Antifungal activity of the components of Melaleuca alternifolia



Yüklə 113,88 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü113,88 Kb.

Antifungal activity of the components of Melaleuca alternifolia

(tea tree) oil

K.A. Hammer

1

, C.F. Carson



1

and T.V. Riley

1,2

1

Discipline of Microbiology, School of Biomedical and Chemical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia,



and

2

Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Western Australian Centre for Pathology and Medical Research, Queen



Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Nedlands, WA, Australia

2003/159: received 26 February 2003, revised and accepted 13 June 2003

A B S T R A C T

K . A . H A M M E R , C . F . C A R S O N A N D T . V . R I L E Y . 2003.

Aims: To investigate the in vitro antifungal activity of the components of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil.

Methods and Results: Activity was investigated by broth microdilution and macrodilution, and time kill methods.

Components showing the most activity, with minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum fungicidal

concentrations of

£0Æ25%, were terpinen-4-ol, a-terpineol, linalool, a-pinene and b-pinene, followed by 1,8-cineole.

The remaining components showed slightly less activity and had values ranging from 0Æ5 to 2%, with the exception

of b-myrcene which showed no detectable activity. Susceptibility data generated for several of the least water-

soluble components were two or more dilutions lower by macrodilution, compared with microdilution.

Conclusions: All tea tree oil components, except b-myrcene, had antifungal activity. The lack of activity reported

for some components by microdilution may be due to these components becoming absorbed into the polystyrene of

the microtitre tray. This indicates that plastics are unsuitable as assay vessels for tests with these or similar

components.

Significance and Impact of the Study: This study has identified that most components of tea tree oil have

activity against a range of fungi. However, the measurement of antifungal activity may be significantly influenced by

the test method.

Keywords: Candida albicans, 1,8-cineole, monoterpenes, tea tree oil, terpinen-4-ol.

I N T R O D U C T I O N

The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, also known as tea

tree oil, is commonly used in Australia as a topical

therapeutic agent. The medicinal uses of tea tree oil relate

primarily to the anti-inflammatory (Brand et al. 2002; Koh

et al. 2002) and antimicrobial (Carson et al. 2002; Hammer

et al. 2002) properties of the oil. Use as a topical antimi-

crobial agent is supported by a growing body of clinical data

indicating that tea tree oil is effective in the treatment of

infections or conditions such as herpes labialis (Carson et al.

2001), acne (Bassett et al. 1990), tinea (Tong et al. 1992;

Satchell et al. 2002a), onychomycosis (Buck et al. 1994),

dandruff (Satchell et al. 2002b) and oral candidiasis (Vaz-

quez and Zawawi 2002), and in the clearance of methicillin-

resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage (Caelli et al. 2000).

In addition, several recent publications have characterized

the in vitro activity and mechanisms of action of tea tree oil

against bacteria (Cox et al. 2000; Mann et al. 2000; Carson

et al. 2002) and, to a lesser extent, fungi (Hammer et al.

2000, 2002). However, little is known about the in vitro

activity of tea tree oil components against fungi.

The components of tea tree oil, of which there are ca 100,

are mostly monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and their related

alcohols (Brophy et al. 1989). The chemical composition of

tea tree oil is well characterized and the International

Standard ISO 4730 for oil of Melaleuca, terpinen-4-ol type

(tea tree oil) contains a chromatographic profile that

Correspondence to: Katherine A. Hammer, Discipline of Microbiology (M502),

School of Biomedical and Chemical Sciences, The University of Western Australia,

35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia (e-mail: khammer@

cyllene.uwa.edu.au).

ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology

Journal of Applied Microbiology 2003, 95, 853–860

doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x



stipulates minimum and maximum percentage composition

values for 14 components (International Organisation for

Standardisation 1996). The three major components, terp-

inen-4-ol, c-terpinene and a-terpinene, comprise ca 70% of

whole oil while q-cymene, terpinolene, a-terpineol and a-

pinene account for ca 15% of the oil (Brophy et al. 1989).

Given the lack of data relating to the antifungal activity of

the components of tea tree oil, the purpose of this study was

to examine the in vitro susceptibility of some medically

important fungi to tea tree oil components, using several

different investigative tools.

M A T E R I A L S A N D M E T H O D S

Test organisms

A total of 14 fungal isolates were obtained from the

Discipline of Microbiology at The University of Western

Australia and the Division of Microbiology and Infectious

Diseases at The Western Australian Centre for Pathology

and Medical Research. They included reference and

clinical isolates and were Candida albicans ATCC 10231,

C. albicans ATCC 90028, C. parapsilosis ATCC 90018,

Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 10716, Trichosporon sp.,

Rhodotorula rubra, Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum

canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. interdigitale, T. men-

tagrophytes var. mentagrophytes, Aspergillus niger, A. flavus,

A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. Yeast isolates were grown

and maintained on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) stored

at 4

°C, and filamentous fungi were grown and main-



tained on potato dextrose agar slopes stored at room

temperature.

Tea tree oil and components

Tea tree oil (batch 971) was kindly supplied by Australian

Plantations Pty Ltd (Wyrallah, NSW, Australia) and its

composition complied with the International Standard ISO

4730 (International Organisation for Standardisation 1996).

The following tea tree oil components, listed together with

their percentage composition in batch 971, were investigated

for antifungal activity: (+)-terpinen-4-ol (41Æ5%) (Fluka

Chemie AG, Buchs, Switzerland); c-terpinene (21Æ2%)

(Aldrich Chemical Company Inc., Milwaukee, WI, USA);

a-terpinene (10Æ2%) (Sigma Chemical Co., St Louis, MO,

USA); terpinolene (3Æ5%) (Fluka); a-terpineol (2Æ9%)

(Aldrich); a-pinene (2Æ5%) (Aldrich); 1,8-cineole (2Æ1%)

(Sigma); q-cymene (1Æ5%) (Aldrich); (+)-aromadendrene

(1Æ0%) (Fluka); (+)-limonene (0Æ9%) (Sigma); b-myrcene

(Sigma); (+)-b-pinene (Fluka); (±)-linalool (Sigma) and

R-(

))-(a)-phellandrene (Fluka). The concentrations of



b-myrcene, b-pinene, linalool and a-phellandrene in batch

971 of tea tree oil were not determined. All components

were of

‡97% purity, except for terpinolene, b-myrcene and



a-terpinene which were ca 90% pure.

Broth microdilution assay

Yeast inocula were prepared by growing isolates on SDA for

24–48 h at 35

°C and then suspending growth in ca 2 ml of

sterile distilled water (SDW). The density of this suspension

was adjusted to 1 McFarland, and then serially diluted in

SDW to correspond to a final inoculum concentration of

1Æ5–3Æ0

· 10


3

CFU ml


)1

. Inocula for the remaining fungi

were prepared as described previously (Hammer et al.

2002). Final inocula concentrations for all organisms were

confirmed by viable counts.

Broth microdilution assays were performed according to

National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards

(NCCLS) methods (NCCLS 1997, 1998) with minor

modifications. Briefly, doubling dilutions of components,

with final concentrations ranging from 8 to 0Æ002% (v/v)

were prepared in 96-well microtitre trays (Becton Dickinson

Labware, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) in RPMI Medium 1640

(Gibco BRL, Grand Island, NY, USA). Tween 80 (Sigma)

was included at a final concentration of 0Æ001% (v/v) to

enhance the solubility of each component or tea tree oil. The

activity of terpinen-4-ol, terpinolene, 1,8-cineole, c-terpin-

ene, a-terpinene, q-cymene, a-terpineol and b-myrcene

against C. albicans ATCC 10231 was also determined with a

final concentration of 0Æ1% Tween 80 to ascertain whether

an increased concentration of surfactant significantly influ-

enced results. For yeasts, minimum inhibitory concentra-

tions (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations

(MFCs) were determined by subculturing 10 ll from each

well of the microtitre tray, spot inoculating onto SDA and

incubating aerobically at 35

°C. MICs were determined as

the lowest concentration of agent resulting in the mainten-

ance or reduction of the inoculum and MFCs were

determined as the lowest concentration of agent resulting

in no growth. For the remaining fungi, MICs were

determined visually as described by the NCCLS (1998)

and MFCs were determined by subculture as described

previously (Hammer et al. 2002). All isolates were tested on

at least two separate occasions and were re-tested if resultant

MIC or MFC values differed. Modal values were then

selected.

Broth macrodilution assay

The activity of tea tree oil and components against

C. albicans ATCC 10231 was also determined by the broth

macrodilution method. Doubling dilutions of tea tree oil or

component, with final concentrations ranging from 2 to

0Æ016% (v/v) were prepared in RPMI Medium 1640 in

0Æ5 ml volumes in glass McCartney bottles, with a final

854


K . A . H A M M E R ET AL.

ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x



concentration of 0Æ1% (v/v) Tween 80. Initial work with a

final concentration of 0Æ001% (v/v) Tween 80 showed that

results for terpinolene and c-terpinene were not reprodu-

cible whereas results with 0Æ1% Tween 80 were. Inocula

were prepared as described for the microdilution assay and

volumes of 0Æ5 ml were added to each dilution of oil or

component. Dilutions were incubated at 35

°C, either

statically or with shaking. After 24 h incubation, MICs

and MFCs were determined as described above. For a-

terpineol, terpinen-4-ol, a-terpinene and q-cymene, MICs

and MFCs were also determined after 48 h by incubating

dilutions for a further 24 h.

Time kill assay

Inocula for the time kill assays were prepared by inoculating

one to two colonies of C. albicans ATCC 10231 into ca 8 ml

of Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB) and incubating for 18 h

at 35


°C with shaking. Cells were then collected by

centrifugation for 3 min at 1300 g, washed twice in SDW,

and finally resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)

pH 7Æ4 to 6

· 10

6

–1Æ3



· 10

7

CFU ml



)1

. This was halved

upon inoculation, resulting in a starting inoculum concen-

tration of ca 5

· 10

6

CFU ml



)1

. Treatments containing

component or whole oil at one or more final concentrations

ranging from 1 to 0Æ125% (v/v) were prepared in 1 ml

volumes of PBS with a final concentration of 0Æ001%

Tween 80, which was similar to controls. At 1-min

intervals, 1 ml of inocula was added to each treatment

and mixed for 20 s. Treatments were incubated with

shaking at 35

°C and samples were taken at 0Æ5 and

30 min, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 h. Viable counts were

performed by serially diluting each sample 10-fold in SDW

and spreading 100 ll volumes from the appropriate dilu-

tions onto SDA in duplicate. Alternatively, duplicate pour

plates were prepared by aliquoting 1 ml of the appropriate

dilution into the centre of an empty 90 mm plastic Petri

dish and adding ca 19 ml of molten, cooled SDA. Petri

dishes were swirled during and after the addition of agar to

ensure even mixing. After incubation at 35

°C, plates with

30–300 colonies were counted and viable counts deter-

mined. The limit of detection, calculated from 30 colonies

in the 10

)1

dilution, was 3



· 10

3

CFU ml



)1

for spread

plates or 3

· 10


2

CFU ml


)1

for pour plates. Assays were

repeated at least twice and mean and standard error values

were calculated from viable count data.

Statistical analyses

Viable count data from time kill assays were compared

using a Student’s t-test (two-tailed, two-sample assuming

unequal variance). P-values of <0Æ05 were considered

significant.

R E S U L T S

Broth microdilution assay

Data obtained by broth microdilution are shown in

Table 1. In addition, MICs of a-pinene were 0Æ008% for

A. niger and 0Æ016% for A. flavus, A. fumigatus and

Penicillium sp. MFCs of a-pinene were 0Æ03% for Penicil-

lium sp. and 0Æ016% for A. niger, A. flavus and A. fumig-

atus. For the dermatophytes, MICs of a-pinene were

<0Æ004% and further testing of these organisms, and yeasts

other than C. albicans ATCC 10231, was not pursued.

Components with the lowest MICs and MFCs were

terpinen-4-ol and a-terpineol, followed by 1,8-cineole. In

contrast, a-terpinene, c-terpinene and q-cymene showed

little activity. Comparison of the different fungal groups

showed that the dermatophytes were most susceptible to

components, with the lowest MICs and MFCs for each

component often occurring within this group. The group

with the highest MICs was the yeasts and the highest

MFCs, disregarding values of >8, were observed among

the nondermatophyte filamentous fungi. MICs and MFCs

obtained with the increased Tween concentration (0Æ1%)

were either equivalent or one concentration lower for

terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole and tea tree oil, compared with

values obtained with 0Æ001% Tween. For q-cymene,

c-terpinene and b-myrcene all values remained unchanged

at >8% whereas values for a-terpinene were 8% with

increased Tween. For terpinolene, values were consider-

ably lower with 0Æ1% Tween 80, with an MIC of 1Æ0% and

MFC of 2Æ0%, compared with values of >8% obtained

with 0Æ001% Tween.

Broth macrodilution assay

By the macrodilution method, all components except

b-myrcene showed activity at

£2Æ0% (Table 2). Comparison

of values obtained at 24 and 48 h showed that MICs and

MFCs did not change for terpinen-4-ol and a-terpineol

(data not shown).

However,


MICs and MFCs for

a-terpinene and q-cymene were one or more concentrations

higher at 48 h compared with 24 h, for assays conducted

standing and with shaking. Similarly, comparison of results

obtained with standing or shaking did not differ for

terpinen-4-ol, a-terpineol, terpinolene and tea tree oil at

24 h. However, for c-terpinene and a-terpinene, MICs were

1Æ0% when obtained standing, compared with 0Æ5%

obtained with shaking. Susceptibility data obtained by

micro- and macrodilution methods were equivalent or

differed by only one dilution for terpinen-4-ol, a-terpineol,

a-pinene, aromadendrene, a-phellandrene and tea tree oil.

In contrast, values were two or more concentrations lower

by macrodilution for terpinolene, 1,8-cineole, c-terpinene,

a-terpinene, q-cymene, limonene and linalool.

C O M P O N E N T S O F T E A T R E E O I L

855

ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x



Table

1

In



vitro

activity


of

tea


tree

oil


and

components

(%

v/v)


against

fungi,


determined

by

the



broth

microdilution

method

Tea


tree

oil/


component*

Organism


C.

alb


icans

 

C.



albica

ns

à



C.

parapsilosis

S.

cerevisiae



R.

rubra


Trichosporon

sp.


E.

flocc


osum

M.

cani



s

T

.



interdigitale

§

T.



rubrum

A.



niger

A.

flavus



A.

fumigatus

Pen

icillium


sp.

Tea


tree

oil


MIC

0

Æ50



Æ25

0

Æ25



0

Æ25


0

Æ06


0

Æ12


0

Æ03


0

Æ016


0

Æ03


0

Æ016


0

Æ12


0

Æ06


0

Æ12


0

Æ03


MFC

0

Æ50



Æ50

Æ5

0



Æ50

Æ5

0



Æ12

0

Æ25



0

Æ25


0

Æ50


Æ12

4

4



2

2

Terpi



nen-4-ol

MIC


0

Æ25


0

Æ12


0

Æ12


0

Æ12


0

Æ25


0

Æ12


0

Æ008


0

Æ008


0

Æ016


0

Æ016


0

Æ06


0

Æ016


0

Æ016


0

Æ008


MFC

0

Æ25



0

Æ25


0

Æ25


0

Æ25


0

Æ25


0

Æ25


0

Æ016


0

Æ12


0

Æ25


0

Æ06


0

Æ50


Æ50

Æ50


Æ5

c-Terpinene

MIC

>8

>8



>8

88

8



1

44

1



>

8

>



8

>

8



8

MFC


>8

>8

>8



>8

>8

8



2

>8

8



2

>8

>8



>8

>8

a



-Terpinene

MIC


>8

>8

>8



88

4

0



Æ12

11

0



Æ58

8

8



4

MFC


>8

>8

>8



>8

8

4



0

Æ25


42

1

>



8

>

8



>

8

8



Terpi

nolene


MIC

>8

>8



>8

ND

ND



4

0

Æ12



0

Æ51


0

Æ52


4

2

4



MFC

>8

>8



>8

ND

ND



4

N

R



2

1

1



2

4

2



4

a

-Terpineol



MIC

0

Æ12



0

Æ12


0

Æ25


0

Æ12


0

Æ12


0

Æ06


0

Æ016


0

Æ03


0

Æ008


0

Æ016


0

Æ03


0

Æ016


0

Æ016


0

Æ016


MFC

0

Æ25



0

Æ25


0

Æ25


0

Æ12


0

Æ12


0

Æ12


NR

0

Æ25



0

Æ12


0

Æ06


0

Æ50


Æ50

Æ50


Æ5

1,8-Cineole

MIC

448


11

2

0



Æ06

40

Æ50



Æ25

8

0



Æ54

4

MFC



848

11

4



0

Æ5

44



1

>

8



>

8

>



8

>

8



q

-Cymene


MIC

>8

>8



>8

>8

>8



>8

4

88



4

>

8



>

8

>



8

4

MFC



>8

>8

>8



>8

>8

>8



4

>8

>8



8

>

8



>

8

>



8

>

8



MIC,

minimum


inhibitory

concentration;

MFC,

minimum


fungicidal

concentration;

ND,

not


done;

NR,


not

reproducible

after

a

minimum



of

five


repeats.

*Listed


in

decreasing

order

of

composition.



 

ATCC


10231.

à

ATCC



90028.

§T.


mentagrophytes

var.


interdigitale

.



T.

mentagrophytes

var.

mentagrophytes



.

856


K . A . H A M M E R ET AL.

ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x



Time kill assays

Results of time kill assays are shown in Fig. 1. Data for 1%

c-terpinene, a-terpinene and q-cymene were very similar

and were indistinguishable by statistical analyses. The

results for c-terpinene only are shown as a representative

(Fig. 1e). Treatments causing decreases in viability of >3

log CFU ml

)1

within 30 min were 0Æ25% terpinen-4-ol, 1%



tea tree oil, and 0Æ5 and 1Æ0% 1,8-cineole. At 30 min, no

viable organisms were recovered from either 1,8-cineole

treatment. Treatments causing similar decreases in viability

but over a longer time period were 0Æ25% a-terpineol, 1%

a-terpinene, 1% c-terpinene, 1% q-cymene, and 0Æ25 and

0Æ5% tea tree oil. Treatments having only moderate or

negligible effects on C. albicans viability were 0Æ12%

a-terpineol, terpinen-4-ol and tea tree oil, 0Æ25% 1,8-cineole

and 1% terpinolene.

D I S C U S S I O N

Quantification of the antimicrobial activity of particular

essential oil components appears to be heavily influenced by

the test method, as evidenced by the large differences

between the MICs and MFCs obtained by the broth micro-

and macrodilution methods. While technical factors such as

Table 2 In vitro activity of tea tree oil and components (% v/v)

against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 obtained by the broth micro-

dilution and macrodilution methods

Tea tree oil/

component

Microdilution*

Macrodilution 

MIC

MFC


MIC

MFC


Tea tree oil

0Æ5


0Æ5

0Æ25


0Æ25

Terpinen-4-ol

0Æ25

0Æ25


0Æ12

0Æ25


c-Terpinene

>8

>8



0Æ5

1

a-Terpinene



>8

>8

0Æ5



1

Terpinolene

>8

>8

0Æ5



0Æ5

a-Terpineol

0Æ12

0Æ25


0Æ12

0Æ25


a-Pinene

0Æ12


0Æ12

0Æ12


0Æ25

1,8-Cineole

4

8

0Æ5



0Æ5

q-Cymene


>8

>8

0Æ5



0Æ5

Aromadendrene

0Æ25

0Æ5


0Æ25

1

Limonene



>8

>8

0Æ5



1

b-Myrcene

>8

>8

>2



>2

b-Pinene


0Æ002

0Æ002


<0Æ016

<0Æ016

Linalool


1

1

0Æ06



0Æ12

a-Phellandrene

4

8

1



2

MIC, minimum inhibitory concentration; MFC, minimum fungicidal

concentration.

*Final concentration of 0Æ001% Tween 80, data obtained at 48 h.

 Final concentration of 0Æ1% Tween 80, data obtained at 24 h.

(d)


7

6

5



4

3

2



7

6

5



4

3

2



7

6

5



4

3

2



0        1         2         3         4         5        6

0        1         2         3        4        5        6

Log CFU ml

–1 


Log CFU ml

–1 


Log CFU ml

–1 


Time (h)

Time (h)


(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Fig. 1 Time kill curves of (a) tea tree oil, (b)

terpinen-4-ol, (c) a-terpineol, (d) 1,8-cineole,

(e) c-terpinene and (f) terpinolene against

Candida albicans ATCC 10231. Cells were

treated with 0% (j), 0Æ12% (

s

), 0Æ25% (m),



0Æ5% (h) or 1Æ0% (d) component or tea tree

oil (v/v). Mean ±

S.E.M

S.E.M


.

C O M P O N E N T S O F T E A T R E E O I L

857

ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x



different assay volumes, extent of sealing and the concen-

tration of Tween 80 may have contributed to the contra-

dictory results, differences may also relate specifically to the

physical, molecular and chemical characteristics of tea tree

oil components. Most terpenes are of only limited solu-

bility in aqueous media. For example, the solubilities of

c-terpinene, a-terpinene, q-cymene, terpinolene and limon-

ene have been reported as being between 1Æ0 and 8Æ2 ppm

(Griffin et al. 1999). A major consideration for antimicrobial

activity assays is, therefore, how to achieve and maintain

adequate solubilization of the compound and physical

contact with the test organism. Surfactants have often been

incorporated into these assays to address this issue (Janssen

et al. 1987). In the current study, increasing the Tween 80

concentration from 0Æ001 to 0Æ1% in the microdilution assay

did not result in significantly lower MICs or MFCs, with

the exception of terpinolene. This suggests that the lack of

activity observed for these components in the microdilution

assay was not solely due to inadequate solubilization. The

prospect that the tea tree oil components may be dissolving

into or becoming otherwise irreversibly associated with the

polystyrene of the microtitre tray is supported by data in the

literature. Tea tree oil is known to interact with certain

plastic types and has been shown to both deform and

migrate through polymers such as low-density polyethylene

(Rowe 1999), although these effects are poorly documented.

The sorption of these less water-soluble components into

polystyrene has also been used as a technique for removing

them from solutions of tea tree oil (Brand et al. 2001).

Removal of these compounds by their association with the

polystyrene results in less of the component being in

solution and available to interact with the test organism, and

may explain why MICs and MFCs were considerably lower

when performed in glass bottles. Interestingly, MICs and

MFCs for terpinen-4-ol, a-terpineol and tea tree oil did not

differ significantly between methods, suggesting that the use

of microtitre trays, although not ideal, may still be

acceptable for these components and oil. Component

solubility must be considered when designing assays for

evaluating the antimicrobial activity of essential oil compo-

nents such as terpenes. Methods such as disc or well

diffusion are particularly unsuitable given that the size of the

zone of inhibition is dependent on the diffusion of mostly

water-insoluble compounds through an aqueous agar

medium (Janssen et al. 1987; Carson and Riley 1995).

Methodological considerations aside, most of the compo-

nents tested showed antifungal activity, and by grouping

those components similar in chemical composition and

structure, generalizations about their antifungal activity can

be made.


The monoterpene alcohols terpinen-4-ol, a-terpineol,

1,8-cineole and linalool had relatively good antifungal

activity with MICs and MFCs for some components that

were slightly lower those of tea tree oil. In addition,

terpinen-4-ol, a-terpineol and 1,8-cineole showed relatively

rapid killing effects against C. albicans in time kill assays.

Previously published data for both fungi and bacteria are in

agreement with these results (Moleyar and Narasimham

1986; Carson and Riley 1995; Griffin et al. 1999; Adegoke

et al. 2000; Cox et al. 2001; Inouye et al. 2001). Although

linalool differs slightly from the other monoterpene alcohols

because it is acyclic, this component still showed significant

antifungal activity. This suggests that the presence of the

alcohol moiety is a greater determinant of antifungal activity

than whether the component has a cyclic or acyclic

structure. The antimicrobial activity of terpenes, including

the monoterpene alcohols, has been attributed to their

interactions with cellular membranes (Sikkema et al. 1995).

At relatively low concentrations, these interactions may

result in changes such as inhibition of respiration (Uribe

et al. 1985) and alteration in permeability (Uribe et al. 1985;

Cox et al. 2000) and at higher concentrations effects such as

total loss of homeostasis, gross membrane damage and death

may occur (Carson et al. 2002). The monoterpene alcohols

are thought to be particularly antimicrobially active because

of their relatively high water solubility and the presence of

the alcohol moiety (Griffin et al. 1999; Dorman and Deans

2000).


The monocyclic terpenes c-terpinene, a-terpinene, ter-

pinolene, q-cymene, limonene and a-phellandrene showed

MICs and MFCs by macrodilution that were one or two

concentrations higher than those for tea tree oil. Similarly,

time kill assays showed these components to have antifun-

gal activity, although the rate of killing for c-terpinene,

a-terpinene, terpinolene and q-cymene could not be regar-

ded as rapid. Relatively slow kill rates have been reported

previously for these compounds (Cox et al. 2001). Earlier

reports of antimicrobial activity for these components are

confounded by methodological issues and a lack of

meaningful data for the filamentous fungi. As a result,

activity ranging from negligible (Carson and Riley 1995;

Dorman and Deans 2000) through to moderate or good

(Moleyar and Narasimham 1986; Himejima et al. 1992;

Griffin et al. 1999; Adegoke et al. 2000; Cox et al. 2001)

has been reported for these compounds. While not as active

as the monoterpene alcohols, these compounds are likely to

be active by similar mechanisms but activity may be limited

by their low solubilities in both aqueous media and

microbial membranes. Aromadendrene, the only sesquiter-

pene tested, showed activity similar to the monocyclic

terpenes, although a previous report found little antimi-

crobial activity, albeit by well diffusion (Dorman and

Deans 2000).

Myrcene, an acyclic monoterpene, showed no antifungal

activity, which is consistent with the little amount of

published data available for this component (Dorman and

858

K . A . H A M M E R ET AL.



ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x

Deans 2000; Jeon et al. 2001). The lack of activity observed

for this acyclic monoterpene suggests that the cyclic

structure of the cyclic monoterpenes may be contributing

significantly to their activity. However, generalizations from

this study are limited since only one nonalcohol acyclic

terpene was tested.

The bridged bicyclic terpenes a- and b-pinene showed

considerable antifungal activity, with b-pinene showing the

most. In general, these data are in agreement with previous

studies (Himejima et al. 1992; Adegoke et al. 2000),

although some studies have demonstrated little activity for

these components (Raman et al. 1995; Consentino et al.

1999; Mourey and Canillac 2002). The present study

showed that b-pinene was more active against C. albicans

than a-pinene, whereas previously, activities have been

shown as equivalent for C. utilis (Himejima et al. 1992) or

a-pinene was shown as the more active against C. albicans

(Griffin et al. 1999). There is no clear consensus yet as to

which pinene isomer is more antimicrobially active and the

differing activities of the enantiomers of both compounds

ought not to be discounted (Lis-Balchin et al. 1999). The

solubility of terpenes is hypothesized as correlating with

their antimicrobial activity (Sikkema et al. 1995). However,

the pinenes are examples of compounds with very low water

solubilities (Griffin et al. 1999) but relatively high antimi-

crobial activities. The reasons for this are so far unknown,

but may relate to properties of these components other than

solubility.

With the use of appropriate methods, this study has

identified that most of the components of tea tree oil have

activity against C. albicans and other fungi. This contradicts

several previous reports (Raman et al. 1995; Consentino

et al. 1999; Cox et al. 2001) and challenges beliefs about the

various attributes and properties of tea tree oil components,

such as that tea tree oil contains a single ÔactiveÕ component

terpinen-4-ol while many of the other components lack

activity (Mann et al. 2000).

The importance of investigating the activity of tea tree oil

components lies in gaining an understanding of the activity

of each component, and of how each component contributes

to the activity of the whole oil. Although some of the

components tested in this study are present at only very low

levels in whole oil, each may contribute to total activity and

attempts to eliminate components considered inactive may,

therefore, be counter-productive. In addition, several

aspects of the properties of tea tree oil components such

as synergistic action between two or more components or

other beneficial pharmacological or medicinal properties

have not yet been explored fully.

In conclusion, this study showed that a- and b-pinene and

the monoterpene alcohols had the lowest MICs and MFCs

against fungi, followed by the monocyclic terpenes. Data

from this study suggests that the use of polystyrene

microtitre trays in microdilution assays may result in an

underestimation of the antimicrobial activity of some

essential oil components and should, therefore, be avoided.

Appropriate methods for determining the susceptibility of

microorganisms to essential oil components require further

investigation, as does the activity of these components

against bacteria.

A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S

The assistance of the Discipline of Microbiology at The

University of Western Australia and the Division of

Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at The Western

Australian Centre for Pathology and Medical Research in

obtaining isolates is appreciated. This work was supported

by grants UWA-57A and 58A from the Rural Industries

Research and Development Corporation, Australia, and

Australian Bodycare Pty Ltd (Vissenbjerg, Denmark).

R E F E R E N C E S

Adegoke, G.O., Iwahashi, H., Komatsu, Y., Obuchi, K. and Iwahashi,

Y. (2000) Inhibition of food spoilage yeasts and aflatoxigenic moulds

by monoterpenes of the spice Aframomum danielli. Flavour and

Fragrance Journal 15, 147–150.

Bassett, I.B., Pannowitz, D.L. and Barnetson, R.St C. (1990) A

comparative study of tea-tree oil versus benzoylperoxide in the

treatment of acne. Medical Journal of Australia 153, 455–458.

Brand, C., Ferrante, A., Prager, R.H., Riley, T.V., Carson, C.F.,

Finlay-Jones, J.J. and Hart, P.H. (2001) The water soluble

components of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree

oil), suppress the production of superoxide by human monocytes,

but not neutrophils, activated in vitro. Inflammation Research 50,

213–219.

Brand, C., Grimbaldeston, M.A., Gamble, J.R., Drew, J., Finlay-

Jones, J.J. and Hart, P.H. (2002) Tea tree oil reduces the swelling

associated with the efferent phase of a contact hypersensitivity

response. Inflammation Research 51, 236–244.

Brophy, J.J., Davies, N.W., Southwell, I.A., Stiff, I.A. and Williams,

L.R. (1989) Gas chromatographic quality control for oil of Melaleuca

terpinen-4-ol type (Australian tea tree). Journal of Agricultural and

Food Chemistry 37, 1330–1335.

Buck, D.S., Nidorf, D.M. and Addino, J.G. (1994) Comparison of two

topical preparations for the treatment of onychomycosis: Melaleuca

alternifolia (tea tree) oil and clotrimazole. Journal of Family Practice

38, 601–605.

Caelli, M., Porteous, J., Carson, C.F., Heller, R. and Riley, T.V. (2000)

Tea tree oil as an alternative topical decolonization agent for

methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Journal of Hospital Infec-

tion 46, 236–237.

Carson, C.F. and Riley, T.V. (1995) Antimicrobial activity of the major

components of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. Journal of

Applied Bacteriology 78, 264–269.

Carson, C.F., Ashton, L., Dry, L., Smith, D.W. and Riley, T.V.

(2001) Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil gel (6%) for the treatment

C O M P O N E N T S O F T E A T R E E O I L

859


ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x

of recurrent herpes labialis. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

48, 450–451.

Carson, C.F., Mee, B.J. and Riley, T.V. (2002) Mechanism of action of

Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil on Staphylococcus aureus deter-

mined by time-kill, lysis, leakage, and salt tolerance assays and

electron microscopy. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 46,

1914–1920.

Consentino, S., Tuberoso, C.I.G., Pisano, B., Satta, M., Mascia, V.,

Arzedi, E. and Palmas, F. (1999) In vitro antimicrobial activity and

chemical composition of Sardinian Thymus essential oils. Letters in

Applied Microbiology 29, 130–135.

Cox, S.D., Mann, C.M., Markham, J.L., Bell, H.C., Gustafson, J.E.,

Warmington, J.R. and Wyllie, S.G. (2000) The mode of antimicro-

bial action of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil).

Journal of Applied Microbiology 88, 170–175.

Cox, S.D., Mann, C.M. and Markham, J.L. (2001) Interactions

between components of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia.

Journal of Applied Microbiology 91, 492–497.

Dorman, H.J.D. and Deans, S.G. (2000) Antimicrobial agents from

plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils. Journal of Applied

Microbiology 88, 308–316.

Griffin, S.G., Wyllie, S.G., Markham, J.L. and Leach, D.N. (1999)

The role of structure and molecular properties of terpenoids in

determining their antimicrobial activity. Flavour and Fragrance

Journal 14, 322–332.

Hammer, K.A., Carson, C.F. and Riley, T.V. (2000) Melaleuca

alternifolia (tea tree) oil inhibits germ tube formation by Candida

albicans. Medical Mycology 38, 355–362.

Hammer, K.A., Carson, C.F. and Riley, T.V. (2002) In vitro activity of

Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against dermatophytes and other

filamentous fungi. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 50, 195–

199.


Himejima, M., Hobson, K.R., Otsuka, T., Wood, D.L. and Kubo, I.

(1992). Antimicrobial terpenes from oleoresin of ponderosa pine tree

Pinus ponderosa: a defense mechanism against microbial invasion.

Journal of Chemical Ecology 18, 1809–1818.

Inouye, S., Tsuruoka, T., Uchida, K. and Yamaguchi, H. (2001) Effect

of sealing and Tween 80 on the antifungal susceptibility testing of

essential oils. Microbiology and Immunology 45, 201–208.

International Organisation for Standardisation (1996) Oil of Melaleuca,

Terpinen-4-ol Type (Tea Tree Oil) (ISO 4730:1996). Geneva,

Switzerland: International Organisation for Standardisation.

Janssen, A.M., Scheffer, J.J.C. and Baerheim-Svendsen, A. (1987)

Antimicrobial activity of essential oils: a 1976–1986 literature review,

aspects of the test methods. Planta Medica 53, 395–398.

Jeon, H.-J., Lee, K.-S. and Ahn, Y.-J. (2001) Growth-inhibiting effects

of constituents of Pinus densiflora leaves on human intestinal bacteria.

Food Science and Biotechnology 10, 403–407.

Koh, K.J., Marshman, G. and Hart, P.H. (2002) Tea tree oil reduces

histamine-induced skin inflammation. British Journal of Dermatology

147, 1212–1217.

Lis-Balchin, M., Ochocka, R.J., Deans, S.G., Asztemborska, M. and

Hart, S. (1999) Differences in bioactivity between the enantiomers of

a-pinene. Journal of Essential Oil Research 11, 393–397.

Mann, C.M., Cox, S.D. and Markham, J.L. (2000) The outer

membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 6749 contributes to

its tolerance to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil).

Letters in Applied Microbiology 30, 294–297.

Moleyar, V. and Narasimham, P. (1986) Antifungal activity of some

essential oil components. Food Microbiology 3, 331–336.

Mourey, A. and Canillac, N. (2002) Anti-Listeria monocytogenes activity

of essential oil components of conifers. Food Control 13, 289–292.

National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)

(1997) Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility

Testing of Yeasts. Approved Standard M27-A. Wayne, PA, USA:

NCCLS.


National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)

(1998) Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility

Testing of Conidium-forming Filamentous Fungi. Proposed Standard

M38-P. Wayne, PA, USA: NCCLS.

Raman, A., Weir, U. and Bloomfield, S.F. (1995) Antimicrobial effects

of tea-tree oil and its major components on Staphylococcus aureus,

Staph. epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes. Letters in Applied

Microbiology 21, 242–245.

Rowe, J.S. (1999) Formulating for effect. In Tea Tree: the Genus

Melaleuca ed. Southwell, I. and Lowe, R. pp. 207–212. Amsterdam,

The Netherlands: Harwood Academic Publishers.

Satchell, A.C., Saurajen, A., Bell, C. and Barnetson, R.St.C. (2002a)

Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% tea tree oil

solution: a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded study. Austra-

lasian Journal of Dermatology 43, 175–178.

Satchell, A.C., Saurajen, A., Bell, C. and Barnetson, R.St.C. (2002b)

Treatment of dandruff with 5% tea tree oil shampoo. Journal of the

American Academy of Dermatology 47, 852–855.

Sikkema, J., de Bont, J.A.M. and Poolman, B. (1995) Mechanisms of

membrane toxicity of hydrocarbons. Microbiological Reviews 59, 201–

222.

Tong, M.M., Altman, P.M. and Barnetson, R.St.C. (1992) Tea tree oil



in the treatment of tinea pedis. Australasian Journal of Dermatology

33, 145–149.

Uribe, S., Ramirez, J. and Pen˜a, A. (1985) Effects of b-pinene on yeast

membrane functions. Journal of Bacteriology 161, 1195–1200.

Vazquez, J.A. and Zawawi, A.A. (2002) Efficacy of alcohol-based and

alcohol-free melaleuca oral solution for the treatment of fluconazole-

refractory oral candidiasis in patients with AIDS. AIDS 12, 1033–

1037.


860

K . A . H A M M E R ET AL.



ª 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology, 95, 853–860, doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2003.02059.x


Yüklə 113,88 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə