Anosmia Following Traumatic Brain Injury Patient Information Booklet



Yüklə 50,02 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix07.03.2017
ölçüsü50,02 Kb.

 

Anosmia Following Traumatic Brain Injury 

 

Patient Information Booklet 



 

Talis Consulting Limited 



 

What is Anosmia? 

 

Anosmia literally means “no smell” and refers to 



any  condition  whereby  a  person  loses  their 

sense  of  smell.  This  can  be  for  a  variety  of 

reasons,  including  infection,  the  actions  of 

noxious  chemicals,  and  genetics  however  it  is 

also possible following a head injury. 

 

There  are  two  main  forms  of  anosmia;  a  general 



anosmia  where  a  person  can  no  longer  perceive 

any smells, and specific anosmia, where one or a 

few  smells  in  particular  can  no  longer  be 

perceived.  Following  a  head  injury  general 

anosmia  is  far  more  common,  as  specific 

anosmia  tends  to  arise  from  genetic  causes,  or 

trauma directly to the receptors in the nose. 

 

Why can a Head Injury Cause Anosmia? 



 

Nerves  from  smell  receptors  in  the  nose 

travel to the frontal lobes of the brain (the bit 

behind 


your 

forehead) 

and 

are 


then 

processed  in  olfactory  centres  in  the 

orbitofrontal cortex (the lower portion of the 

frontal  lobes)  and  certain  areas  in  the 

temporal  cortex  (the  areas  on  the  side  of 

your brain). 

 

The  nerve  which  carries  information  from 



your nose to the olfactory centres must pass 

between the frontal lobes and the bony protrusions from the base of the skull. 

This  unfortunately  makes  the  nerve  vulnerable  to  damage  from  a  blow  to  the 

head. 


 

Anosmia  can  also  occur  from  direct  damage  to  the  olfactory  centres  in  the 

orbitofrontal  cortex,  as  this  area  of  the  brain  may  grind  against  the  rough 

surface of the front of your skull. 

 

Another reason is that following a head injury bleeding in the front of the  head 



may  place  pressure  on  the  nerves  travelling  from  the  nose  and  the  olfactory 

centres in the brain, meaning they cannot work properly. This form of anosmia 

is usually temporary as when the bleeding subsides pressure upon the nerves 

and brain is released. 

 

Anosmia  can  occur  from  injury  to  any  part  of  the  head,  however  it  is  most 



common  following  a  blow  to  the  back  of  the  head.  This  is  because  it  causes 

the front of the brain to grind against the rough front portion of the skull.  

Anosmia  is  more  common  following more  severe  head  injuries.  However  this 

is  not  a  completely  clear-cut  relationship.  Anosmia  can  occur  following  very 

slight head injuries in which the injured person may not have experienced any 

loss of consciousness. 



 

 

Why is Anosmia Important? 



 

Unfortunately  anosmia  has  received 

less research attention than many other 

problems  which  arise  following  a  head 

injury, this is largely due to the fact that 

anosmia may not seem to have any real 

impact on day-to-day functioning or for 

treatment  success.  However  the 

importance  of  anosmia  should  not  be 

overlooked.  

 

Anosmia  is  important  because  it  is 



generally  associated  with  an  injury  to 

the front of the brain. This means that it 

may  provide  a  clue  as  to  where  in  the 

brain damage has occurred.  

 

This  also  means  that  anosmia  usually 



coincides  with  other  problems  which 

can arise following damage to the front 

of  the  brain.  For  example  problems  with  planning,  problem  solving, 

attention  or  inhibition  of  behaviours.  Therefore  anosmia  can  sometimes 

help guide clinicians towards what other problems to investigate. 

 

However  it  is  important  to  get  your  anosmia  tested.  Only  a  minority  of 



those who have anosmia actually realise they have a problem. It may also 

be important that your anosmia is diagnosed properly, as if it has arisen for 

reasons  other  than  your  head  injury  then  the  correct  course  of  action  to 

deal with it may be different.  

 

Finally, anosmia is important because it impacts upon your sense of taste. 



Most  of  the  ‘taste’  of  food  and  drink 

actually  comes  from  smell  receptors  in 

the  nose,  as  the  smell  of  the  food  or 

drink  in  your  mouth  travels  through  the 

back  of  your  throat  to  the  nose.  This 

means that our ability to taste and enjoy 

food relies upon our sense of smell. 

 


 

 

 



What are the Some of the Problems Anosmia Can Cause? 

 

Weight Loss or Gain, and a Change in Appetite 



 

Because  anosmia  reduces  our  ability  to 

taste foods, this can reduce enjoyment in 

eating. This can lead to a lack of appetite 

and  weight  loss.  However  some  people 

find they put on weight as they eat foods 

higher  in  salt,  sugar  and  fat  to  try  and 

gain  some  more  pleasure  out  of  their 

diet.  

 

It  is  important  that  you  recognise  that  this  may  be  a  problem  as  any 



involuntary  change  in  weight  can  have  consequences  for  your  general 

health.  

 

Sexual Problems 



 

In a minority of cases, people have reported that they do not gain the same 

enjoyment  out  of  sex  following  the  onset  of  anosmia.  This  may  not  be  as 

surprising  as  it  sounds,  as  numerous  theories  point  to  the  importance  of 

pheromones and scent in physical attraction.  

 

However  sexual  problems  can  occur  for  a  variety  of  reasons  following  a 



brain  injury,  and  are  often  emotional  or  psychological  in  nature,  so  it  is 

important that you recognise the true cause of any sexual problems so they 

can be dealt with appropriately. 

 

Depression 



 

The  majority  of  people  do  not  even  realise  they  suffer  from  anosmia,  and 

for those that do, most can adapt relatively well. However for a few people 

the loss of their sense of smell can have a huge impact on them and cause  

symptoms  of  depression.  This  may  be  especially  true  as  coping  with 

difficulties can be harder when you are recovering from a head injury. 

 

It is important to recognise if you are experiencing any depression, whether 



it  is  caused  by  your  anosmia  or  not.  Make  sure  you  seek  help  for 

depression from your GP.  



 

 

What Treatments are Available for Anosmia? 



 

Anosmia  from  a  brain  injury  is  not  usually 

considered treatable.  The ability of anosmia 

to  improve  may  depend  upon  the  nature  of 

the brain injury: 

 

If  the  nerves  and  brain  areas  are  under 



compression  from  bleeding,  or  are  bruised, 

then  sensations  may  gradually  recover  as 

swelling  and  bleeding  subsides.  This  is 

usually  the  mechanism  in  those  cases  of 

anosmia which recover before three months. 

 

However  even  if  the  nerves  and  brain  cells 



suffer  direct  damage,  your  sense  of  smell 

may  recover.  The  nerves  and  brain  cells 

responsible  for  smell  do  show  some  capacity  for  regeneration  following 

damage;  however  these  self-repair  mechanisms  may  take  time.  It  is  not 

uncommon  for  recovery  to  still  be  ongoing  a  year  following  your  injury. 

However  it  is  rare  to  recover  one’s  sense  of  smell  if  it  has  not  started  to 

return after one year’s time. 

 

There are some rare reports that during the recovery process people suffer 



parosmia or phantom odours. Parosmia is where the brain may misidentify 

smells,  so  that  the  smells  of  well-known  things  can  seem  odd  or  wrong. 

Phantom  odours  are  where  you  perceive  smells  which  are  not  actually 

there, they might be thought of as smell-illusions.  

However  these  instances  are  very 

rare,  and  their  cause  is  not  yet 

fully  understood.  It  is  likely  they 

are  due  to  the  activity  of  a 

partiall y-rec overe d 

olfactory 

system,  although  why  this  should 

happen  is  not  clear.  However  in 

those  rare  cases  they  have  been 

reported 

they 

seem 


to 

be 


temporary  problems,  and  resolve 

with the recovery process. 

 

There may be several different self-repair processes in the brain which can 



help to repair damaged systems responsible for smell. What processes are 

used  can  depend  on  the  location  of  the  damage,  the  type  of  damage,  and 

the severity of the damage.  

This makes it very difficult to predict who will recover their sense of smell, 

and when they might recover it.  


 

 

What Can be Done to Help? 



 

The  following  section  describes  a  number  of  practical  changes  you  may 

want  to  implement  to  help  you  deal  with  any  problems  arising  from 

anosmia. You may want to try some or all of the following tips, depending 

on you individual needs and problems. 

 

Make eating fun again 



 

If  you  find  problems  with  your  appetite  and 

weight  loss  or  gain,  then  you  might  want  to 

consider different ways to make eating fun once 

more.  The  texture  of  foods  becomes  very 

important,  particularly  how  you  combine  them. 

You may want to mix cooked and raw vegetables 

for a texture comparison, or eat a hot meal with a 

cold salad for different temperature experiences. 

 

Also remember that the sense of taste is actually 



often  preserved,  however  is  dulled.  Therefore 

strong  tasting  foods  (such  as  spicy  Indian  foods)  can  still  cause 

sensations upon the tongue, giving more of an impact to the foods you eat. 

 

Install smoke detectors 



 

Anosmia  can  have  important  implications  for  your 

safety. With an impaired sense of smell you may not 

be able to notice the smell of smoke or burning quite 

so  readily.  Therefore  you  should  install  smoke 

detectors  in  every  room  to  reduce  the  risk  of  a  fire 

going unnoticed.  

 

You  might  also  want  to  consider  switching  from  a 



gas fire to an electric one, as you may not always be 

aware if you accidentally leave the gas on. Whether it 

is a gas fire or cooker or other appliance.  

 

Check labelling on chemical substances 



 

Some substances such as glue or aerosols may require ventilation in order 

to  be  safely  used.  When  someone  has  anosmia  they  may  be  less  aware 

when  a  chemical  they  are  using  is  noxious  and  harmful.  Therefore  check 

the  labels  of  anything  using  chemicals  in  order  to  make  sure  you’re  not 

breathing in harmful substances. 

 

Check use-by dates on food 



 

Without a sense of smell it can be very hard to tell when food has gone off. 

Pay attention to any use-by labels and if in doubt get a friend or relative to 

check whether  the  food  is  past  its  best.  Because  your  sense  of  taste may 

also be impaired it can be very difficult to know whether something you are 


Useful Websites: 

 

www.headway.org.uk  



-  A  useful  web  site  with  much 

information  about  brain  injury  and 

rehabilitation in the UK. 

 

www.birt.co.uk  



-  Another  useful  web  site  concerning 

brain  injury,  with  downloadable 

leaflets  about  brain  injury  and  its 

implications. 

 

h t t p : / / b r a i n i n j u r y t . o r g . a u / p o r t a l /



sensory/motor/anosmia-losing-your-

sense-of-smel---fact-sheet.html 

-  A  fact  sheet  devoted  specifically  to  the  problems  of  anosmia 

following a brain injury. 

 

h t t p : / / w w w . c a r d i f f . a c . u k / b i o s i / s t a f f i n f o / j a c o b / An o s m i a /



anosmia.html 

-  A  page  of  information  about  anosmia  generally,  and  current 

stances on the research on treatments for anosmia. 

Talis Consulting Ltd. – 2009 



Yüklə 50,02 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə