Anosmia in association with occupational use



Yüklə 62,05 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix07.03.2017
ölçüsü62,05 Kb.

CASE REPORT

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Anosmia in association with occupational use

of a waterproof coating chemical

Timo Hannu, Elina Toskala, Timo Tuomi and Markku Sainio

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Abstract

A case of acute permanent anosmia is described in a renovation worker during exposure to a

waterproof coating chemical. The chemical consisted of several substances of which four (acetone,

acrylates, butyl acetate and carbon disulfide) has been previously reported to induce hyposmia or

anosmia in workers. Other aetiologies were clinically excluded but a large arachnoidea cyst in the

frontal part of the left temporobasal fossa with possible compression of the left entorhinal cortex. The

toxic aetiology of anosmia is supported by the acute onset and the temporal relationship with

occupational exposure. The silent cyst as the cause of anosmia is improbable, but it may have had some

contributory role. Our case illustrates both the challenges when clinically examining patients with

work-related olfactory impairment and the importance of multi-disciplinary approach to such patients.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Key words

Acrylates; anosmia; carbon disulphide; occupational exposure; olfactory function; volatile organic

compounds.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction

Common causes of disturbances of the olfactory function

include nasal or sinus disease, upper respiratory infec-

tions and head traumas

[1]


. In addition, brain tumours,

drugs, or occupational exposure can lead to anosmia (loss

of the sense of smell) or to hyposmia (a diminished sense

of smell)

[2]

. Several chemicals, including metals,



organic compounds and solvent mixtures can impair

olfactory function in humans

[3,4]

.

We present a case of acute onset of anosmia in a worker



during exposure to a waterproof coating chemical. Other

aetiologies were excluded but a large arachnoidea cyst

with possible compression of the entorhinal cortex. The

toxic aetiology of anosmia is evaluated against the facts on

onset and the temporal relationship with occupational

exposure and its chemical analysis. The role of other

aetiologies of the anosmia is also discussed.

Case report

Exposure

The patient was a 31-year-old man who had worked as a

renovation worker since 1998 for the same employer. His

duties included renovation and repair works of real

estates and flats including bathrooms and washrooms.

The materials used at work included unplanned con-

struction boards, paints, patching materials (fillers or

plasters) and waterproof coatings.

On September 1999, when the patient renovated

bathrooms, he used a waterproof coating chemical. The

chemical was a two-component system consisting of a

solvent-free, acrylic-based liquid combined with a

cement-based powder. Before the use, the two com-

ponents are mixed together. The mixing was done

outdoors using respiratory mask and protective gloves.

The chemical was applied to the floor and wall areas with

a paint roller. The duration of the work session was 5

weeks and during this period the patient used the

waterproofing chemical once a week, approximately 2 h

per work shift. The application of the chemical took 1 –

2 h after which it was allowed to dry up till the next

morning. In the rest of the time, the patient installed tiles

to the bathrooms. In the bathrooms, neither local exhaust

ventilation nor personal respiratory protective device was

in use. According to the patient, the temperature was

high and the odour of the chemical was very strong under

these conditions.

Symptoms and primary investigations

On September 1999, at 4 weeks from the beginning of the

work session, which lasted 5 weeks, the patient experi-

enced loss of the sense of smell. He also felt irritation of

eyes and mucous membranes and these are the symptoms

Occupational Medicine 2005;55:142–144

doi:10.1093/occmed/kqi043

Occupational Medicine, Vol. 55 No. 2

q Society of Occupational Medicine 2005; all rights reserved

142

Correspondence to: Timo Hannu, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health—



Department of Occupational Medicine, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-02500

Helsinki, Finland. Tel: +358 03 4742575; fax: +358 03 4742149; e-mail: Timo.

Hannu@ttl.fi

Finnish Institute of Occupational Health—Department of Occupational

Medicine, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-02500, Helsinki, Finland.


that were shared by the other employees. There were no

symptoms of respiratory infection. Before this work

session, the patient had used the waterproofing chemical

for a couple of times experiencing the eye irritation.

Since then the patient had not used this chemical. Only

after 2 months, he contacted a local health centre, from

which he was sent to a local central hospital for an ENT

consultation. The ENT examination was normal. A CT

scan with gadolinium enhancement was done in November

2000. Apart from normal sinuses, a large arachnoidea cyst

was seen in the frontal part of the left temporobasal fossa. In

an MRI (1T) with gadolinium enhancement, the

5 £ 5 £ 6 cm cyst, containing cerebrospinal fluid, was

non-enhancing and no oedema was present, but it

compressed and slightly dislocated the left temporal lobe.

The median cerebral artery and its branches were pushed

slightly upwards and followed the cranial edge of the cyst.

The left lateral ventricle was narrower than the right, the

pons was asymmetric and the median line had minutely

moved to the right. On the neurological consultation, the

anamnesis did not reveal any head trauma or preceding

infection and the neurological status was normal. Thus, the

cyst was regarded as a coincidental finding without

association to the loss of smell. The patient also had almost

weekly headache for 2 – 3 years. The ache began usually

after a long workday and was felt in the whole cranium area.

It was not very intense, not provoked by physical exertion

and did not cause discontinuation of work and was relieved

by ibuprofen. The patient was sent to a neurosurgeon’s

consultation where an operation was recommended but the

patient decided not to have it.

Patient had atopia and allergic rhinitis for birch pollen

in his medical history. He had been examined for

dyspnoea in a local central hospital 10 years ago. Then,

the PEF monitoring was suggestive of asthma and, in the

spirometry, obstruction was noted in the small airways.

Skin-prick tests to common allergens showed allergy to

birch, alder, hay, dog and cat. Diagnoses of bronchial

asthma and allergic rhinitis were established. Since then,

he had used antihistamine and nasal corticosteroid spray

in the pollen time and inhaled salbutalmol on demand.

He had smoked regularly in the past 10 years, approxi-

mately 10 cigarettes per day.

Investigations at the Finnish Institute of

Occupational Health (FIOH)

Later, at FIOH in 2002, the patient was still anosmic.

Total serum IgE was 172 kU/l. An ENT examination was

normal and no nasal polyposis was seen. On smell testing,

the patient was unable to smell or identify any of the

following odours: aqua, lactose, coffee and coffee 10%,

black pepper, cinnamon, oregano, ammonia 0.5 and 3%,

white spirit, ethanol, tar, lemon, rose oil and tall oil. On

neurological consultation, based on the previous neuro-

logical examinations with present normal neurological

status, it was concluded that the arachnoidea cyst was not

the cause of the anosmia.

The chemical constitution of the waterproof coating

chemical was analysed at the FIOH. The waterproof

coating consisted of the acrylic polymer dispersion and

the render including cement, sand calcium sulphate and

cellulose. Material samples were incubated in nitrogen in

a gas-washing bottle, and the substances were analysed by

gas chromatography and by mass selective detector

(Table 1)

. The total amount of volatile organic com-

pounds was determined. The render part included the

same compounds as the dispersion but in very small

amounts. Furthermore, in a work simulation test at a

construction site, we measured the air concentration of

organic solvent components and volatile organic com-

pounds when the waterproof coating was applied and

during the drying period of 1.5 h. The results obtained

during the second application round are presented.

During the first application, similar or somewhat lower

air concentrations were found.

At FIOH, on the basis of the medical history and the

performed smell tests, a diagnosis of permanent anosmia

was established. Avoidance of the waterproof coating

chemical was recommended. Since then, the patient has

continued to work in the same workplace without using this

chemical and has been well. On the control visit 1 year later

at FIOH, the patient was still anosmic. On smell testing, the

Table 1.

Summary of emissions of material sample (dispersion)

and air concentrations during work simulation applying the

waterproofing compound

Emission

(mg/m


3

g)

Air concentration



(mg/m

3

)



1-Butanolp

145.2


9.0

Acetonep


47.3

5.5


Vinyl acetate

28.0


n.a.

Carbon disulfide

23.0

1.24


2-Methyl-2-propanol

16.0


n.a.

Butyl ether

10.0

0.74


n-Butyl acetatep

8.0


, 1

Butyl propionate

4.4

n.a.


Bentsaldehyde

1.1


0.05

1.4-Dioxane

1.0

0.25


Butyl butyrate

0.7


0.06

Ethyl benzene

0.6

n.a.


2-Ethylhexylacrylate

0.3


0.08

tert-Butanolp

8.5

Trimethyl amine



0.005

Dimethyl bentsamide

0.007

Acetaldehyde



0.017

Butyl acrylate

0.1

pSampling with active charcoal tubes.



n.a., not analysed.

T. HANNU ET AL.: ANOSMIA IN ASSOCIATION WITH USE OF WATERPROOF COATING CHEMICAL 143



results were unchanged, and on the ENT consultation, the

status was normal.

Discussion

In our patient, among the subjective complaints of the

loss of olfactory function, abnormal objective measures in

smell tests were observed. The patient did not have nasal

polyposis, but he had a history of perennial rhinitis, which

can cause moderate hyposmia but not anosmia

[5]

.

According to the patient, no symptoms of respiratory



infection were present when the occupational exposure

had taken place. Moreover, our patient had no history of

head traumas. The possible olfaction effect of the large

arachnoidea cyst could be by direct compression of the

ventral surface of the telencephalon, which harbours the

olfactory cortex of the left hemisphere. The lesions, e.g.

temporal lobectomy, of these higher olfactory centres are

known to be associated with dysfunction of odour

detection and recognition, but not anosmia

[6]


. Also,

tumours of the left temporal region compared with the

right have been shown to associate only with ipsilateral

deficiency in olfactory tasks

[7]

. Accordingly, in the



literature there are no descriptions of anosmia due to

benign cysts. The toxic aetiology of anosmia is supported

by the acute onset and the temporal relationship with

exposure to the occupational use of a waterproof coating

chemical. The silent cyst as the cause of anosmia is

improbable, but its contributory role cannot be fully

excluded.

The chemicals are used very often as mixtures, or

they emit many different substances. The analysis of

the waterproofing chemical revealed nearly 20 different

substances. The effects of possible interaction of the

emitted substances to the human olfaction are largely

unknown. Of the substances of the patients’ water-

proofing chemical, however, acetone

[3,8]

, acrylates



[1,9,

10]


, butyl acetate

[1]


and carbon disulfide

[1,3]


have

been reported to induce hyposmia or anosmia in workers.

In these studies, the concentrations and durations of

occupational exposure are not always measured. In our

patient, the occupational exposure was measured in a

work simulation test with results pointing out that the

observed exposure levels were below the threshold limit

values. However, the working conditions were necessarily

not the same in the test compared with the real situation,

in which the temperature was high and the patients’

sensation of the odour of the chemical was very strong.

Also, it has been suggested that the olfactory effects of

solvents may occur at levels far below the threshold limit

values


[11]

.

The course and the pathophysiology of the occu-



pation-related olfactory impairment are unsettled. In

workers exposed to organic compounds, a possible

reversibility is reported

[9]


, but permanent deficits have

been noted in exposure to hydrogen sulphide

[12]

and to


methyl acrylate

[10]


. In our patient, the loss of smell was

permanent. Acrylate and methacrylate have caused

olfactory neuron loss and changes in the olfactory

mucosa in animals

[10]

, whereas organic solvents may



act on the olfactory neuron

[11]


.

Our case illustrates the difficulties encountered when

clinically examining patients with work-related olfactory

impairment, and it also demonstrates the importance of

multi-disciplinary approach to such patients. Our finding

is important, due to the widespread use of waterproof

coating chemicals, but epidemiological studies are

needed to verify the observed association. Good venti-

lation of the work areas and the use of protective masks

are recommended when handling such chemicals.

References

1. Duncan HJ, Smith DV. Clinical disorders of olfaction. In:

Doty RL, ed. Handbook of Olfaction and Gustation. New

York: Marcel Dekker, 1995; 345 – 365.

2. Doty RL. A review of olfactory dysfunctions in man. Am J

Otolaryngol 1979;1:57 – 79.

3. Amoore JE. Effects of chemical exposure on olfaction in

humans. In: Barrow CS, ed. Toxicology of the Nasal Passages.

Washington: Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, 1986;

155 – 190.

4. Hastings L, Miller ML. Olfactory loss secondary to toxic

exposure. In: Seiden AM, ed. Taste and Smell Disorders. New

York: Thieme Medical Publishers, 1997; 88 – 106.

5. Apter AJ, April EM, Frank ME, Clive JM. Allergic rhinitis

and olfactory loss. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1995;75:

311 – 316.

6. Eslinger PJ, Damasio AR, Van Hoesen GW. Olfactory

dysfunction in man: anatomical and behavioral aspects.

Brain Cogn 1982;1:259 – 285.

7. Daniels C, Gottwald B, Pause BM, Sojka B, Mehdorn HM,

Ferstl R. Olfactory event-related potentials in patients with

brain tumors. Clin Neurophysiol 2001;112:1523 – 1530.

8. Emmett EA. Parosmia and hyposmia induced by solvent

exposure. Br J Ind Med 1976;33:196 – 198.

9. Schwartz BS, Doty RL, Monroe C, Frye R, Barker S.

Olfactory function in chemical workers exposed to acrylate

and methacrylate vapors. Am J Public Health 1989;79:

613 – 618.

10. Braun D, Wagner W, Zenner HP, Schmahl FW. Disabling

disturbance of olfaction in a dental technician following

exposure to methyl methacrylate. Int Arch Occup Environ

Health 2002;75:S73 – S74.

11. Schwartz BS, Ford DP, Bolla KI, Agnew J, Rothman N,

Bleecker ML. Solvent-associated decrements in olfactory

function in paint manufacturing workers. Am J Ind Med

1990;18:697 – 706.

12. Hirsch AR, Zavala G. Long-term effects on the olfactory

system of exposure to hydrogen sulphide. Occup Environ

Med 1999;56:284 – 287.

144


OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE

Document Outline



Yüklə 62,05 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə