Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002



Yüklə 62,92 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü62,92 Kb.
növüAudit

Dampierland 2 

A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002 

179 

Dampierland 2 (DL2 – Pindanland subregion) 

 

GORDON GRAHAM 



SEPTEMBER 2001 

 

Subregional description and biodiversity 



values 

 

Description and area



 

 

There are four basic components to the subregion. These 



comprise; 

• 

Quaternary sandplain overlying Jurassic and 



Mesozoic sandstones with Pindan. There are 

hummock grasslands on hills. 

• 

Quaternary marine deposits on coastal plains, with 



mangal, samphire – Sporobolus  spp. grasslands

Melaleuca alsophila low forests, and Spinifex  spp. – 

Crotalaria spp. strand communities. 

• 

Quaternary alluvial plains associated with the 



Permian and Mesozoic sediments of Fitzroy Trough 

support tree savannahs of ribbon grass (Chrysopogon 

spp.) – bluegrass (Dichanthium  spp.) grasses with 

scattered coolibah (Eucalyptus microtheca) - 



Bauhinia cunninghamii. There are riparian forests 

of river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and 

Cadjeput (Melaleuca spp.) fringe drainages. 

 

The climate is described as dry hot tropical and semi-arid 



with summer rainfall. The average annual rainfall is 

between 450 – 700 mm, slightly lower than the Fitzroy 

Trough subregion. The area of DL2 is 5, 198, 904 ha.  

 

The Pindanland subregion comprises sandplains of the 



Dampier Peninsular and western part of Dampier Land, 

including the hinterland of the Eighty Mile Beach. it is a 

fine-textured sand-sheet with subdued dunes and 

includes the paleodelta of the Fitzroy River. The 

vegetation is described primarily as pindan. This is the 

coastal, semi-arid, north-western margin of the Canning 

Basin.  

 

Broad scale vegetation mapping of the area describes the 



following components; 

• 

Mangroves. 



• 

Coastal dune communities. 

• 

Ephemeral herblands and/or grasslands with 



scattered low trees. 

• 

Mixed species tussock grasslands or sedgelands +/- 



emergent Pandanus spp. (screw palm). 

• 

Eucalyptus tectifica (Darwin box), Corymbia 



flavescens  woodland with Acacia tumida (pindan 

wattle) open-scrub and Chrysopogon  spp. (ribbon 

grass) and Triodia bitextura grasses. 

• 

Eucalyptus tetrodonta (Darwin stringybark), 



Eucalyptus miniata (Darwin woollybutt) +/- 

Eucalyptus  spp.  +/-  Livistona  spp. (fan palms) 

woodland with a ground layer of tussock grasses and 



Triodia bitextura

• 

Melaleuca citrolens (lemon-scented teatree) and 



Melaleuca  spp. (paperbark) low woodland with 

sparse  Chrysopogon fallax (golden beard grass) 

tussock grasses. 

• 

Adansonia gregorii (boab),  Bauhinia cunninghamii 

and  Grevillea striata (beefwood) grassy low open-

woodland.  

• 

Corymbia dampieri low open-woodland with Acacia 

spp. Shrubs and Triodia pungens (soft spinifex) and 



Triodia bitextura hummock grasses.  

• 

Eucalyptus brevifolia (snappy gum) low open-

woodland with Triodia  spp. (spinifex) hummock 

grasses or sometimes a hummock grassland without 

trees. 

• 

Acacia ancistrocarpa (Fitzroy wattle) and/or Acacia 



eriopoda (Broome pindan wattle) and/or Acacia 

monticola  (Gawar) tall shrubland with Triodia 

intermedia  (lobed spinifex) and Triodia pungens 

(soft spinifex) hummock grasses. 

• 

Grevillea refracta +/-  Hakea lorea corkwood open-

shrubland with Triodia pungens (soft spinifex) 

hummock grasses. 

• 

Triodia pungens (soft spinifex) and/or Triodia 



schinzii hummock grassland wooded with low trees 

and Acacia spp. Shrubs. 

 

Dominant land use



 

(see Appendix B, key b) 

 

(ix) 


Grazing – Native pastures 

(xi)   


UCL and Crown reserves 

 

Continental Stress Class



 

 

The Continental Stress Class for DL2 is currently 6, 



however, given the continuing impacts of landscape scale 

threatening processes this may need to be reviewed. 

 

Known special values in relation to landscape, 



ecosystem, species and genetic values

  

 



Rare Features: 

• 

Numerous patches of rainforest found mainly 



behind the coastal primary dune system with a 

structure unique to the Dampier Peninsula.  

• 

The extensive mudflats of Roebuck Bay and Eighty 



Mile Beach resulting from two major paleoriver 

systems. 

• 

The enormous numbers of migratory birds found at 



Roebuck Bay and Eighty Mile Beach. 

• 

Keraudrenia exastia and  Pandanus spiralis var. 



flammeus are both declared rare species. 

• 

The vast grasslands of the Roebuck Plains.  



• 

Coastal swamps adjacent to Eighty Mile Beach. 

• 

Claypans support populations the uncommon 



aquatic plant Nymphaea indica (G. Keighery pers. 

comm.).  

 

 

Centres of Endemism: 



Rainforest patches are particularly important to 

invertebrates such as Camaenid land snails and annelids. 

Camaenid land snails have a large number of endemic 


Dampierland 2 

180 

Department of Conservation and Land Management 

species and some endemic genera showing strongly 

localised patterns of endemism. All the rainforest patches 

studied to date have endemic earthworm species 

associated with them. 

 

Refugia: 

The nature of this aspect is poorly known. ‘Dry’ 

rainforest patches, (as well as swamp rainforests), 

Mangroves, Riparian zones and Springs (particularly 

associated with the Edgar Ranges area) provide dry 

season refuges. 

 

High Species and Ecosystem Diversity:  

Rainforests are defined by their vegetation associations 

and are resource centres for a variety of faunal taxa that 

are either directly linked to rainforests or are more widely 

ranging species that are dependent on them. Examples 

include fruit pigeons and flying foxes. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



Existing subregional or bioregional plans and/or 

systematic reviews of biodiversity and threats

 

 

The CTRC report in 1974 System 7 formed the basis of 



the Department’s publication “Nature Conservation 

Reserves in the Kimberley” which has itself been 

incorporated in a Departmental Draft Regional 

Management Plan. These reports were focused on non-

production lands and those areas not likely to be 

prospective for minerals. Action statements and strategies 

in the draft regional management plan do not go to the 

scale of subregion or even bioregion. Previous rainforest 

studies are applicable (McKenzie et al 1991). 

 

Apart from specific survey work there has been no 



systematic review of biodiversity but it is apparent that 

there are on-going changes to the status of fauna 

(particularly mammals) and plant taxa. There is 

reasonable evidence about continuing loss of species and 

changes to assemblages at the landscape level which are 

affecting vegetation structure (e.g. loss of shrub layer), 

composition (e.g. perennial vs. annual grasses), 

vegetation cover, leaf litter, and organics in the upper soil 

horizon. It is generally recognised that flow-on effects of 

changes in the physical components of the environment, 

vegetation structure changes and other factors (e.g. 

exotic predators) can have significant effects on fauna. 

Work to date has been of a general nature. 

 

Wetlands 



 

Wetlands of National significance (DIWA listings) 

 

Name and Code 

Description

1

Condition

2

 Trend

3

 Reliability

4

 Threatening 

Process

5

 

Bunda-Bunda Mound Springs WA016 

B17 

iii 


iii 

ii 


iv, vii 

Eighty Mile Beach System WA018 

A5 

iv 


vi 

ii 


iv, xii (excessive human disturbance

potential for irrigated agriculture using 

groundwater inland), xi (pollution is a 

potential threat) 

Roebuck Bay WA020  

A7 


Terrestrial ii, 

Marine iv 

Terrestrial iii, 

Marine vi 

ii 

xii (excessive human disturbance, non 



sustainable hunting of dugong), xi 

(pollution is a potential threat) 

Roebuck Plains System WA021 

A7 


iii 

iii 


ii 

iv, vii 


Willie Creek Wetlands WA022  

 

iii 



iii 

 

x (groundwater extraction, causeway 



construction), v (feral animals), xii 

(expansion of the town of Broome) 

1

Appendix B, key d; 



2

Appendix C, rank 2; 

 3

Appendix C, rank 3; 



4

Appendix C, rank 1; 

5

Appendix B, key e;  



 

Wetlands of subregional significance (in addition to the DIWA listed wetlands) 

 

No wetlands of subregional significance have been identified in DL2. 



 

Riparian zone vegetation 

 

Name Condition

1

 Trend

2

 Reliability

3

 Threatening 

Processes

4

 

All fringing vegetation of riparian zones

 

iii 


iii 

ii 


vii, iv, v (feral herbivores), x, vi 

1

Appendix C, rank 2; 



2

Appendix C, rank 3; 

3

Appendix C, rank 1; 



4

Appendix B, key e 

 

Ecosystems at risk 



 

Threatened ecological communities (TECs) 

 

Community Status 

NVIS

1

 Condition

2

 Trend

3

 Reliability

4

Threatening Processes

5

 

Monsoon (vine) thickets on coastal sand 

dunes of the Dampier Peninsula  



ii 

iii 


iii 

iv, vii, ii 

Species-rich faunal community of the 

intertidal mudflats of Roebuck Bay. 

40 


iii 

vi 


iii 

xii (human impact), xi (possible 

pollution) 

Disaster Bay organic mound spring 

communities. 

 

N/A 



ii-iii 

vi 


iii 

iv, xii (soil compaction by cattle; 

potential changes in sea level due to 


Dampierland 2 

A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002 

181 

climate change) 

Bunda Bunda organic mound spring 

communities 

N/A 


ii 

iii-iv 


iii 

iv, vi, xii (soil compaction and erosion) 

Assemblages of the organic springs and 

mound springs of Mandora Marsh area 

N/A 


i-ii 

iii 


iii 

iv (cattle), xii (soil compaction and 

erosion) 

1

Appendix B, key f; 



2

Appendix C, rank 2; 

3

Appendix C, rank 3; 



4

Appendix C, rank 1; 

5

Appendix B, key e 



 

Other ecosystems at risk 

 

There are many widespread vegetation types across this subregion that are threatened by changed fire regimes. 



 

Ecosystem Status 

NVIS

1

 Condition

2

Trend

3

 Reliability

4

 Threatening 

Process

5

 

Assemblages of permanent/ephemeral wetlands, 

damplands, and riparian habitat of the Dampierland 

region. 


V 15, 

38, 


42 

Variable 

iii 

ii 


iv, vii, v 

Organic mound spring communities of Lolly Well spring. 

P1 

N/A 


iii 

iv 


iii 

x (ground water 

abstraction), vii, xii (road 

construction is affecting 

salt inflow and fresh water 

outflows; litter), vi 

Nimalaica clay pan community. Inland from Willie Creek. 

P4 


42 

Unknown 


iii 

iii 


x (groundwater extraction, 

causeway construction), v 

(feral animals), xii 

(expansion of the town of 

Broome) 

Saline grasslands on tidal flats above high-water mark 

(Sporobolus virginicus dominated) on Dampier 

Peninsula/Broome area. 

P1 37 

Unknown vi  ii vii 



Vine thickets on heavily ferruginised Emeriau sandstone 

on Dampier Peninsula. 

 2 

Unknown 


vi  ii 

vii, 


Flora and fauna assemblages of spring communities 

Logues Spring, south-west Kimberley Edgar Range near 

Dampier Downs. 

 43  ii  iii  iii 

iv 


Assemblages of Culla Culla Creek – unusual spring site in 

Dampierland. 

  

Unknown 


vi ii 

Unknown 


threatening 

processes 

Assemblages of Taylors Lagoon, Lake Campion, and 

Lake Eda. 

V 42 

Unknown 


vi  iii Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

1

Appendix B, key f; 



2

Appendix C, rank 2; 

3

Appendix C, rank 3; 



4

Appendix C, rank 1; 

5

Appendix B, key e 



 

Dampierland 2 

182 

Department of Conservation and Land Management 

Species at risk 

 

Fauna 


 

Species Status 

Condition

1

 Trend

2

 Reliability

3

 Threatening 

Processes

4

 

SCHEDULE 1; RARE/LIKELY TO BECOME EXTINCT, DIV 1 (MAMMALS) 

Macrotis lagotis 

Unknown 



vi 

ii 


vii, v (predators) 

SCHEDULE 1; RARE/LIKELY TO BECOME EXTINCT, DIV 2 (BIRDS) 

Erythrura gouldiae E 

Unknown 


iii 

ii 


vii 

Erythrotriorchis radiatus 

 

V Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

SCHEDULE 1; RARE/LIKELY TO BECOME EXTINCT, DIV 3 (REPTILES) 

Caretta caretta E 

Unknown 


vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

Lepidochelys olivacea E 

Unknown 


vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

Chelonia mydas V 

Unknown 


vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

Dermochelys coriacea V 

Unknown 


vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

Eretmochelys imbricata V 

Unknown 


vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

Natator depressus V 

Unknown 


vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

SCHEDULE 4; OTHER SPECIALLY PROTECTED FAUNA. DIVISION 3 (REPTILES) 

Crocodylus johnstoni 

S4 Unknown 

iv iii 

Unknown 


threatening 

processes 



Crocodylus porosus 

S4 Unknown 

v iii 

Unknown 


threatening 

processes 



OTHER SPECIES AT RISK WITHIN THE SUBREGION 

Rhinonicteris aurantius 

S1 Unknown 

vi 

Unknown 


Unknown 

threatening 

processes 

Neochmia ruficauda subclarescens 

Near threatened 

Unknown 

iii 


iii 

vii 


Phaps histrionica 

Near threatened 

Unknown 

vi 


Unknown 

Unknown threatening 

processes 

Heteromunia pectoralis 

Near threatened 

Unknown 

vi 


Unknown 

Unknown threatening 

processes 

Ardeotis australis 

Near threatened 

Unknown 

vi 


Unknown 

Unknown threatening 

processes 

1

Appendix C, rank 2; 



2

Appendix C, rank 3; 

3

Appendix C, rank 1; 



4

Appendix B, key e 

 

Declared rare and priority flora 



 

Species Name 

Status 

Condition

1

 Trend

2

 Reliability

3

 Threatening 

Processes

4

 

DECLARED RARE FLORA 

Keraudrenia exastia 

CR 


Unknown 

iv 


iii 

xii (urban impacts; potential land 

clearing) 

Pandanus spiralis var. flammeus 

E Unknown v  iii  iv, 

vi 

PRIORITY 1 

Cullen candidum 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

Glycine pindanica 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

Nicotiana heterantha 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

Sauropus salignus 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

PRIORITY 2 

Gomphrena pusilla 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

Goodenia sepalosa 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

Nymphoides beaglensis 

2 Unknown 

vi 

Unknown 


Unknown threatening processes 

Olax spartea 

Unknown 



vi 

Unknown 


No known threatening processes 

1

Appendix C, rank 2; 



2

Appendix C, rank 3; 

3

Appendix C, rank 1; 



4

Appendix B, key e 

 

Analysis of appropriate management scenarios 



 

Reservation priorities of ecosystems 

 


Dampierland 2 

A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002 

183 

The following Dampierland vegetation associations are not reserved within the bioregion: 

 

Beard Veg 

Assoc. 

Description 

Area (Ha) 

32 


Shrublands, pindan; Acacia shrubland with scattered low trees over Plectrachne spp. and Triodia spp. 35,672 

37 


Shrublands; teatree (Melaleuca spp.) thicket.   

14,505 


41 

Shrublands; teatree (Melaleuca spp.) scrub.   

11,680 

60 


Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah woodland, Darwin box (Eucalyptus tectifica) and cabbage gum (Eucalyptus 

grandifolia) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.).  

36,558 


61 

Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah woodland, coolibah over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.). 81,828 

64 

Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah low tree; boab (Adansonia gregorii), bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii and 



beefwood (Grevillea striata) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.). 

460,411 


67 

Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah, sparse low tree; ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.) paperbarks (Melaleuca spp.). 28779 

73 

Grasslands, short bunch grass savannah, grass; salt watermarine couch (Sporobolus virginicus). 242,046 



93 

Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; Ranji bush (Acacia pyrifolia) over soft spinifex (Triodia pungens). 1,030 

101 

Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; Acacia spp. over soft spinifex (Triodia pungens). 13 



104 

Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; silverleaf grevillea (Grevillea refracta) and Hakea spp. over soft spinifex (Triodia 



pungens). 

90,204 


117 

Hummock grasslands, grass steppe; soft spinifex (Triodia pungens). 27,410 

125 

Bare areas; salt lakes.  



2,285 

126 


Bare areas; freshwater lakes.  

259 


175 

Short bunch grassland - savannah/grass plain.  

18,549 

676 


Succulent steppe; samphire. 

207 


699 Shrublands, 

pindan; 


Acacia eriopoda shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) and Eucalyptus setosa 

over soft (Triodia pungens) and Triodia bitextura on sandplain. 

1,885,682 

700 Shrublands, 

pindan; 

Acacia eriopoda shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) and Eucalyptus setosa 

over soft (Triodia pungens) and Triodia bitexturabetween dunes. 

1,046,019 

701 


Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; Acacia spp. and Grevillea spp. over soft spinifex (Triodia pungens) and winged 

lobed spinifex (Triodia intermedia) on sandy plateau. 

115,505 

702 


Hummock grasslands, grass steppe; winged lobed spinifex (Triodia intermedia). 25,551 

704 


Grasslands, short bunch grass savannah low tree and sparse shrubs; bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii), Broome pindan 

wattle (Acacia eriopoda) and Acacia spp. over Aristida spp. short grasses on river flats. 

65,444 

705 


Hummock grasslands, sparse tree steppe; snappy gum (Eucalyptus brevifolia) and bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) and 

roughleaf bloodwood (Eucalyptus setosa) over lobed spinifex (Triodia intermedia).  

19,218 

707 


Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah sparse low tree; bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii) and coolibah over ribbon/blue 

grass (Chrysopogon spp./Bothriochloa spp.) on black soil.  

215,223 

710 


Mosaic: Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah low tree; boab (Adansonia gregorii), bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii

and beefwood (Grevillea striata) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.)/hummock grasslands, grass steppe soft spinifex 

(Triodia pungens) and Triodia bitextura

27,073 


712 

Mosaic: Shrublands, pindan; Acacia eriopoda shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) and Eucalyptus 



setosa over soft (Triodia pungens) and Triodia bitextura/Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah low tree; boab 

(Adansonia gregorii), Bauhinia cunninghamii and beefwood (Grevillea striata) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.). 

258,457 

716 


Mosaic: Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah low tree; boab (Adansonia gregorii), bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii

and beefwood (Grevillea striata) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.)/Hummock grasslands, open low tree-steppe; 

snappy gum (Eucalyptus brevifolia) over soft spinifex (Triodia pungens) and lobed spinifex (Triodia intermedia).  

12,276 


721 

Hummock grasslands, sparse tree steppe; eucalypt and bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii) over lobed spinifex (Triodia 



intermedia).  

55,049 


722 Shrublands, 

pindan; 


Acacia spp. and Acacia eriopoda shrubland with sparse low Bauhinia cunninghamii and bloodwood 

(Eucalyptus spp.) over ribbon (Chrysopogon spp.) and Triodia bitextura

14,652 

724 


Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; Acacia spp. over winged lobed spinifex (Triodia intermedia).  

154 


737 

Shrublands, pindan; pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) and 

roughleaf bloodwood (Eucalyptus setosa) over Triodia bitextura

38,160 


742 

Medium woodland; river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and Terminalia spp. 11 

 

Beard Veg 

Assoc. 

Description 

Area (Ha) 

743 


Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah sparse low tree; Acacia suberosa and bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii) over 

ribbon/blue grass (Chrysopogon spp./Bothriochloa spp.) on black soil.  

4108 

745 Shrublands, 



pindan; 

Acacia spp. shrubland with scattered low trees over spinifex.  

246 


751 Shrublands, 

pindan; 


Acacia eriopoda and pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) shrubland with scattered low Eucalyptus 

confertiflora over Triodia bitextura

13,411 


752 

Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) over winged lobed spinifex (Triodia intermedia).  

7,129 

754 


Shrublands, pindan; pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) shrubland with Northern woollybutt (Eucalyptus miniata) and 

cabbage gum (Eucalyptus grandifolia) medium woodland over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.) and Triodia bitextura

195,258 

755 


Shrublands, pindan; pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) and Acacia spp. shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus 

spp.) and roughleaf bloodwood (Eucalyptus setosa) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.) and Triodia bitextura

19,881 

756 


Medium woodland; river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and Terminalia spp. mixed with coolibah and ghost gum 

(Eucalyptus bella). 

2,838 

757 


Shrublands, pindan; pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) and Acacia spp. shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus 

spp.) and roughleaf bloodwood (Eucalyptus setosa) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.) and Triodia bitextura

16,926 

759 


Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah woodland, coolibah over ribbon/blue grass (Chrysopogon spp./Bothriochloa 

spp.). 


55,395 

Dampierland 2 

184 

Department of Conservation and Land Management 

761 


Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; Acacia eriopoda and pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) over Triodia spp. and spinifex 

(Triodia intermedia) sandplain 

27,575 

762 


Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; Acacia eriopoda over soft spinifex (Triodia pungens). 7,939 

764 Shrublands, pindan; Acacia eriopoda and pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) shrubland with scattered low bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) 

and Eucalyptus setosa over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.) and Triodia bitextura

581,958 


765 Shrublands, 

pindan. 


185,199 

767 Hummock 

grasslands, shrub steppe; silverleaf grevillea (Grevillea refracta) over soft spinifex (Triodia pungens). 599 

770 


Shrublands; Wattle thicket near Broome. 

878 


771 

Shrublands, pindan; pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) shrubland with ghost gum (Eucalyptus bella) and roughleaf 

bloodwood (Eucalyptus setosa) medium woodland over Triodia bitextura

36,173 


840 

Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah, ribbon/blue grass (Chrysopogon spp./Bothriochloa spp.). 36,663 

854 Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah low tree; boab (Adansonia gregorii), bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii) and beefwood 

(Grevillea striata) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.) and blue grass (Bothriochloa spp.).  

5,975 

864 


Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah low tree; bloodwood (Eucalyptus spp.) over ribbon grass (Chrysopogon spp.).  

2,424 


866 

Grasslands, tall bunch grass savannah sparse low tree; bauhinia (Bauhinia cunninghamii) and coolibah over ribbon 

grass (Chrysopogon spp.) on black soil.  

7,152 


867 

Grasslands, high grass savannah low woodland; Darwin box (Eucalyptus tectifica) and cabbage gum (Eucalyptus 



grandifolia) over white grass (Sehima nervosum) and/or upland tall grass. 

5,239 


1271 

Bare areas; claypans. 

1,745 

2041 


Succulent steppe with scrub; teatree (Melaleuca spp.) over saltflats.  

153 


7001 Shrublands, 

pindan; 


Acacia eriopoda and pindan wattle (Acacia tumida) shrubland with scattered low Eucalyptus 

grandifolia and Eucalyptus setosa over ribbon (Chrysopogon spp.) and Triodia bitextura

110,505 


8003 

Grasslands, curly spinifex (Triodia bitextura). 123,265 

 

Poorly represented ecosystems subject to threat: 



 

Assemblages of permanent/ephemeral wetlands, damplands, and riparian habitat of the Dampierland region. 

Species-rich faunal community of the intertidal mudflats of Roebuck Bay. 

Monsoon (vine) thickets on coastal sand dunes of the Dampier Peninsula.  

Disaster Bay organic mound spring communities. 

Organic mound spring communities of Lolly Well spring. 

Nimalaica clay pan community. Inland from Willie Creek. 

Saline grasslands on tidal flats above high-water mark (Sporobolus virginicus dominated) on Dampier Peninsula/Broome area. 

Roebuck Bay freshwater seepage (sponges) community. 

Vine thickets on heavily ferruginised Emeriau sandstone on Dampier Peninsula. 

Flora and fauna assemblages of spring communities Logues Spring, south-west Kimberley Edgar Range near Dampier Downs. 

Assemblages of Culla Culla Creek – unusual spring site in Dampierland. 

Assemblages of Taylors Lagoon, Lake Campion, and Lake Eda. 

Assemblages of the ephemeral Claypan at Cape Borda 



Note: the lack of study in some areas precludes statements about the level of reservation required.

Subregional constraints in order of priority  

(see Appendix B, key g) 

 

Competing Land Uses:

 Pastoral production and mining. 

 

Economic Constraints:

 Land prices for pastoral leases. 

 

Other:

 Our knowledge of biodiversity patterns across the 

subregion’s landscape does not have enough resolution 

to accurately define all acquisition priorities on the 

ground. 


 

Bioregional and subregional priority for reserve 

consolidation 

 

The Dampierland has a ranking priority under the 



preliminary bioregional NRS priorities of 1 (see Appendix 

D, and Appendix C, rank 4). However this may need to 

be increased because of the creation of several 

conservation parks within the Fitzroy Trough subregion. 

There continue to be problems with the continued 

impact of inappropriate fire regimes and uncontrolled 

stock grazing. The fire issue is becoming particularly 

relevant for the Pindanland subregion. It can also be 

argued that there is a bias in the reserve system because 

some ecosystems not reserved are those that are being 

grazed and have been grazed the longest and are often 

burnt the most often (or the most frequency x intensity). 

In terms of priority the Pindanland subregion would have 

a higher priority than the Fitzroy Trough subregion. 

 

Reserve management standard 



 

The bioregion is ranked at poor (i) to fair (ii) (see 

Appendix C, rank 5). Apart from the donkey control 

program undertaken by the Department of Agriculture 

(WA) there are no concerted feral animal control 

programs in place. There is limited strategic aerial 

prescribed burning along with some opportunistic hand 

burns with the latter being confined to very small areas of 

the Fitzroy Trough subregion. Extent of other 

threatening processes, for example weeds, yet to be 

determined. Due to uncontrolled stock access, changes 

are occurring within parks particularly in valley systems.  

 

Estate Rank

1

 Issues 

National Parks 

Windjana Gorge 

ii 

Ranger presence during the tourist season. Full extent of threatening processes (Fire, weeds, feral animals) 



need to be documented.  

Geikie Gorge 

ii 

Full time ranger presence. Full extent of threatening processes (Fire, weeds, feral animals) need to be 



Dampierland 2 

A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002 

185 

documented. 



Conservation Parks 

Brooking Gorge 

Full extent of threatening processes (Fire, weeds, feral animals) need to be documented. 



Devonian Reef 

Full extent of threatening processes (Fire, weeds, feral animals) need to be documented. 



Nature Reserves 

Point Coulomb 

Full extent of threatening processes (Fire, weeds, feral animals) need to be documented. 



1

Appendix C, rank 5 

 

Off reserve conservation 



 

Priority species or groups 

 

• 

Threatening processes operate from the species to 



landscape level.  

• 

Little is known of the status of critical weight range 



mammals in Pindanland subregion.  

• 

Action is required to identify appropriate fire 



regimes.  

• 

The effect of fire and cattle on critical weight range 



mammals, granivorous birds and savannah 

composition and structure is of concern.  

• 

Changed grassland structures are of concern.  



• 

There is evidence that changes have, and continue, 

to occur for the balance between annual and 

perennial grasses.  

• 

Landscape level threatening processes also bring 



about changes to the organic profile layer in soils, 

water infiltration rates and surface flow velocity after 

rain.  

• 

Impacts on rainforest patches of inappropriate fire 



regimes and specifically rainforest fire/cattle 

interaction is of concern.  

• 

There have been changes to riparian zones due to 



the impact of changed fire regimes, grazing and the 

indirect effects from changed hydrology.  

• 

Action is required to identify what is at risk and 



components of the biota at most risk then 

recommend and research appropriate management.  

• 

Little is known of the distribution, status and impact 



of weed species. 

 

Existing species recovery plans 



 

The Action Plan for Australian Bats  

The Action Plan for Australian Birds 2000 

Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes  

Gouldian Finch Recovery Plan. 

Draft Kimberley Region Management Plan (various 

strategies). 

 

Appropriate recovery actions 

 

Fire Management: 

Move to biodiversity driven 

approaches to fire management strategies. Avoid 

frequent, broad scale, hot, late dry-season burning in 

savannah. 

 

Industry Codes of Practice:

 Need to define weeds 

priorities both in an agricultural resource sense and an 

environmental sense. Resources required for already 

identified State and regional weed strategies. 

 

Capacity Building:

 Need organisational responsibility 

for coordinating management efforts across tenure and 

management responsibilities. Local adoption of 

strategies. Capacity building in pastoral industry and 

Aboriginal groups to optimise biodiversity and savannah 

productivity. Minimise loss of the mineral A horizon and 

protection of organic layers. 

 

Environmental Management Systems:

 Removal of feral 

stock from conservation estate and management of stock 

on other lands e.g. close order husbandry of cattle herds 

to prevent overgrazing. Eradication of feral animals 

especially cattle, donkeys and pigs. 

 

Ecosystems and appropriate recovery actions 



 

This is a general savannah issue and fire is the main driver 

in addressing this. The next most important, and linked, 

issue is grazing. Actions that are required are linked to 

management research and better-coordinated efforts 

between Government agencies, the pastoral grazing 

industry, traditional owners and the broader community. 

For example with mound springs the recovery actions 

would be (ix) fire management, (vii) feral animal control, 

(vi) weed control. 



 

Existing ecosystem recovery plans 



 

There are no existing Recovery Plans that are relevant to 

any of the ecosystems at risk listed in DL2.  

 

Subregion priority for off reserve conservation 



 

For much of the subregion the off park conservation 

priority is (ii) (see Appendix C, rank 6), where a large off 

park effort needed, resource constraints and a limited 

community capacity exist. However for some focused 

areas (iv), limited off park measures will result in 

significant conservation gains. 

 

Conservation actions as an integral part 



of NRM 

 

Existing NRM actions 



 

Legislation:

 Pastoral lease inspections are undertaken by 

the Department of Agriculture and leaseholders notified 

of any problems via the Pastoral Lands Board. Final 

scenario is that the Commissioner for Soil Conservation 

can institute formal proceedings if issues are not being 

addressed. The last is rarely undertaken. 

 

Threat Abatement Planning as Part of NRM

Concerted and coordinated effort by the Department of 



Agriculture in the control of donkeys. 

 

Capacity Building:

 Land Conservation District 

Committees established and provide a venue for 

discussion on conservation matters.  

 


Dampierland 2 

186 

Department of Conservation and Land Management 

Integration With Property Management Planning

Catchment Planning and Landcare:

 Land Conservation 

District Committees provide an opportunity for 

integration of land management activities. 

 

Feasible opportunities for NRM 



 

Environmental Management Systems:

 Research is 

needed on the mechanism and impacts of threatening 

processes. Outputs of this should assess potential 

cost/effective solutions. There has been some 

development in the co-ordination of multiple research 

initiatives and communication of this; Environmental 

planning across tenure (weeds, fire and feral animals) 

coordinated through Land Conservation District 

Committees.  

 

Legislation:

 Improved implementation of existing 

legislation. 

 

Capacity Building: 

Improved communication required 

between all stakeholders and an acknowledgement of 

differing land management objectives. 

 

Other Planning Opportunities:

 Shire plan 

incorporating biodiversity objectives incorporating an 

acknowledgement of the worth of the natural 

environment e.g. tourism including the cost of 

management, for example in making national parks 

accessible. 

 

Integration With Property Management Planning, 

Catchment Planning and Landcare:

 Development of 

catchment and regional plans involving all stakeholders. 

 

Impediments or constraints to opportunities 



 

A limited financial resource is a major constraint. The 

number of people available to implement strategies is a 

constraint. There is a need to increase awareness of 

conservation values throughout the community. 

 

Subregions where specific NRM actions are a 



priority to pursue  

 

A more coordinated approach to land management 



would be necessary for both subregions however due to 

the continuing and growing impacts within the 

Pindanland subregion this may have higher priority than 

the Fitzroy Trough. The rank for both subregions is (ii) 

(see Appendix C, rank 7), indicating that there are 

significant constraints to integrate conservation as part of 

production or development system. 

 


Dampierland 2 

A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia’s 53 Biogeographical Subregions in 2002 

187 

Data gaps 

 

Gaps in data needed for the identification of 



biodiversity values and management responses 

 

Vegetation and Regional Ecosystem Mapping:

 Much 

finer scale (at 100,000:1 or better) vegetation and 



regional ecosystem mapping required for most of the 

widespread surfaces. This needs to align with soil maps 

and environmental geology maps and these do not yet 

exist at better than 1:250 000 scale. 

 

Systematic Fauna Survey:

 No systematic quadrat based 

fauna and/or flora sampling programme across the 

subregion to provide a basis for modeling species 

distribution and status. 

 

Floristic Data:

 Data is sparse. Some potential for 

adapting WARMS monitoring methodology. 

 

Ecological and Life History Data:

 Data is lacking on 

the habitat requirements of fauna species. 

 

Other Priority Data Gaps:

 Further research is required 

on the conservation status of many fauna and flora taxa as 

well as the effects of threatening processes such exotic 

predators (cats), stock (cattle, donkeys and pigs), fire and 

weeds. 

 

 



Sources 

 

References cited 



 

No. Author 

Date 

Title 

Publication 

Details 

Pub. 

Type 

714 


Dostine, Peter 

(1998).  

Gouldian finch recovery plan, Erythrura 

gouldiae 

Parks & Wildlife Commission of 

the Northern Territory, Darwin 

258 



Duncan, A., Barry Baker, G. and 

Montgomery, N.  

(1999).  

The Action Plan for Australian Bats.  

Environment Australia. 

298 



Garnett, S.T. and Crowley, G.M.  

(2000).  

The Action Plan for Australian Birds.  

Environment Australia, Canberra. 

483 


Maxwell, S., Burbidge, A.A. and 

Morris, K. (eds).  

(1996). 

The 1996 Action Plan for Australian 

Marsupials and Monotremes. Wildlife 

Australia Endangered Species Program 

Project Number 50.  

Environment Australia, Canberra. 

495 


McKenzie, N.L., Johnston, R.B. 

and Kendrick, P.G. (Eds.)  

(1991).  

Kimberley Rainforests of Australia.  

Surrey Beatty and Sons. 

R = Report; J = Journal article; O = Other. 



 

Other relevant publications 

 

See reference numbers 018, 094, 100, 118, 120, 132, 



173, 258, 268, 298, 418, 437, 483, 487, 488, 492, 495, 

551, 556, 595, 626, 634, 635, 636, 637, 648, 674, 692, 



693 and 714 in Appendix A. 

 


Yüklə 62,92 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə