Astron Environmental Services



Yüklə 19,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü19,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

67
00
00
0
67
50
00
0
68
00
00
0
68
50
00
0
Author: M. Gardener
Date:  12-12-2012
Drawn: C. Dyde
Figure Ref: 16002-12FMV1RevA_20121212_Fig01
±
Datum:  GDA 1994  -  Projection:  MGA Zone 50
Figure 1: Location of Hinge Survey Area
Karara Mining Ltd.
Hinge Vegetation and Flora Survey 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Km
Legend
"
Localities
Hinge Survey Area
DEC Managed Lands
River
Rail
Principal Road
Minor Road
M
ULLE
WA
 - W
UB
IN
 R
O
AD
GR
EA
T N
OR
TH
ER

HI
GH
W
AY
Survey Area
Weelhamby Lake
Nature Reserve
"
"
"
"
"
"
PERTH
MORAWA
ALBANY
NORTHAM
GERALDTON
MOUNT MAGNET
Map
Extent
W e s t e r n
W e s t e r n
A u s t r a l i a
A u s t r a l i a
ex Karara
ex Warriedar
ex Kadji Kadji
Bowgarder
Nature Reserve
ex Lochada
ex Thundelarra
ex Barnong

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 4 
This page has been left blank intentionally.

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 5 
1.3
 
Environmental Context 
1.3.1
 
Climate and Seasonal Conditions 
The  survey  area  is  located  within  the  Yalgoo  subregion  of  Western  Australia.  The  climate  of  this 
region is classified as Mediterranean, semi-arid to arid and warm, with two distinct seasons: a hot 
and dry summer (December to February) and a mild and wet winter (June to August) (Payne et al. 
1998; Markey and Dillon 2006). The  region  is characterised by a  moderately variable rainfall, with 
rainfall  events  being  restricted  to  local  areas  rather  than  being  widespread  (Markey  and  Dillon 
2006). The majority of all rainfall received occurs during winter months and is typically derived from 
rain-bearing cold fronts associated with the westerly wind system. Irregular summer rainfall occurs 
in association with thunderstorms and heavy downpours that are the remnants of tropical cyclones 
(Markey and Dillon 2006). 
Climatic  data  was  obtained  from  the  nearest  public  weather  station  at  Morawa  Airport  (Station 
8296), which is approximately 85 km south-west of the survey area. Based on 15 years of data, the 
mean  annual  rainfall  at  this  location  is  289  millimetres  (mm)  with  May  to  September  being  the 
wettest  months  (Bureau  of  Meteorology  (BoM)  2012).  The  mean  maximum  temperatures  exceed 
30 

C between November and March and drop to 20 

C or below during the winter months (Figure 
2). Rainfall prior to the survey period was below average in all months except for June when there 
was 97 mm (Figure 2). 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
J
a
n
u
a
ry
F
e
b
ru
a
ry
M
a
rc
h
A
p
ri
l
M
a
y
J
u
n
e
J
u
ly
A
u
g
u
s
t
S
e
p
te
m
b
e
r
O
c
to
b
e
r
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r
D
e
c
e
m
b
e
r
T
e
m
p
e
ra
tu
re
 (
 
C

R
a
in
fa
ll
 (
m
m
)
Month
Monthly rainf all prior to 2012  survey 
Long-term mean  monthly rainf all
Long-term mean  monthly maximum temperature
 
Figure 2: Climate data for Morawa Airport (Station 8296) (BoM 2012). 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 6 
1.3.2
 
Geology and Landform 
The  main  continental  blocks  that  make  up  the  Australian  continent  are  the  Yilgarn,  Pilbara  and 
Gawler Cratons and the Wilyama Block (Lane 2004). Broadly, the survey area is located within the 
Murchison  Province  of  the  Yilgarn  Craton.  The  Yilgarn  Craton  is  comprised  of  material  from  the 
Archaean (2.5 billion years ago) to Cainozoic ages (66 million years ago to present) and bound in the 
west by the Murgoo Gneiss Complex of the Western Gneiss Terrane and to the east by the Southern 
Cross Province. The Archaean rocks of the Murchison and Southern Cross Provinces comprise linear 
to arcuate,  north to north-west  trending greenstone belts,  which have  been intruded by granitoid 
rocks.  The  greenstones  contain  volcanic  rocks,  felsic  volcanic  rocks  and  metasedimentary  rocks 
including  cherts  and  banded  iron  formation  (BIF),  and  the  granitoid  rocks  contain  adamellites, 
granite, gneiss and migamite (Payne et al. 1998).  
The  survey  area  is  located  within  the  Yalgoo-Singleton  Archaean  greenstone  belt.  The  survey  area 
contains  a  low  ridge  with  gentle  slopes  oriented  in  a  north  easterly  orientation.  The  soils  in  the 
region are derived from old lateritic profiles, approximately 50 million years ago, at a time when the 
climate  was  wetter.  The  ridge  consists  of  shallow  stony  soils  (<  50  centimetres),  with  some 
outcropping flanked by alluvial and sand plains. 
1.3.3
 
Surface Water 
The Murchison and Greenough Rivers are the two principal drainage systems in the Yalgoo bioregion 
and drain into the Murchison/Gascoyne, Yarra Yarra and Ninghan catchment areas. The Murchison 
River extends approximately 820 km from the southern slopes of the Robinson Ranges (75 km north 
of Meekatharra) to the  Indian Ocean at  Kalbarri. The  Greenough River is approximately 340 km in 
length,  spanning  from  the  Woojalong  Hills  on  the  Yilgarn  Plateau  to  the  Indian  Ocean  at  Cape 
Burney,  9  km  south  of  Geraldton.  Neither  of  these  rivers,  nor  their  tributaries  occurs  within  the 
survey  area  (Department  of  Sustainability,  Environment,  Water,  Population  and  Communities 
(DSEWPC) 2009). 
There  are  two  wetlands  of  national  significance  within  the  Yalgoo  bioregion;  Thundelarra  Lignum 
Swamp and Wagga Wagga Salt Lake (Environment Australia 2001). Neither is located within 10 km of 
the  survey area. Two lakes within the bioregion  are classified as wetlands of regional significance; 
Lake  Monger,  which  lies  approximately  55  km  south  of  the  survey  area,  and  Lake  Moore,  located 
approximately 90 km south-east of the survey area.  
1.3.4
 
Land Systems 
A land system is an area with a recurring pattern of topography, soils and vegetation (Christian and 
Stewart  1953).  The  land  system  approach  to mapping  different  surface  types  has  been  used  in  all 
Western  Australian  regional  rangeland  surveys.  The  biophysical  resources,  including  soil  and 
vegetation  condition,  of  the  Sandstone-Yalgoo-Paynes  region  were  surveyed  between  1992  and 
1993, resulting in the delineation of 20 land surface types comprising 76 land systems (Payne et al. 
1998).  Five  of  these  land  systems  occur  within  the  survey  area  (Table  1).  The  Tallering  ridge  is 
flanked by  Euchre alluvial plains  and Joseph  and Yowie  sand plains (Appendix A;  Table  A.  1). Land 
systems mapping is presented in Appendix A.
 
 
 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 7 
Table 1: Distribution of land systems within the survey area and the Yalgoo region (Payne et al. 1998). 
Land 
system 
Description 
Total area (ha) in 
the Yalgoo region  
Area (ha) within survey 
area and percent (%) of 
total 
Euchre 
Low granite breakaways with alluvial plains and 
sandy tracts supporting eucalypt woodlands 
and acacia shrublands. 
88,578  
111 (0.13) 
Joseph 
Undulating yellow sandplain supporting dense 
mixed shrublands with patchy mallees. 
217,409  
153 (0.07) 
Tallering 
Prominent ridges and hills of banded ironstone, 
dolerite and sedimentary rocks. 
31,486 
187 (0.59) 
Tealtoo 
Level to gently undulating loamy plains with 
fine ironstone lag gravel supporting dense 
acacia shrublands. 
19,215 
18 (0.09) 
Yowie 
Loamy plains supporting shrublands of mulga 
and bowgada with patchy wanderrie grasses. 
357,418 
293 (0.08) 
1.3.5
 
Bioregional Summaries 
1.3.5.1
 
Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia 
The  Interim  Biogeographic  Regionalisation  for  Australia  (IBRA)  is  a  landscape-based  approach  to 
classifying the land surface, including attributes of climate, geomorphology, landform, lithology, and 
characteristic flora and fauna. Specialist ecological knowledge, combined with appropriate  regional 
and  continental  scale  biophysical  datasets  were  interpreted  to  define  and  describe  these  regions 
(Thackway  and  Cresswell  1995).  Information  about  each  region  is  used  to  help  determine  which 
ecosystems  are  adequately  protected  in  the  conservation  estate.  In  a  2012  revision,  a  number  of 
regional changes occurred, including moving the western boundary of the Yalgoo bioregion to the 
coast, truncating the northern portion of the Geraldton Sandplains bioregion (DSEWPC 2012b). The 
survey area occurs in the Yalgoo bioregion, of which greater than 30% is represented in the national 
reserve system (DSEWPC 2012a). 
The Yalgoo bioregion represents an interzone between south western bioregions and the Murchison 
bioregion.  It  is  characterised  by  Callitris,  Eucalyptus  salubris,  mulga  (Acacia  aff.  aneura)  and 
bowgada  (Acacia  ramulosa)  open  woodlands  and  scrubs  on  earth  to  sandy-earth  plains  in  the 
western Yilgarn Craton and southern Carnarvon Basin. It is a region rich in ephemeral flora species 
and occurs in an arid to semi-arid warm Mediterranean climate (DSEWPC 2009). 
1.3.5.2
 
Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia 
As  part  of  the  National  Land  and  Water  Resources  Biodiversity  Audit,  the  Department  of 
Conservation  and  Land  Management  (CALM,  now  DEC)  conducted  an  audit  of  Western  Australia’s 
terrestrial biodiversity (CALM 2002). The audit aimed to assess priority for reservation based on the 
subregions  defined  in  IBRA  version  5.1  (Environment  Australia  2000).  The  bioregional  summaries 
(CALM 2002) also categorised ecosystems as ‘low’, ‘medium’ or ‘high’ depending on their priority for 
reservation  in  the  conservation  estate;  and  those  considered  to  be  ‘at  risk’  within  each  IBRA 
subregion. Some of these ecosystems listed as ‘at risk’ were subsequently formally gazetted as TECs 
under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950.  Approximately  10  -  15%  of  the  Yalgoo  subregion  is 
represented in the national reserve system (Desmond and Chant 2001).  

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 8 
1.3.6
 
Broad Scale Vegetation and Flora 
The  survey  area  occurs  within  the  Yalgoo  sub-region  of  the  Austin  botanical  district,  within  the 
Murchison botanical region. The Murchison region generally coincides with the upper edges of the 
Yilgarn  Block,  and  is  dominated  by  granite,  gneiss  and  metamorphic  geology.  It  is  divided  into  six 
sub-regions,  but  has  many  vegetation  features  which  are  common  to  all.  The  region  represents  a 
district within the Eremaean Botanical Province, and is a transition zone to the South-West Botanical 
province,  which  occurs  further  south.  This  transition  is  expressed  as  a  shift  from  mulga  low 
woodland in the north, to acacia and eucalypt dominated woodlands in the south (Beard 1976).  
The survey area occurs in the south-west of the Yalgoo sub-region. In this area, hills are dominated 
by  Acacia  ramulosa  and  A.  acuminata  scrub,  mid-slopes  are  characterised  by  A.  ramulosa,  A. 
acuminata  and  Melaleuca  uncinata,  the  sandplains  are  characterised  by  A.  ramulosa  and  A. 
murrayana. Scattered Callitris sp. and Eucalyptus sp. trees are characteristic of the vegetation in the 
valleys  (Beard  1976).  Beard  (1976)  mapped  pre-European  vegetation  types  across  the  Murchison 
region at a scale of 1: 1,000,000. The survey area is comprised of only one pre-European vegetation 
association (Beard 1976), which is summarised in Table 2.  
Table 2: Pre-European (Beard 1976) vegetation associations within the survey area. 
Beard 
physiographic 
unit 
Beard 
vegetation 
unit† 
Vegetation description 
Total area (ha) 
in the Yalgoo 
region  
Area (ha) within 
survey area and 
percent (%) of total 
Yalgoo 
420 
Shrublands; bowgada 
(Acacia ramulosa) & jam 
scrub (A. acuminata). 
455,432 
761 (0.17) 

 
Numbers representing the Beard vegetation associations are those that have been assigned by Shepherd et al. (2002).
 
1.3.7
 
Vegetation and Flora Conservation Categories 
Commonwealth and Western Australian regulatory authorities maintain databases of the locations 
and conservation status of significant ecological communities and flora species in Western Australia. 
The EPBC Act provides a legal framework to protect and manage matters of national environmental 
significance including listed ecological communities and flora species. Listed ecological communities 
and flora species are allocated a conservation category, which are outlined in Appendices B and C. 
A  TEC  is  an  ecological  community  that  has  been  identified  by  the  Commonwealth  Minister  for 
Environment as being subject to processes that threaten to destroy or significantly modify it across 
much of its range. TECs are listed under one of four categories as outlined in Appendix B. The DEC 
also maintains a list of priority ecological communities (PEC). PECs are assigned one of four priority 
rankings  according  to  the  criteria  outlined  in  Appendix  B.  Unlike  TECs,  PECs  are  not  formally 
recognised by the Minister for Environment but are considered significant by regulating authorities 
during environmental impact assessment. 
Under  Western  Australian  legislation,  all  native  flora  are  protected  and  it  is  an  offence  to  ‘take’ 
protected flora. To ‘take’ includes the removal of seeds or injuring plants. The Wildlife Conservation 
Act  1950  also  provides  for  native  plant  species  to  be  specially  protected  because  they  are  under 
identifiable threat of extinction, are rare, or otherwise in need of special protection. Such specially 
protected flora is considered under the Act to be threatened. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 9 
Due to the diversity of Western Australia’s flora, many species are known from only a few collections 
or  locations,  but  have  not  been  adequately  surveyed.  Such  flora  may  be  rare  or  threatened,  but 
cannot  be  considered  for  declaration  as  threatened  flora  until  adequate  surveys  have  been 
undertaken. These flora species are included on a supplementary conservation list called the priority 
flora list. Three categories of priority flora cover these poorly known species.  A fourth category of 
priority flora includes species that have been adequately surveyed and are considered to be rare but 
not  currently  threatened  and  a  fifth  category  of  priority  flora  includes  conservation  dependent 
species. Western Australian flora conservation categories are described in Appendix C. 
1.3.8
 
Introduced Flora Categories 
The Australian Weed Strategy  (Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council (NRMMC) 2007) 
identifies  ‘Weeds  of  National  Significance’.  Weeds  of  National  Significance  are  invasive,  with  the 
potential to impact primary industry and/or environmental and social values. 
The  management  of  introduced  flora  in  Western  Australia  is  primarily  regulated  through  the 
provisions  of  the  Agriculture  and  Related  Resources  Protection  Act  1976,  and  the  Biosecurity  and 
Agriculture Management Act 2007. A list of Declared Plants has been gazetted under the Agriculture 
and Related Resources Protection Act 1976. Listed species are allocated one of five priority ratings 
that define the required level of management (Appendix D). 
The  invasive  plant  prioritisation  (IPP)  process  (DEC  2011)  was  developed  to  supersede  the 
Environmental  Weed  Strategy  for  Western  Australia  (CALM  1999).  The  prioritisation  process 
considers both a “species-led” and a “site-led” approach to priority setting for weed management on 
DEC  managed  lands.  The  IPP  process  rating  system  is  presented  in  Appendix  D,  Table  D.2.  The 
prioritisation results for individual weeds should be utilised as a guide  only and does  not  diminish 
any other requirements (statutory or otherwise).  
1.3.9
 
Land Tenure and Use 
The  survey  area  is  located  in  the  Shire  of  Perenjori  on  the  former  Lochada  Station  (Figure  1). 
Between  2000  and  2004,  a  number  of  pastoral  leases  including  Lochada,  Kadji  Kadji,  Karara, 
Warriedar, and Thundelarra were transferred to unallocated Crown land with interim management 
by the DEC. The DEC took over the management of Lochada in 2000 and the sheep were removed at 
the end of 2001. The ex-station is currently managed by the DEC for conservation purposes under 
Section 33 (2) of the Conservation and Land Management Act 1984. Two mining tenements held by 
KML make up the survey area. E59/817 and E59/1170 were granted on 3 April 2001 and 1 November 
2005 respectively. 
  

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 10 
2
 
Methodology 
2.1
 
Desktop Assessment 
2.1.1
 
Database Searches 
Database  searches  were  conducted  in  August  2012,  to  identify  conservation  significant  flora 
communities and flora species within the survey area, or known from a 50 km radius listed under the 
Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 and the EPBC Act. The search details are summarised in Appendix E. 
2.1.2
 
Literature Review 
A number of vegetation and flora surveys have been conducted within 100 km of the Hinge survey 
area. A selection of the reports from these surveys was reviewed to compare vegetation and flora 
values and include: 

 
Astron Environmental Services 2012a. Karara Expansion vegetation and flora survey. 
Consultant’s report prepared for Karara Mining Ltd. 

 
Astron Environmental Services 2012b. Karara Mungada Ridge vegetation and flora survey. 
Consultant’s report prepared for Karara Mining Ltd. 

 
Botanica 2012. Level 2 flora and vegetation survey and priority flora search of the Shine 
Project. Consultant’s report prepared for Karara Mining Ltd. 

 
Woodman Environmental Consulting 2012. Regional flora and vegetation survey of the 
Karara to Minjar Block. Consultant’s report prepared for Karara Mining Ltd. 

 
Botanica 2011. Level 1 flora and vegetation survey for the Jasper Hill and Hinge. Consultant’s 
report prepared for Karara Mining Limited. 

 
Markey, A.S., and Dillon, S. J. 2008a. Flora and vegetation of the banded iron formation of 
the Yilgarn Craton: Yalgoo. Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth.  

 
Markey, A.S., and Dillon, S. J. 2008b. Flora and vegetation of the banded iron formation of 
the Yilgarn Craton: central Tallering Land System. Department of Environment and 
Conservation, Perth. 
 

 
Woodman Environmental Consulting 2007. Karara-Mungada Project survey area flora and 
vegetation. Consultant’s report prepared for Gindalbie Metals Limited. 

 
Bennett Environmental Consulting 2004. Flora and vegetation Blue Hills. Consultant’s report 
prepared for ATA Environmental. 

 
Paul Armstrong and Associates. 2003. Vegetation assessment and rare flora search between 
Perenjori and Mt Gibson. Consultant’s report prepared for Mount Gibson Iron Limited.  
Where these reports included part of a Level 2 survey component, they were reviewed to determine 
the size of the survey area, and the number of vascular plant species, priority flora species, PECs and 
TECs that were recorded. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə