Astron Environmental Services



Yüklə 19,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü19,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

 
Field Survey 
The  field  survey  was  undertaken  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  for  a  Level  2  assessment 
outlined  in  the  EPA’s  Position  Statement  3:  Terrestrial  Biological  Surveys  as  an  Element  of 
Biodiversity Protection (2002), and Guidance Statement 51: Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys 
for  Environmental  Impact  Assessment  in  Western  Australia  (EPA  2004),  and  DEC’s  Recommended 
Interim Protocol for Flora Surveys of Banded Iron Formations (BIF) of the Yilgarn Craton (CALM, 2007) 
Information acquired during the desktop study assisted in the design of the field survey. Pre-survey 
planning  involved  the  examination  of  1:  10,000  scale  aerial  photography  of  the  survey  area.  The 
number and location of quadrat sites were determined based on the following criteria: 

 
minimum of two quadrats per vegetation unit except those confined to a small area (EPA 
2004) 

 
FCTs with larger heterogeneity  should have proportionally  more quadrats (CALM 2007) 

 
the inclusion of target areas that are prospective for listed ecological communities and flora 
species identified during the desktop study 

 
the availability of safe access to the site. 
In  the  survey  area,  Woodman  (2012)  sampled  a  total  of  nine  quadrats  in  six  of  the  eight  FCTs, 
whereas this survey sampled 24 quadrats in all FCTs except 17, which was sampled using a mapping 
note because of its small area (Table 3). Locations of Astron and Woodman transects are shown in 
Figure 3. 
Table 3: Summary of FCTs intersecting with the Hinge survey area and quadrats sampled. 
Woodman (2012) 
FCT code 
Area (ha) 
Number of 
Woodman (2012) 
quadrats 
Number of Astron 
quadrats (2012) 

95.5 



156.9 


10 
15.9 


13 
157.4 


17 
1.4 

0* 
18 
57.0 


19a 
216.8 


26 
47.2 


32 
13.7 


* A mapping note was taken in FCT 17. 
The field survey was conducted over one field visit from 24 September to 3 October 2012. The field 
team  included  Mark  Gardener  (Supervising  Botanist),  Natalie  Krawczyk  (Botanist),  Jo  Smartt 
(Botanist)  and  Louise  Kitscha  (Botanist).  All  of  the  team  are  experienced  in  conducting  Level  2 
vegetation  and  flora  surveys.  Natalie  Krawczyk  and  Jo  Smartt  were  team  members  in  the  prior 
Karara  surveys  in  Mungada  Ridge  and  Expansion  areas  during  August/September  2012  and  were 
therefore especially familiar with the flora. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 12 
A  total of 24  permanent  quadrats  (see  Figure  3  for  locations)  measuring  20  metre  (m)  x  20 m  (as 
recommended  by  CALM 2007)  were  surveyed in representative vegetation  units  within the survey 
area. The north-west, south-west, north-east and south-east corners of each quadrat were aligned 
with  the  aid  of  an  optical  square  and  measuring  tapes,  and  each  corner  was  marked  with  a 
galvanised steel fence dropper. A permanent identifying label was attached to the north-west fence 
dropper.  
The following information was collected at each quadrat: 

 
Location – coordinates measured using a handheld GPS (MGA50, GDA94) at each corner.  

 
Recorder and date – a list of the personnel involved in sampling the quadrat and the date. 

 
Species – all vascular plant species present. To ensure a thorough search, each quadrat was 
traversed systematically at approximately two metre intervals. Species that could not be 
identified in the field were collected for later identification at the Astron herbarium or 
Western Australian Herbarium. 

 
Percentage Foliar Cover – the percentage foliar cover (PFC) was estimated for each species. 

 
Vegetation description – vegetation was described according to the Australian Soil and Land 
Survey Field Handbook (The National Committee on Soil and Water 2009) vegetation 
classification system (Appendix F) and National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) level 
5: association level. At this level, up to three dominant genera for each of the upper, mid 
and ground strata are categorised based on dominant growth form, cover and height 
(DSEWPC 2003). 

 
Vegetation condition – vegetation was described according to Keighery (1994) (Appendix F). 

 
Photographs – a photograph of the vegetation was taken from the north-west corner of 
each quadrat. 
The size of quadrats and information collected addresses requirements of the DEC’s “Recommended 
Interim  Protocol  for  Flora  Surveys  of  Banded  Iron  Formations  (BIF)  of  the  Yilgarn  Craton”  (CALM 
2007). 
2.2.2
 
Classification of Astron Quadrats  
Vegetation was mapped at community level and is based on floristics and land systems as per EPA 
Guidance Statement No. 51 (EPA 2004). Quadrats were classified by creating a dendrogram based on 
Sorensen’s index of similarity (equivalent to Bray-Curtis index, with species presence-absence data 
only (Magurran 2004)). The dendrogram was created using the Group Average Method (‘UPGMA’), 
implemented  in  Primer  v6  (Clarke  and  Gorley  2006).  Primer  also  allowed  for  the  objective 
classification  of  quadrats  into  statistically  significant  clusters  using  the  SimProf  test  (Clarke  et  al. 
2008). Quadrats were then mapped, including the classification derived from the SimProf results and 
overlaid with the FCTs (Woodman 2012). 
2.2.3
 
Vegetation Description Mapping 
Using a combination of data from quadrats, mapping notes and opportunistic collections, a species 
list  was  developed  for  the  survey  area.  This  list  is  also  expressed  as  a  species  by  FCT  matrix.  A 
floristic  assessment  has  previously  been  conducted  and  used  to  define  and  map  FCTs  across  the 
broader  region  (Woodman  2012).  An  A3  colour  aerial  photograph  at  1:10,000  scale  with  the  FCT 
mapping  marked,  and  a  handheld  computer  device  (Trimble)  with  Geographic  Positioning  System 
(GPS) and ArcPad Geographic Information System with the survey area uploaded were used in the 
field to ground-truth and verify the mapping boundaries. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 13 
To  verify  FCTs  from  (Woodman  2012)  regional  mapping,  an  independent  method  was  used  to 
develop maps. Vegetation maps were  created by integrating a number of elements in hierarchical 
order:    1)  land  system  mapping  by  Payne  et  al.  (1998)  based  on  topography  and  substrate;  2) 
similarity  of  species  profile  (presence-absence)  of  Astron  quadrats;  3)  the  presence-absence  of 
Eucalyptus species (spp.); and 4) habit of Eucalyptus spp. (i.e. tree (Eucalyptus loxophleba) or mallee 
(E.  kochii,  E.  brachycorys,  E.  celastroides,  E.  leptopoda).  Further,  information  on  boundaries  came 
from satellite imagery (2006) and 114 geo-referenced mapping notes (see Appendix G for locations). 
Each  mapping  note  recorded  dominant  species  in  tree  and  shrub  layer,  substrate  and  disturbance 
history (grazing or fire). 
A key question is to determine if the vegetation on the low banded ironstone range running north 
east through the survey area could be identified as one of the PECs found on similar geology in the 
region.  Using  the  same  methodology  outlined  in  section  2.2.2,  species  similarity  of  the  three 
identified  PECs  (Blue  Hills  (Mount  Karara/Mungada  Ridge/Blue  Hills),  Minjar/Gnows  Nest  and 
Warriedar  Hills/Pinyalling  (downloaded  from  DEC’s  NatureMap  2013))  was  compared  with  the 
survey  area.  Quadrats  from  PECs  were  compared  with  the  fifteen  from  this  survey  and  five  from 
Woodman (2007). 
2.2.4
 
  Targeted Survey 
Using the list of conservation significant species compiled from the literature review and database 
search and FloraBase (WA Herbarium 2012), a booklet containing photographs, habitat information 
and  taxonomic  features  for  each  species  was  compiled  for  use  in  the  field.  Botanists  familiarised 
themselves with all these species at the WA Herbarium before going into the field. 
Although guidance is not explicit (EPA 2004), regulators need to know which threatened or priority 
species  are  present,  their  distribution  over  the  survey  area  and  an  estimation  of  the  number  of 
individuals.  
In order to get total coverage of the 761.9 ha survey area, a grid of parallel south-east to north-west 
lines  100  m  apart  was  superimposed  over  the  survey  area  and  uploaded  as  a  shape  file  to  the 
Trimble units. Additionally, traverses on foot were made up and down all existing drill lines and pads 
and  opportunistic  records  of  priority  flora  and  weeds  were  also  made  when  walking  to  quadrat 
locations (Appendix G). In the proposed pit area the lines were reduced to approximately 50 m apart 
and were undertaken parallel to the ridge (i.e. south west to north east) to enhance the probability 
of finding all populations (Appendix G). It was calculated that at least 156 km was traversed on the 
survey area. 
Red-and-white  striped  flagging  tape  was  used  to  mark  threatened  and  priority  P1  and  P2  flora. 
Where large populations of these species were encountered, record points were collected across a 
representative  area  of  the  population.  Specimens  of  each  priority  flora  species  were  collected  for 
verification and lodgment at the WA Herbarium as per flora licensing requirements. 
2.2.5
 
Mapping and Density Estimates of Priority Flora 
Our estimates of plant  densities  were  adjusted to account  for a decline  in plant  detectability with 
distance  from  the  transect.  Hence,  observed  densities  were  multiplied  by  this  factor  in  order  to 
derive an estimated  density  of individuals per hectare.  This information was  visualised  by creating 
coloured density kernels in which the density of plants (plants per ha) was estimated for each 10 m x 
10  m  cell  of  the  landscape.  The  result  is  a  “smoothing”  of  values  between  recorded  points.  This 
estimation was performed using the “Density” function within ArcGIS 9.3’s Spatial Analyst.  

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 14 
Probability of occurrence within an FCT was calculated first by overlaying priority flora locations on 
modified FCTs to get presence/absence. When taxa were present in the FCT, mean density of taxa 
within each FCT was calculated by dividing total abundance by total area (ha) of FCT. This number 
was used to estimate probability of occurrence (<1 low, 1-5 Medium, 5-20 high, >20 very high). 
2.2.6
 
Specimen Identification and Data Entry 
Plant  specimens  not  able  to  be  positively  identified  in  the  field  were  collected,  given  a  unique 
collection number and pressed. Specimens were air-dried and identified by Astron botanists Vanessa 
Clarke,  Raimond  Orifici,  Janelle  Atkinson,  Alice  Bott  and  Jessie-Leigh  Brown.  Specimens  were 
identified to the fullest possible classification (i.e. species, subspecies or variant) dependant on the 
availability of the vegetative and reproductive parts.   
Data from each quadrat were entered into a customised Access database. Data entry was completed 
by Astron Botanist Natalie Krawczyk and Graduate Scientist Blake Wood. Due to the names of some 
taxa  having  been  recently  revised,  scientific  names  assigned  were  updated  to  reflect  current 
nomenclature (Western Australian Herbarium 2012). 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 15 
3
 
Results 
3.1
 
Desktop Assessment 
3.1.1
 
Database Search Results 
No  TECs  listed  under  the  EPBC  Act  have  been  recorded  within  a  10  km  radius  of  the  survey  area 
(DSEWPC 2012c). Similarly, no vegetation based TECs or PECs listed on the DEC for the Murchison 
Bioregion were found within the survey area (DEC 2012a).  
Three  terrestrial  vegetation  PECs  are  listed  as  occurring  within  50  km  of  the  survey  area  (DEC 
2012a): 

 
Blue Hills (Mount Karara/Mungada Ridge/Blue Hills) vegetation complexes (banded 
ironstone formation)’. This PEC is regionally restricted and is only found on the Blue Hills 
Range (P1) 

 
Minjar/Gnows Nest vegetation complexes (banded iron formation) (P1) 

 
Warriedar Hills/Pinyalling vegetation complexes (banded iron formation) (P1).  
Five  Declared  Rare  Flora  (DRF)  species,  Acacia  woodmaniorum,  Eremophila  viscida,  Eucalyptus 
synandra, Hybanthus cymulosus and Stylidium scintillans, have been previously recorded within 20 
km of the survey area (DEC 2012b; DEC 2012c; DEC 2012d; DEC 2012e). 
Forty-seven  priority  flora  species  have  been  identified  by  the  DEC  database  searches  as  occurring 
within  50  km  of  the  survey  area  (Appendix  H).  Of  these,  10  are  priority  one  (P1)  species,  five  are 
priority two (P2), 25 are priority three (P3) and two are priority four (P4) species (Table 4). Based on 
habitat  preferences  and previously  recorded proximity to the survey area, combined with the FCT 
soil  descriptions  from  previous  mapping  and  aerial  photograph  interpretation  of  landforms  within 
the survey area, 19 of the listed priority flora species are considered to have the potential to occur 
(Western Australian Herbarium 2012). Six of these species have previously been recorded within the 
survey  area  (Woodman  2012;  Table  4).  One P3  species,  Melaleuca  barlowii, was  not  identified  on 
DEC  database  searches  (DEC  2012a,  2012c;  DEC  2012d;  DEC  2012e)  or  the  EPBC  Act  Protected 
Matters  Search  (DSEWPC 2012c),  but  has  previously  been  recorded  in  the  survey  area  (Woodman 
2012). 
All database search results are provided in Appendix E.  
 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 16 
3.1.2
 
Literature Review 
The results of previous reports were compared with the current survey (Table 4). The Yalgoo region has a high vascular plant biodiversity. As expected the 
number  of species  increases  with  area  surveyed.  Areas  with  greater topographic  and  substrate  diversity  such  as  Blue  Hills  had  corresponding  increased 
levels of plant diversity.  
Table 4: Summary of comparative literature review in the Yalgoo region. 
Author (year)/Project Area 
Size (ha) and location  
Number of sample sites & 
species 
Seasonal 
conditions 
TECs and PECs 
recorded 
Priority flora recorded 
This survey 
761 ha 
24 quadrats, 172 species 
Poor 
None recorded. 
8 (including 4 sterile 
specimens) 
Astron 2012a, Expansion 
340. 7 ha 
13 quadrats and nine 
relevés, 167 species 
Good 
No TEC, but one PEC 
(Blue Hills) adjacent 
to the survey area. 

Astron 2012b, Mungada Ridge 
306 ha 
27 quadrats and seven 
relevés, 166 species 
Good 
No TEC, but one PEC 
(Blue Hills) adjacent 
to the survey area. 

Bennett Environmental 
Consulting, 2004, Blue Hills 
 
Size not reported. Blue Hills. 
29 quadrats, 13 relevé.  
211 species.  
Average 
None recorded.  
3 (including 1 sterile 
specimen) 
Botanica, 2011, Jasper Hill and 
Hinge 
 
4.9 ha. 79.4 km SSE of Yalgoo. 
Level 1 survey, no quadrats 
or relevés. 
115 species.  
Excellent 
None recorded. 

Botanica, 2012, Shine 
646 ha. 69 km SE of Yalgoo. 
28 quadrats. 148 species.  
Excellent 
None recorded. 
3 
Paul Armstrong and Associates
2003, Perenjori to Mt Gibson  
 
85 km long haul road. 
Perenjori to Mount Gibson.  
Number of sites not 
reported. 354 species.  
Average 
None recorded.  

Woodman Environmental 
Consulting, 2007, Mungada Ridge  
Karara – Mungada, 60 km NE 
of Perenjori.  
156 quadrats. 509 species + 
Poor 
None recorded.  
21  
Woodman 2012, Regional 
Mapping+ 
Regional mapping (more than 
75,000 ha) 
990 quadrats. 640 species 
Mixed 
None recorded 
35 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 17 
Author (year)/Project Area 
Size (ha) and location  
Number of sample sites & 
species 
Seasonal 
conditions 
TECs and PECs 
recorded 
Priority flora recorded 
Markey, A.S., and Dillon, S. J. 
2008a, Yalgoo Region - Yalgoo 
Yalgoo area – Gnows Nest 
Range, Wolla Wolla and 
Woolgah-Wadgingarra hills. 
55 quadrats, 243 species 
Mixed 
None recorded 

Markey, A.S., and Dillon, S. J. 
2008a, Yalgoo Bioregion - 
Tallering 
Yalgoo bioregion – Tallering 
Landsystem 
103 quadrats, 414 species 
Mixed 
None recorded 
15 
+ includes the combined results of Markey and Dillon (2006), Markey and Dillon (2008a), and Markey and Dillon (2008b)

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 18 
3.1.2.1
 
‘At Risk’ Ecosystems 
Desmond and Chant (2001) listed 12 ecosystems characterised by flora or vegetation traits as being 
‘at risk’ in the Yalgoo subregion. Based on the defining land systems, habitats and/or soils of these 
ecosystems, it is considered unlikely that any of these would occur in the survey area.  
3.1.2.2
 
Reservation Priority 
Desmond  and  Chant  (2001)  listed  83  pre-European  (Beard  1976)  vegetation  units  in  the  Yalgoo 
subregion  as  being  of  priority  for  reservation  in  the  conservation  estate.  Of  these  vegetation 
associations,  51  were  rated  as  high  priority,  10  of  medium  priority  and  22  of  low  priority  for 
reservation. Vegetation unit 420 (Beard 1976), which covers the whole of the survey area, has a high 
reservation priority. 
3.2
 
Vegetation and Flora Survey 
3.2.1
 
Field Survey 
Using a combination of data from quadrats, mapping notes and opportunistic collections, a species 
list  was  developed  for  the  survey  area.  Combining  data  from  quadrats,  vegetation  mapping  and 
opportunistic collections, 172 taxa from 46 families were found with the most diverse families being 
Asteraceae,  Fabaceae,  Myrtaceae  and  Proteaceae  (Appendix  I).  A  species  list  has  also  been 
presented in a modified FCT  by  species matrix  (Appendix J).  Dry conditions meant many perennial 
taxa were not flowering and annual taxa had died resulting in almost 25% of the collected taxa not 
being  able  to  be  fully  confirmed.  All  of  the  taxa  recorded  have  been  previously  recorded  in  the 
broader area. Due to the inability to fully identify a number of the plant collections, the species list is 
representative of the regional flora but is restricted in the total number of taxa presented. 
Raw  data  from  the  24  quadrats  is  presented  in  Appendix  K.  A  statistical  classification  of  quadrats 
based on vegetation composition is presented in Appendix L and Figure 3. This classification is then 
used to support the vegetation mapping. 
3.2.2
 
Vegetation Mapping 
A mapping stratification process was applied to the survey area using a combination of information 
from the aerial photography, land system mapping, quadrats, and the presence/absence of mallees 
or  trees.  The  resultant  map  showed  good  fidelity  with  the  previous  mapping  (Woodman  2012) 
although  only five  FCTs were mapped  compared to the previous  (Woodman 2012)  nine. The  main 
reason for this divergence was that FCT 18 was actually a fire scar across a number of mapping units 
and  was  dissolved.  Appendix  M  maps  the  fire  scar  over  the  survey  area.  Floristic  composition  of 
Astron quadrats were classified using Sorensen’s index of similarity. Quadrats with a similar species 
composition have the same colour (Figure 3).  FCTs 9, 17 and some of 18 were amalgamated to FCT 
9 because they were floristically similar. Similarly, FCTs 2, 10 and 26 were amalgamated to become 
FCT 2. Although FCT 13 was also found to be floristically similar to this second group (FCT 2), FCT 2 is 
unique from FCT 13 because of the absence of Eucalyptus species. Table 5 and Figure 3 shows these 
changes and gives a summary of substrate and dominant species defining these modified FCTs based 
on  data  from  the  Astron  survey  area.  Plant  species  composition  on  the  low  banded  ironstone 
formation on the survey area (quadrats from modified FCT 2 and 13) and the  three adjacent PECs 
(Blue  Hills  (Mount  Karara/Mungada  Ridge/Blue  Hills),  Minjar/Gnows  Nest  and  Warriedar 
Hills/Pinyalling) were highly dissimilar (see dendrograms and cluster diagrams in Appendix L). 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə