diversity conservation Ci

^encia e. Cultura 51: 331–348.

Knowles LL. 2009. Statistical phylogeography. Annual

Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics 40: 593

–612.

Knowles LL, Maddison WP. 2002. Statistical phylogeogra-



phy. Molecular Ecology 11: 2623

–2635.


Kress WJ, Erickson DL. 2007. A two-locus global DNA bar-

code for land plants: the coding rbcL gene complements the

non-coding trnH-psbA spacer region. PLoS ONE 2: e508.

Kress WJ, Wurdack KJ, Zimmer EA, Weigt LA, Janzen

DH. 2005. Use of DNA barcodes to identify flowering

plants. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of

the United States of America 102: 8369

–8374.


Kuhner MK. 2006. LAMARC 2.0: maximum likelihood and

Bayesian estimation of population parameters. Bioinformat-

ics 22: 768

–770.


Ledru M. 1998. Vegetation dynamics in southern and cen-

tral Brazil during the last 10,000 yr B.P. Review of

Palaeobotany and Palynology 99: 131

–142.


Librado P, Rozas J. 2009. DnaSP v5: a software for com-

prehensive analysis of DNA polymorphism data. Bioinfor-

matics 25: 1451

–1452.


Lichte M,

Behling


H.

1999.


Dry

and


cold

climatic


conditions in the formation of the present landscape in

southeastern Brazil. Zeitschrift f

€ur Geomorphologie 43:

341


–358.

Liu J, M


€oller M, Provan J, Gao LM, Poudel RC, Li DZ.

2013. Geological and ecological factors drive cryptic specia-

tion of yews in a biodiversity hotspot. New Phytologist 199:

1093


–1108.

Lorenz-Lemke AP, M

€ader G, Muschner VC, Stehmann

JR, Bonatto SL, Salzano FM, Freitas LB. 2006. Diver-

sity and natural hybridization in a highly endemic species

of Petunia (Solanaceae): a molecular and ecological analy-

sis. Molecular Ecology 15: 4487



Yüklə 0,66 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə