Astron Environmental Services



Yüklə 19,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü19,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

486000
487000
488000
489000
67
86
00
0
67
87
00
0
67
88
00
0
67
89
00
0
67
90
00
0
±
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
Metres
Figure 4: Priority Flora Locations
Author: M. Gardener
Date: 12-12-2012
Datum:  GDA 1994  -  Projection:  MGA Zone 50  -  Scale: 1:15,000 (A3)
Drawn: C. Dyde
Figure Ref: 16002-12FMV1RevA_20121212_Fig04_PriFlora
Karara Mining Ltd.
Hinge Vegetation and Flora Survey
Legend
Hinge Survey Area
Tracks
Priority Flora
Species
G
F
Dicrastylis ? linearifolia (sterile) (P3)
!
(
Drummondita fulva (P3)
G
F
Grevillea ? globosa (sterile) (P3)
G
F
Melaleuca ? barlowii (sterile) (P3)
#
*
Micromyrtus trudgenii (P3)
#
*
Persoonia pentasticha (P3)
!
H
Prostanthera ? sp. Karara (sterile) (P1)
!
H
Psammomoya implexa (P3)
Modified Vegetation Mapping
- Floristic Community Type -
2
9
13
19a
32
G
F

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 26 
This page has been left blank intentionally. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 27 
Table 7: Probability of priority flora occurring in each of the FCTs
#

Taxa 
FCT 2 
FCT 9 
FCT 13 
FCT 19a 
FCT 32 
Prostanthera sp. Karara (D. 
Coultas & K. Greenacre Opp 8) 
(P1) 
Low 
Medium 
Medium 
Low 
Low 
Dicrastylis linearifolia(P3) 

Medium 



Drummondita fulva (P3) 
High 
Low 
High 
Low 

Grevillea globosa (P3) 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 

Melaleuca barlowii (P3) 
Low 




Micromyrtus trudgenii (P3) 
Medium 




Persoonia pentasticha (P3) 
Low 

Low 
Low 

Psammomoya implexa (P3) 

Very High 
Medium 
Medium 


Probability based on average number of individuals per ha of FCT (<1 low, 1-5 Medium, 5-20 high, >20 very 
high). 
3.2.5
 
Introduced Flora 
No  Declared  Plants  were  found  in  the  survey  area.  Five  species  of  introduced  plants  were  found 
within  the  survey  area,  all  of  them  being  annual  herbs  (Table  8).  These  included  *Brassica 
tournefortii,  *Cuscuta  epithymum,  *Erodium  aureum,  *Mesembryanthemum  nodiflorum  and 
*Wahlenbergia capensis. *Mesembryanthemum nodiflorum is rated to have a high ecological impact 
(DEC  2011)  and  although  unknown,  *Cuscuta  epithymum  is  likely  to  have  an  impact  because  it 
parasitises  annual herbs.  Introduced flora  coordinates  are given in  Appendix  P  and are  mapped in 
Appendix Q. Details of the IPP process is presented in Appendix D, Table D. 2. 
Table 8: Introduced flora species recorded in the survey area. 
Species (common name) 
Family 
Number of 
individuals 
Floristic 
Community 
Types 
Ecological impact 
(Low, Moderate, 
High, Unknown)  
*Brassica tournefortii 
(Mediterranean turnip) 
BRASSICACEAE 


Limited 
*Cuscuta epithymum (lesser 
dodder) 
CONVOLVULACEAE  +^ 
2, 19a and 32 
Unknown 
*Erodium aureum 
GERANIACEAE 


Limited 
*?Mesembryanthemum 
nodiflorum (slender ice plant) 
AIZOACEAE  
+^ 

High 
*Wahlenbergia capensis (cape 
bluebell) 
CAMPANULACEAE 


Limited 
^ Species were recorded in quadrats as a cover (%), not as individuals.  
? Specimens were sterile, hence full identification is queried. 
 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 28 
4
 
Discussion 
Within  the  761.9  ha  survey  area,  a  total of  vascular plant  172  taxa were  recorded,  of which  eight 
were priority flora and five were introduced. The vegetation  condition in the survey was mostly in 
‘very  good’  and  a  few  areas  in  ‘excellent’  (Keighery  1994).    Poorer  vegetation  conditions  were 
recorded  in  quadrats  where  a  fire  had  passed  in  the  previous  10  years,  and  those  that  had  been 
impacted by grazing. Lochada Station was used for sheep grazing for approximately 100 years and 
areas  of  better  soil  (for  example  FCT  19a)  with  palatable  grasses  (Austrostipa  elegantissima)  and 
chenopods  have  been  heavily  impacted.  These  values  for  vascular  plant  diversity  and  vegetation 
condition  are  comparable  to  other  flora  surveys  undertaken  in  the  region  of  similar  size  and 
substrate (see Table 4). The EPA (2004) lists a number of possible limitations that may impinge on 
the adequacy of a vegetation and flora survey. These have been addressed in relation to the current 
survey in Appendix R. The main limitation of this study was that seasonal conditions were poor and 
the survey was undertaken in late spring, which resulted in the identity of many perennial specimens 
not being resolved due to lack of flowers or fruit; and a reduction in number of annual species being 
recorded. 
Historically, Aboriginal people used fire to create a mosaic of small burnt patches of vegetation at 
different stages of post-fire succession across the landscape (Burrows et al. 2004). However, when 
land  use  changed  to  pastoralism  in  the  late  19
th
  century,  fire  was  largely  excluded  from  this 
environment. As well as the fire that occurred in the last 10 years, evidence exists on the survey area 
(such  as  charcoal  remains)  that  there  have  been  other  fires  in  the  last  30  years,  although  grazing 
often removes the fuel load and hence suppresses fire. A good indicator of time since last fire, is the 
size of the widespread white cypress pine (Callitris columellaris), which is killed by fire and regrows 
only from seed. It appears the fire mosaic within the survey area has not been sufficiently frequent 
to  impact  white  cypress  pine  recruitment.  Other  indicators  of  ecosystem  condition,  such  as  the 
presence  of  the  mallee  fowl  and  the  western  spiny-tailed  skink  (Mike  Bamford  pers.  comm. 
September 2012) show the system is healthy. 
Like  any  theoretical  model,  vegetation  maps  are  only  a  two  dimensional  approximation  of  a 
landscape that is shaped by physical and biological factors. Whilst they cannot capture all variation, 
their  simplified  representations  can  assist  in  management  decisions  and  communication.  Using  a 
hierarchical approach to classification, a total of five FCTs were described on the survey area. These 
were  broadly  overlapping  with  the  nine  FCTs  previously  mapped  on  the  survey  area  (Woodman 
2012).  The  main  reason  for  this  divergence  of  results  was  the  differing  scales,  moving  from  a 
regionally  based  survey  to  a  site  specific,  local  survey  over  the  Hinge  project  area.  Furthermore, 
Woodman (2012) mapped a fire scar, which crossed a number of FCTs adding a complexity that did 
not exist. An analysis of Astron quadrats showed that KH01, KH02, KH07, KH20, KH21 are floristically 
similar and therefore do not warrant separation. Even though the quadrats occur in three different 
FCTs, they share species suited to post-fire succession. 
Another issue was matching the dominant species defining the Woodman (2012) FCTs with Astron’s 
FCTs  (Table  5).  Woodman’s  descriptions  were  based on  990  quadrats  at  a  regional  scale,  whereas 
this study used 24 quadrats on a local scale. This was addressed by modifying the description to only 
include  dominant  species  found  in  Astron  quadrats.  Key  species  such  as  Philotheca  deserti  subsp. 
deserti  (Woodman  FCT  18)  and  Acacia  umbraculiformis  (Woodman  FCT  32)  were  not  found.  An 
explanation  for  this  could be  the  differing  scales  of  survey  both  spatially  and  temporally;  that  the 
quadrats  did  not  capture  some  species;  and  the  difficulties  associated  with  identifying  sterile 
specimens. An example of this is FCT 19a where a number of chenopods could not be identified past 
genus. These probably coincide with Woodman (2012) dominant species such as Maireana carnosa 
and  Enchylaena  tomentosa  var.  tomentosa.  Additionally,  Rhagodia  drummondii,  Sclerolaena 
diacanthaSclerolaena fusiformis should have been recorded, but were not detected or able to be 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 29 
identified  from  material  collected  for  this  survey.  Conversely,  sometimes  key species  in  this  study 
descriptions were absent in Woodman (2012) descriptions. For example, FCT 32 on the eastern side 
of survey site had the tree Allocasuarina campestris as a dominant. 
Our  approach  to  mapping  the  survey  area  was  to  use  land  system  as  a  base  layer  (topography: 
crests,  slopes,  low  rises  and  flats;  and  substrate:  rocky  outcrops;  gravel  cover  and  soil  type). 
Secondly,  similarity  of  species  presence  within  Astron  quadrats  were  used  to  simplify  previously 
defined and mapped FCTs. For example: four FCTs (2, 10, 26 and some of 18) were amalgamated to 
become  FCT  2  because  the  floristic  analysis  showed  they  were  statistically  similar.  Thirdly,  the 
presence-absence  of  Eucalyptus  spp.  was  used  to  separate  FCT  2  and  FCT  32  out  from  the  other 
FCTs. Furthermore, this helped redefine the line between FCT 2 and FCT 13. Finally, the habit of the 
dominant Eucalyptus spp. was used to divide FCT 9 and 13 (mallees) and 19a (tree- E. loxophleba). A 
simple key to identify the five modified FCTs in the survey area is provided (Figure 5). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 5: Simple key to identify the five modified FCTs in the survey area. 
At  the  highest  level,  land  system  mapping  (Payne  et  al.  1998)  identifies  some  Tallering  banded 
ironstone formation in the survey area. The analysis showed plant species on banded ironstone on 
the  survey  area  was  highly  dissimilar  to  three  adjacent  PECs  (Blue  Hills  (Mount  Karara/Mungada 
Ridge/Blue  Hills),  Minjar/Gnows  Nest  and  Warriedar  Hills/Pinyalling).  Whilst  banded  ironstone 
communities  across  the  region  had  a  number  of  species  in  common  such  as  Acacia  ramulosa  var. 
ramulosa,  Acacia  acuminata,  Acacia  sibina,  Aluta  aspera  subsp.  hesperia  and  Philotheca  sericea, 
species  diversity,  particularly  of  the  threatened  and  priority  species,  was  lower  compared  to  the 
PECs.  The  banded  ironstone  range  on  the  survey  area  was  far  lower  (about  40  m  above  the 
surrounding  plain)  with  little  outcropping  and  had  gentle  slopes,  which  may explain  differences  in 
species  composition.  Better  seasonal  conditions  during  surveys  can  result  in  greater  species 
numbers  which  could  skew  data.  This  could  explain  the  slight  dissimilarly  between  Astron  and 
Woodman quadrats but not the high dissimilarity between the survey area and the PECs.   
 
Ridges, slopes 
and rises (high 
gravel cover) 
Flats, clay and 
sand (sparse 
gravel cover) 
No Eucalypts 
Ridges and 
slopes 
Mallee Eucalypts 
present   
FCT 9 
Lower 
Slopes 
Mallee Eucalypts 
present   
FCT 13 
Eucalyptus 
loxophleba 
FCT 19 
Alluvial flats 
(clay) 
Acacia spp.  
FCT 2 
Eucalypts 
Low rises 
Allocasuarina 
campestris 
FCT 32 
Sand plain 
(sand) 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 30 
In  this  survey,  eight  species  of  priority  flora  were  found  –  all  were  perennial  shrubs.  Four  of  the 
species were unable to be confirmed because of sterile material. Two new species were found in the 
survey area (Grevillea globosa and Persoonia pentasticha); based on previous reports (Appendix N) it 
is not surprising they are present in the survey area.  
A  new  approach  in  this  report  is  the  visualisation  of  priority  flora  densities  and  probability  of 
occurrence in FCTs. These tools have potential application in management and communication. For 
example, if new disturbance was planned within the survey area, impacts on priority flora could be 
predicted with a high level of certainty. The only caveat to this method is that the estimate of total 
abundance  used  to  calculate  densities  could  be  an  underestimate.  This  is  because  in  dense 
vegetation (e.g. FCT 2), vision was often restricted to less than 25 m, and hence the doubling of the 
observed abundance to give total abundance is indicative only. 
To  date,  the  survey  area  has  a  negligible  weed  component.  Five  introduced  species  were  found 
within  the  survey  area,  all  of  them  being  annual  and  at  very  low  densities.  *Mesembryanthemum 
nodiflorum is rated to have a high ecological impact (DEC 2011) but as only a single plant was found 
and that it is at the edge of its climatic distribution, suggests its potential impact is more likely to be 
low or moderate. *Cuscuta epithymum  was only  found at a few locations in this survey but  this is 
likely  the  result  of  poor  seasonal  conditions  and  the  late  survey.  However,  surveys  nearby  at 
Mungada  Ridge  and  Expansion  (Astron  2012a,  2012b)  found  it  to  be  widespread.  The  ecological 
impact  of  it  is  unknown,  but  as  it  is  a  root  parasite  on  small  annuals  there  is  some  potential  for 
impact.  The  invasion  of  alien  plant  species  is  widely  accepted  to  alter  ecosystem  structure  and 
function,  community  composition,  and  species  interactions  but  surprisingly  little  data  conclusively 
demonstrates this (Gurevitch and Padilla 2004). 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 31 
5
 
References 
Astron Environmental Services, 2012a, ‘Karara Expansion vegetation and flora survey’, unpublished 
report to Karara Mining Limited. 
Astron Environmental Services, 2012b, ‘Karara Mungada Ridge vegetation and flora survey’
unpublished report to Karara Mining Limited. 
Beard, JS, 1976, Vegetation Survey of Western AustraliaSheet 6, Murchison 1:1,000,000 Vegetation 
Series, Map and Explanatory Notes, University of Western Australia, Perth.  
Bennett Environmental Consulting, 2004, ‘Flora and Vegetation Blue Hills’, unpublished report to 
ATA Environmental. 
Botanica, 2011, ‘Level 1 Flora and Vegetation Survey for the Jasper Hill and Hinge’, unpublished 
report to Karara Mining Limited. 
Botanica, 2012, ‘Level 2 Flora and Vegetation Survey and Priority Flora Search of the Shine Project’
unpublished report to Karara Mining Ltd. 
Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), 2012, Climate Averages for Morawa, viewed 4 September 2012, 
www.bom.gov.au

Burrows, ND, Burbidge, AA, Fuller, PJ, 2004, Integrating indigenous knowledge of wildland fire and 
western technology to conserve biodiversity in an Australian desert, viewed December 
2012,http://www.maweb.org/documents/bridging/papers/burrows.neil.pdf. 
Christian, CS and Stewart, GA, 1953, General Report on Survey of Katherine-Darwin Region 1946, 
CSIRO Land Research Series No. 1. 
Clarke, KR, Gorley, RN, 2006, PRIMER v6: User Manual/Tutorial. PRIMER-E, Plymouth. 
Clarke, KR, Somerfield PJ, Gorley RN, 2008, Testing of null hypotheses in exploratory community 
analyses: similarity profiles and biota-environment linkage. Journal of Experimental Marine 
Biology and Ecology , 366: 56-69. 
Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM), 1999, Environmental Weed Strategy
Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth. 
 CALM, 2002, A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002, 
Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth. 
CALM, 2007, Recommended Interim Protocol for Flora Surveys of Banded Ironstone Formations (BIF) 
of the Yilgarn Craton, DEC, South Perth. 
Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC), 2011, Invasive Plant Prioritization Process for 
DEC, viewed October 2012, 
http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view /6295/2275/1/1/.
 
DEC, 2012a, Threatened Ecological Communities and Priority Ecological Communities Database 
search results, Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth.  
DEC, 2012b, Threatened (Declared Rare) and Priority Flora Database search results, Department of 
Environment and Conservation, Perth.  

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 32 
DEC, 2012c, Threatened and Priority Flora List Database search results, Department of Environment 
and Conservation, Perth. 
DEC, 2012d, Western Australian Herbarium Specimen Database search results, Department of 
Environment and Conservation, Perth.  
DEC, 2012e, NatureMap Species Report, created 12 October 2012, Department of Environment and 
Conservation, Perth.  
DEC, 2013, NatureMap: Flora Surveys of the Yilgarn (BIF, Greenstone and Calcrete), viewed May 
2013, 
http://naturemap.dec.wa.gov.au/default.aspx
 
Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPC), 2003, 
Australian Vegetation Attribute Manual National Vegetation Information SystemVersion 
6.0, viewed October 2012, 
http://www.environment.gov.au/erin/nvis/publications/avam/section-2-1.html#hierarchy.
 
DSEWPC, 2009, Biodiversity Assessment – Yalgoo, viewed 26 September 2012, 
http://www.anra.gov.au/topics/vegetation/assessment/wa/ibra-yalgoo.html.
 
DSEWPC, 2012a, Australia’s Bioregions (IBRA), viewed 24 September 2012, 
http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/nrs/science/bioregion-framework/ibra/index.html.
 
DSEWPC, 2012b, Discover Information Geographically, viewed October 2012, 
http://www.environment.gov.au/metadataexplorer/explorer.jsp.
 
DSEWPC, 2012c, EPBC Act Protected Matters Search Tool results, Department of Sustainability, 
Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Canberra. 
Desmond, A and Chant, A, 2001, Yalgoo (Yal). A Biodiversity Summary of Western Australia’s 53 
Biogeographic Subregions in 2002, Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth.  
Environment Australia, 2000, Revision of the Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia 
(IBRA) and development of Version 5.1, Summary Report, Department of Environment and 
Heritage, Canberra. 
EPA, 2002, Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an element of Biodiversity Protection, Position Statement 
3, Environmental Protection Authority, Perth.  
EPA, 2004, Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental Impact Assessment in Western 
Australia, Guidance Statement 51, Environmental Protection Authority, Perth. 
Gindalbie Metals Limited (GML), 2007, Public Environmental Review, Karara Management Services 
Pty Ltd, Mungada Ridge Hematite Project, Prepared by Enesar, Perth.  
Gurevitch J, Padilla DK, (2004), Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions? Trends in Ecology & 
Evolution 19: 470–474. 
Keighery, BJ, 1994, Bushland Plant Survey, A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community
Wildflower Society of WA (Inc.), Nedlands. 
Lane, P, 2004, Geology of Western Australia’s National Parks, Peter Lane, Perth. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 33 
Magurran, AE 2004 Measuring Biological Diversity. Blackwell Publishing.  Malden USA 256 pp. 
Markey, AS and Dillon, SJ, 2006, Flora and vegetation of the banded iron formation of the Yilgarn 
Craton: the central Tallering Land System, Unpublished report (draft), Department of 
Environment and Conservation, Perth.  
Markey, AS and Dillon, SJ, 2008a, Flora and vegetation of the banded iron formation of the Yilgarn 
Craton: Yalgoo, Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth.  
Markey, AS and Dillon, SJ, 2008b, Flora and vegetation of the banded iron formation of the Yilgarn 
Craton: the central Tallering Land System, Department of Environment and Conservation, 
Perth.  
The National Committee on Soil and Water, 2009, Australian Soil and Land Survey Field Handbook, 
3
rd
 Edition, CSIRO, Melbourne.  
Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council (NRMMC), 2007, The Australian Weeds Strategy, 
A national Strategy for weed management in Australia, Department of the Environment 
and Water Resources, Canberra. 
Paul Armstrong and Associates, 2003, ‘Vegetation Assessment and Rare Flora Search between 
Perenjori and Mt Gibson’, unpublished report to Mount Gibson Iron Limited.  
Payne, AL, Van Vreeswyk, AME, Pringle, HJR, Leighon, KA and Hennig, P, 1998, An inventory and 
condition survey of the Sandstone-Yalgoo-Paynes Find area, Western Australia, Technical 
Bulletin 90, Department of Agriculture and Food, Perth.  
Shepherd, DP, Beeston, GR and Hopkins, AJM, 2002, Native vegetation in Western Australia
Technical Report 249, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia.  
Thackway, R and Cresswell, ID, 1995, An Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia: a 
framework for establishing the national system of reservesVersion 4.0 Canberra: 
Australian Nature Conservation Agency. 
Western Australian Herbarium, 2012, FloraBase – the Western Australian Flora, viewed October 
2012, 
http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au.
 
Woodman Environmental Consulting (Woodman), 2007, ‘Karara-Mungada Project Survey Area Flora 
and Vegetation’, unpublished report prepared for Gindalbie Metals Limited. 
Woodman, 2012, ‘Regional Flora and Vegetation Survey of the Karara to Minjar Block’, unpublished 
report to Karara Mining Ltd.

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Page | 34 
This page has been left blank intentionally. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə