Approved Conservation Advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for



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This Conservation Advice was approved by the Minister / Delegate of the Minister on: 

1/10/2008 

Approved Conservation Advice  

(s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) 



Approved Conservation Advice for 

Verticordia albida (White Featherflower) 

This Conservation Advice has been developed based on the best available information at the 

time this Conservation Advice was approved; this includes existing plans, records or 

management prescriptions for this species. 



Description 

Verticordia albida

,

 



Family Myrtaceae, also known as White Featherflower, is

 

a shrub 



growing 0.3–2.6 m high. Flowers grow in dense spikes and are white, cream or pink, with a 

pink centre. Petals are 4–5 mm long with a 1 mm long fringe. Flowering occurs in November 

to January. Leaves are 2–4.5 mm wide and are rounded, with smooth margins (FloraBase, 

1996; Brown et al., 1998). 

This species hybridises with V. muelleriana; hybrids have flowers varying from creamish-

white to pale pink on separate plants or on the same plant (Patrick and Brown, 2001).  



Conservation Status 

White Featherflower is listed as endangered.



 

This species



 

is eligible for listing as

 

endangered



 

under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cwlth) (EPBC 

Act) as, prior to the commencement of the EPBC Act, it was listed as

 

endangered under 



Schedule 1 of the Endangered Species Protection Act 1992 (Cwlth). White Featherflower is 

also listed as declared rare flora under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia). 



Distribution and Habitat 

White Featherflower is known from

 

three populations less than two km apart, south-west of 



Three Springs in Western AustraliaThis species grows in white-grey to yellow sand over 

gravel or laterite, in scrub or thicket up to 3 m high. All three known populations occur near 

roads. Associated species include Banksia prionotes, Callitris sp., Eucalyptus todtiana, and 

Jacksonia sp. (Brown et al., 1998; Patrick and Brown, 2001). This species

 

occurs within the 

Northern Agricultural (Western Australia) Natural Resource Management Region. 

The distribution of this species is not known to overlap with any EPBC Act-listed threatened 

ecological communities. 

Threats 

The main identified threats to White Featherflower are broad-scale vegetation clearing; 

grazing pressure; exotic weed invasion; changed fire regime; and salinity due to changes to 

hydrology (Beecham, 2001; ANRA, 2007).



 

The main potential threats to White Featherflower include



 

dieback caused by Phytophthora 



cinnamomi (Brown et al., 1998; Patrick and Brown, 2001) and road widening or maintenance. 

Research Priorities 

Research priorities that would inform future regional and local priority actions include: 

 

Design and implement a monitoring program or, if appropriate, support and enhance 



existing programs. 

 



More precisely assess population size, distribution, ecological requirements and the 

relative impacts of threatening processes. 



Verticordia albida Conservation Advice - Page 1 of 3 

 


This Conservation Advice was approved by the Minister / Delegate of the Minister on: 

1/10/2008 

 

Undertake survey work in suitable habitat and potential habitat to locate any additional 



populations/occurrences/remnants.  

 



Undertake seed germination and/or vegetative propagation trials to determine the 

requirements for successful establishment.  

 

Assess susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi, and implement appropriate control 



measures. 

Regional and Local Priority Actions  

The following regional and local priority recovery and threat abatement actions can be done 

to support the recovery of White Featherflower. 

Habitat Loss, Disturbance and Modification 

 

Monitor known populations to identify key threats.  



 

Monitor the progress of recovery, including the effectiveness of management actions and 



the need to adapt them if necessary. 

 



Identify populations of high conservation priority. 

 



Minimise adverse impacts from land use at known sites. 

 



Ensure road widening and maintenance activities (or other infrastructure or development 

activities) involving vegetation or substrate disturbance in areas where White 

Featherflower occurs do not adversely impact on known populations. 

 



Manage any changes to hydrology that may result in changes to the water table levels, 

increased run-off, and salinity. 

 

Investigate formal conservation arrangements, management agreements and covenants on 



private land, and for crown and private land investigate inclusion in reserve tenure if 

possible. 

Invasive Weeds 

 



Develop and implement a management plan for the control of exotic weeds in the region. 

 



Manage sites to prevent introduction of invasive weeds, which could become a threat to 

White Featherflower, using appropriate methods. 

 

Ensure chemicals or other mechanisms used to eradicate weeds do not have a significant 



adverse impact on White Featherflower. 

Trampling, Browsing or Grazing 

 

Develop and implement a stock management plan for roadside verges and travelling stock 



routes. 

 



Ensure that livestock grazing, if it occurs in the area, uses an appropriate management 

regime and density that does not detrimentally affect this species. 

 

Where appropriate manage total grazing pressure at important/significant sites through 



exclusion fencing or other barriers. 

Fire 


 

Develop and implement a suitable fire management strategy for White FeatherflowerThe 



species should be protected from frequent fire where possible (Brown et al., 1998). 

 



Identify appropriate intensity and interval of fire to promote seed germination and

 

vegetation regeneration.  

 

Provide maps of known occurrences to local and state Rural Fire Services and seek 



inclusion of mitigative measures in bush fire risk management plans, risk register and/or 

operation maps. 

Diseases, Fungi and Parasites 

 



Develop and implement suitable hygiene protocols to protect known sites from outbreaks 

of dieback caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi.  



Verticordia albida Conservation Advice - Page 2 of 3 

 


This Conservation Advice was approved by the Minister / Delegate of the Minister on: 

1/10/2008 

Conservation Information 

 



Raise awareness of White Featherflower within the local community. 

Enable Recovery of Additional Sites and/or Populations 

 

Undertake appropriate seed collection and storage. 



 

Investigate options for linking, enhancing or establishing additional populations. 



 

Implement national translocation protocols (Vallee et al., 2004) if establishing additional 



populations is considered necessary and feasible.  

 

This list does not necessarily encompass all actions that may be of benefit to White 

Featherflower, but highlights those that are considered to be of highest priority at the time of 

preparing the conservation advice.  



Existing Plans/Management Prescriptions that are Relevant to the Species 

 



Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root-Rot Fungus Phytophthora 

cinnamomii (EA, 2001), as this species may be susceptible to this fungus, 

 



Western Australian Wildlife Management Program No. 28: Declared Rare and Poorly 

Known Flora in the Moora District (Patrick and Brown, 2001), and 

 

Interim Recovery Plan (IRP 95):



 

White Featherflower, Verticordia albida (NatureBase, 

2007). 

These prescriptions were current at the time of publishing; please refer to the relevant 



agency’s website for any updated versions.   

 

Information Sources: 

Australian Natural Resources Atlas (ANRA) 2007, Biodiversity Assessment - Avon Wheatbelt: Species at risk 

and the Threatening Process, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, viewed 21 May 

2008, <


http://www.anra.gov.au/topics/vegetation/assessment/wa/ibra-aw-species-threats.html

>.  


Beecham, B 2001, Avon Wheatbelt 1 (AW1 - Ancient Drainage subregion), Department of Conservation and 

Land Management (CALM), viewed 21 May 2008, <

http://www.naturebase.net/pdf/science/bio_audit/ 

avon_wheatbelt01_p7-35.pdf

>.  

Brown, A, Thomson-Dans, C, & Marchant, N (Eds.) 1998, Western Australia's Threatened Flora, CALM, 



Como. 

Environment Australia (EA) 2001, Threat Abatement Plan For Dieback caused by the root-rot fungus 



Phytophthora cinnamoni, Environment Australia, viewed 21 May 2008, 

<

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/phytophthora/pubs/phytophthora.pdf

>. 

FloraBase 1996, FloraBase Profile: Verticordia albida, Department of Conservation and Land Management 



(CALM), viewed 21 May 2008, <

http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/12389

>.   

NatureBase 2007, List of endorsed WA Interim Recovery Plans (IRP) (as at December 2007), Western Australia 



Department of Environment and Conservation, viewed 21 May 2008, <

https://www.naturebase.net/component/ 

option,com_docman/task,doc_download/gid,2167/

>.  


Patrick, SJ and Brown, AP 2001, Western Australian Wildlife Management Program No. 28: Declared Rare and 

Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District, WA Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, WA 

CALM. 


Vallee, L, Hogbin, T, Monks, L, Makinson, B, Matthes, M & Rossetto, M 2004, Guidelines for the 

Translocation of Threatened Plants in Australia (2

nd

 ed.), Australian Network for Plant Conservation, Canberra. 



 

Verticordia albida Conservation Advice - Page 3 of 3 

 

Document Outline

  • Description
  • Conservation Status
  • Distribution and Habitat
  • Threats
  • Research Priorities
    • Habitat Loss, Disturbance and Modification
    • Invasive Weeds
    • Trampling, Browsing or Grazing
    • Fire
    • Diseases, Fungi and Parasites
    • Conservation Information
    • Enable Recovery of Additional Sites and/or Populations
    •  Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root-Rot Fungus Phytophthora cinnamomii (EA, 2001), as this species may be susceptible to this fungus,
  • Information Sources:
    • Beecham, B 2001, Avon Wheatbelt 1 (AW1 - Ancient Drainage subregion), Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM), viewed 21 May 2008,

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