Astron Environmental Services



Yüklə 19,8 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü19,8 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

Appendix A:
 
Pre-Land Systems 
Summary and Mapping

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally.

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Table A. 1: Land systems within the survey area (Van Vreeswyk et al. 1998).  
Land system 
Landforms 
Soils 
Vegetation 
Euchre (low granite 
breakaways with 
alluvial plains and 
sandy tracts 
supporting eucalypt 
woodlands and 
acacia shrublands). 
Breakaways 
Very shallow coarse 
red clayey sands on 
granite on plateau; 
stony soils or shallow 
duplex on granite on 
upper footslopes. 
Very scattered to scattered mixed 
low shrubland. Dominant low 
shrubs include Thryptomene, 
Eriostemon and Mirbelia spp. on 
plateau; very scattered low 
shrublands on upper footslopes. 
Lower footslopes 
Shallow duplex or 
shallow red earths on 
granite. 
Scattered Eucalyptus loxophleba 
woodland with low halophytic 
understoreys and scattered low 
halophytic shrublands occasionally 
dominated by Atriplex vesicaria
Sandplains/gravelly 
sandplains 
Deep red or yellow 
clayey sands on 
gravel. 
Moderately close Acacia spp. tall 
shrublands. 
Stony plains 
Shallow red clayey 
sands on granite. 
Very variable, moderately close tall 
shrublands with acacias, E. 
loxophleba and halophytic and 
non-halophytic undershrubs. 
Gritty-surfaced plains 
Shallow coarse red 
clayey sands on 
granite. 
Scattered Acacia quadrimarginea 
tall shrubland. 
Loamy plains 
Shallow red earths or 
shallow red clayey 
sands on hardpan or 
deep red earths. 
Scattered to moderately close 
eucalypt woodland with acacia tall 
shrubs and Amphipogon spp. or 
Monachather paradoxus perennial 
grasses. 
Alluvial plains 
Shallow duplex or red 
earths on granite or 
deep duplex. 
Scattered to moderately close 
eucalypt woodland with 3 
halophytic undershrubs, 
sometimes with Atriplex spp. 
dominant. 
Drainage lines (19a)* 
Shallow duplex on 
granite and shallow 
red clayey sands. 
Very variable vegetation, some 
have moderately close E. 
loxophleba woodland with Atriplex 
undershrubs. 
Joseph (undulating 
yellow sandplain 
supporting dense 
mixed shrublands 
with patchy 
mallees). 
Gravelly sand sheets 
Yellow clayey sands 
on ironstone gravel at 
variable depth. 
Close mixed shrublands commonly 
with Acacia, Melaleuca and 
Allocasuarina spp. mid and tall 
shrubs, and low heath shrubs or 
moderately close to close acacia 
tall shrublands with an 
Amphipogon caricinus layer. 
Sand sheets (9)* 
Deep yellow and red 
clayey sands. 
Close to closed mixed shrublands 
commonly with acacia and 
melaleuca tall shrubs and low 
heath shrubs such as Eriostemon 
and Thryptomene sp. or 
moderately close to close acacia 
tall shrubland. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Land system 
Landforms 
Soils 
Vegetation 
Loamy plains 
Variable shallow red 
clayey sands on 
granite, sandy red 
earths and occasional 
deep clays. 
Scattered eucalypt woodland with 
tall Acacia ramulosa and mixed low 
shrubs or moderately close A. 
ramulosa tall shrubland. 
Gritty-surfaced plains 
(32)* 
Shallow coarse red 
clayey sands on 
granite. 
Scattered acacia tall shrublands 
often with Borya sphaerocephala in 
the ground layer, and very 
scattered low myrtaceous 
shrublands. 
Tallering (prominent 
ridges and hills of 
banded ironstone, 
dolerite and 
sedimentary rocks). 
Ridges and hills 
Shallow stony red 
earths. 
Scattered to moderately close tall 
shrublands of A. ramulosa and 
other acacias with undershrubs 
such a Thryptomene and 
Eriostemon spp. 
Steeped surfaces 
Stony soils. 
Very scattered mixed height 
shrublands with A. ramulosa and 
well developed non-halophytic 
understoreys. 
Hillslopes (2)* 
Shallow red earths 
and stony red earths. 
Scattered to moderately close tall 
shrublands of A. ramulosa and 
other acacias. Understorey species 
include Eremophila spp., Ptilotus 
obovatus, Thryptomene spp. and 
Eriostemon spp. 
Stony plains/gravelly 
plains 
Shallow stony red 
earth and red clayey 
sands with 
ferruginous gravel. 
Scattered to moderately close tall 
shrublands of A. ramulosa and 
other acacias. Undershrubs include 
Eremophila spp., Ptilotus obovatus, 
Thryptomene and Eriostemon spp. 
Narrow drainage tracts 
Deep red clayey 
sands. 
Scattered to moderately close tall 
shrublands of A. ramulosa and 
other species with Eremophila 
forrestii and Ptilotus obovatus low 
shrubs. 
Tealtoo (level to 
gently undulating 
loamy plains with 
fine ironstone lag 
gravel supporting 
dense acacia 
shrublands). 
Stony plains 
Shallow red earths on 
ironstone gravel or 
parent rock. 
Moderately close acacia tall 
shrublands. 
Gravelly plains/loamy 
plains 
Deep red earths on 
ironstone gravel or 
hardpan at variable 
depth. 
Moderately close acacia tall 
shrublands with Acacia aneura 
trees and A. ramulosa, or eucalypt 
mallee overstorey, or close 
Allocasuarina eriochlamys subsp. 
eriochlamys – A. coolgardiensis tall 
shrubland with low and mid 
myrtaceous shrubs. 
Gravelly hardpan 
plains 
Shallow hardpan 
loams or red earths 
on hardpan. 
Scattered to moderately close 
acacia tall shrublands including A. 
aneura, A. ramulosa, A. linophylla 
and A. acuminata subsp. burkittii.  

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Land system 
Landforms 
Soils 
Vegetation 
Gravelly sand sheets 
(13)* 
Shallow red clayey 
sands with 
ferruginous gravel on 
hardpan or gravel. 
Moderately close acacia tall 
shrublands with mallee eucalypts. 
Understorey species include 
Prostanthera, Phebalium and 
Mirbelia spp. 
Alluvial plains 
Deep red earths. 
Scattered acacia tall shrublands 
with Eucalyptus loxophleba 
overstorey and Atriplex 
bunburyana understorey or 
moderately close acacia tall 
shrublands. 
Yowie (loamy plains 
supporting 
shrublands of mulga 
and bowgada with 
patchy wanderrie 
grasses). 
Loamy plains 
Variable depth red 
clayey sands, hardpan 
loams and red earths 
on hardpan. 
Moderately close acacia tall 
shrublands, dominated by Acacia 
ramulosa, A. coolgardiensis, A. 
acuminata subsp. burkittii or A. 
aneura, often with emergent A. 
aneura trees, or Callitris 
glaucophylla trees, or mallee 
eucalypts. Occasional Eucalyptus 
loxophleba woodlands with acacia 
tall shrubs. 
Sand sheets (13)* 
Deep red clayey 
sands. 
Moderately close acacia tall 
shrublands, or acacia shrubland 
with mallee eucalypts, rarely 
Triodia basedowii hummock 
grasslands with acacia and eucalypt 
overstoreys. 
Hardpan plains 
Shallow hardpan 
loams, red clayey 
sands and red earths 
on hardpan. Deep red 
earths and sandy red 
earths. 
Scattered acacia tall shrublands. 
Gravelly plains 
Variable depth red 
clayey sands with 
ferruginous gravel 
over hardpan.  
Moderately close A. aneura or A. 
ramulosa tall shrublands with 
occasional mallees, and sparse 
perennial grasses. 
Narrow drainage tracts 
Deep red earths and 
juvenile alluvial 
deposits. 
Moderately close to close acacia 
tall shrublands with scattered trees 
and mallees. 
*Identifies the landforms that are the most similar to the modified Woodman FCTs.

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally.

YOW
TAL
JOS
EUC
TEA
TAL
486000
487000
488000
489000
67
86
00
0
67
87
00
0
67
88
00
0
67
89
00
0
67
90
00
0
±
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
Metres
Appendix A1: Land Systems in the Hinge Survey Area
Author: M. Gardener
Date:  12-12-2012
Datum:  GDA 1994  -  Projection:  MGA Zone 50  -  Scale: 1:15,000 (A3)
Drawn: C. Dyde
Figure Ref: 16002-12FMV1RevA_20121212_AppendixA1_LandSys
Karara Mining Ltd.
Hinge Vegetation and Flora Survey 
Legend
Hinge Survey Area
Tracks
Land Types 
(and their component land systems)
LAND TYPE 1.  Hills and ranges with acacia shrublands
Prominent ridges and hills of banded ironstone,
dolerite and sedimentary rocks supporting 
bowgada and other acacia shrublands.
Low granite breakaways with alluvial plains and
sandy tracts supporting eucalypt woodlands and
acacia shrublands.
LAND TYPE 5. Mesas, breakaways and stony plains with
acacia or eucalypt woodlands and halophytic shrublands
Tallering
Euchre
Undulating yellow sandplain supporting dense
mixed shrublands with patchy mallees.
LAND TYPE 26. Sandplains with acacia, mallees and heath
Joseph
Level to gently undulating loamy plains
with fine ironstone lag gravel supporting dense
acacia shrublands.
LAND TYPE 29. Sandy plains with acacia shrublands
and wanderrie grasses
Tealtoo
Sandy plains supporting shrublands of mulga and
bowgada with patchy wanderrie grasses.
Yowie
TAL
EUC
JOS
TEA
YOW

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study – Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally. 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study - Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Appendix B: Definitions, Categories and Criteria for Threatened and 
Priority Ecological Communities

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study - Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally.

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study - Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Table B.1: Categories of Threatened Ecological Communities (DEC 2010). 
PD: Presumed Destroyed 
An ecological community that has been adequately searched for but for which no representative 
occurrences have been located.  The community has been found to be totally destroyed or so extensively 
modified throughout its range that no occurrence of it is likely to recover its species composition and/or 
structure in the foreseeable future.  
An ecological community will be listed as presumed totally destroyed if there are no recent records of the 
community being extant and either of the following applies ( A or B):  
A) Records within the last 50 years have not been confirmed despite thorough searches of known or likely 
habitats or  
B) All occurrences recorded within the last 50 years have since been destroyed.  
CR : Critically Endangered 
An ecological community that has been adequately surveyed and found to have been subject to a major 
contraction in area and/or that was originally of limited distribution and is facing severe modification or 
destruction throughout its range in the immediate future, or is already severely degraded throughout its 
range but capable of being substantially restored or rehabilitated.  
An ecological community will be listed as Critically Endangered when it has been adequately surveyed and is 
found to be facing an extremely high risk of total destruction in the immediate future.  This will be 
determined on the basis of the best available information, by it meeting any one or more of the following 
criteria (A, B or C):  
A) The estimated geographic range, and/or total area occupied, and/or number of discrete occurrences 
since European settlement have been reduced by at least 90% and either or both of the following apply (i or 
ii):  
i) geographic range, and/or total area occupied and/or number of discrete occurrences are continuing to 
decline such that total destruction of the community is imminent (within approximately 10 years);  
ii) modification throughout its range is continuing such that in the immediate future (within approximately 
10 years) the community is unlikely to be capable of being substantially rehabilitated.  
B) Current distribution is limited, and one or more of the following apply (i, ii or iii):  
i) geographic range and/or number of discrete occurrences, and/or area occupied is highly restricted and the 
community is currently subject to known threatening processes which are likely to result in total destruction 
throughout its range in the immediate future (within approximately 10 years);  
ii) there are very few occurrences, each of which is small and/or isolated and extremely vulnerable to known 
threatening processes;  
iii) there may be many occurrences but total area is very small and each occurrence is small and/or isolated 
and extremely vulnerable to known threatening processes.  
C) The ecological community exists only as highly modified occurrences that may be capable of being 
rehabilitated if such work begins in the immediate future (within approximately 10 years). 
En: Endangered 
An ecological community that has been adequately surveyed and found to have been subject to a major 
contraction in area and/or was originally of limited distribution and is in danger of significant modification 
throughout its range or severe modification or destruction over most of its range in the near future.  
An ecological community will be listed as Endangered when it has been adequately surveyed and is not 
Critically Endangered but is facing a very high risk of total destruction in the near future.  This will be 
determined on the basis of the best available information by it meeting any one or more of the following 
criteria (A, B, or C):  
A) The geographic range, and/or total area occupied, and/or number of discrete occurrences have been 
reduced by at least 70% since European settlement and either or both of the following apply (i or ii):  
i) the estimated geographic range, and/or total area occupied and/or number of discrete occurrences are 
continuing to decline such that total destruction of the community is likely in the short term future (within 
approximately 20 years);  

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study - Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
ii) modification throughout its range is continuing such that in the short term future (within approximately 
20 years) the community is unlikely to be capable of being substantially restored or rehabilitated.  
B) Current distribution is limited, and one or more of the following apply (i, ii or iii):  
i) geographic range and/or number of discrete occurrences, and/or area occupied is highly restricted and the 
community is currently subject to known threatening processes which are likely to result in total destruction 
throughout its range in the short term future (within approximately 20 years);  
ii) there are few occurrences, each of which is small and/or isolated and all or most occurrences are very 
vulnerable to known threatening processes;  
iii) there may be many occurrences but total area is small and all or most occurrences are small and/or 
isolated and very vulnerable to known threatening processes.  
C) The ecological community exists only as very modified occurrences that may be capable of being 
substantially restored or rehabilitated if such work begins in the short-term future (within approximately 20 
years).  
VU: Vulnerable 
An ecological community that has been adequately surveyed and is found to be declining and/or has 
declined in distribution and/or condition and whose ultimate security has not yet been assured and/or a 
community that is still widespread but is believed likely to move into a category of higher threat in the near 
future if threatening processes continue or begin operating throughout its range.  
An ecological community will be listed as Vulnerable when it has been adequately surveyed and is not 
Critically Endangered or Endangered but is facing a high risk of total destruction or significant modification in 
the medium to long-term future.  This will be determined on the basis of the best available information by it 
meeting any one or more of the following criteria (A, B or C):  
A) The ecological community exists largely as modified occurrences that are likely to be capable of being 
substantially restored or rehabilitated.  
B) The ecological community may already be modified and would be vulnerable to threatening processes, is 
restricted in area and/or range and/or is only found at a few locations.  
C) The ecological community may be still widespread but is believed likely to move into a category of higher 
threat in the medium to long term future because of existing or impending threatening processes. 
 
 

Karara Mining Ltd 
Hinge Iron Ore Study - Vegetation and Flora Survey, May 2013 
 
Table B.2: Definitions, Categories and Criteria for Priority Ecological Communities: Priority Ecological communities (DEC 
2010). 
Possible  threatened  ecological  communities  that  do  not  meet  survey  criteria  or  that  are  not 
adequately defined are added to the Priority Ecological Community Lists under Priorities 1, 2 and 3.  
Ecological Communities that are adequately known, and are rare but not threatened or meet criteria 
for  Near  Threatened,  or  that  have  been  recently  removed  from  the  threatened  list,  are  placed  in 
Priority  4.    These  ecological  communities  require  regular  monitoring.    Conservation  Dependent 
ecological communities are placed in Priority 5.  
P1: Priority One – Poorly-known ecological communities 
Ecological communities with apparently few, small occurrences, all or most not actively managed for 
conservation (e.g. within agricultural or pastoral lands, urban areas, active mineral leases) and for which 
current threats exist.  Communities may be included if they are comparatively well-known from one or more 
localities but do not meet adequacy of survey requirements, and/or are not well defined, and appear to be 
under immediate threat from known threatening processes across their range.  
P2: Priority Two – Poorly-Known ecological communities 
Communities that are known from few small occurrences, all or most of which are actively managed for 
conservation (e.g. within national parks, conservation parks, nature reserves, State forest, unallocated 
Crown land, water reserves, etc.) and not under imminent threat of destruction or degradation.  
Communities may be included if they are comparatively well known from one or more localities but do not 
meet adequacy of survey requirements, and/or are not well defined, and appear to be under threat from 
known threatening processes. 
P3: Priority Three – Poorly-Known ecological communities 
(i) Communities that are known from several to many occurrences, a significant number or area of which are 
not under threat of habitat destruction or degradation or:  
(ii) communities known from a few widespread occurrences, which are either large or within significant 
remaining areas of habitat in which other occurrences may occur, much of it not under imminent threat, or;  
(iii) communities made up of large, and/or widespread occurrences, that may or not be represented in the 
reserve system, but are under threat of modification across much of their range from processes such as 
grazing by domestic and/or feral stock, and inappropriate fire regimes.   
Communities may be included if they are comparatively well known from several localities but do not meet 
adequacy of survey requirements and/or are not well defined, and known threatening processes exist that 
could affect them. 
P4: Priority Four 
Ecological communities that are adequately known, rare but not threatened or meet criteria for Near 
Threatened, or that have been recently removed from the threatened list.  These communities require 
regular monitoring. 
(a) Rare.  Ecological communities known from few occurrences that are considered to have been adequately 
surveyed, or for which sufficient knowledge is available, and that are considered not currently threatened or 
in need of special protection, but could be if present circumstances change.  These communities are usually 
represented on conservation lands.  
(b) Near Threatened.  Ecological communities that are considered to have been adequately surveyed and 
that do not qualify for Conservation Dependent, but that are close to qualifying for Vulnerable.  
(c) Ecological communities that have been removed from the list of threatened communities during the past 
five years. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə