Australian plants society south east melbourne region



Yüklə 409.08 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü409.08 Kb.

 

 

 



Dianella revoluta 

            AUSTRALIAN PLANTS SOCIETY 



SOUTH EAST MELBOURNE REGION

 

INC.

 

A00131128P 

PO Box 8835 Armadale 3143 

Email:  

aps.se.melb@gmail.com

 

APRIL NEWSLETTER 2015

   

     

 

 Meetings are held on the first Tuesday of each month, February to     

 December except November.   

    


 The venue is the Hughesdale Community Hall, Cnr Poath and       

 Kangaroo Roads, Hughesdale  (MEL 69 C7)   



 Visitors are always very welcome

 

     



COMMITTEE: 

  

 

 

     


PRESIDENT:     

         John Thompson 9598 6982 

thomme@netspace.net.au

     


      DEPUTY LEADER:            Helen Appleby    0419 310 849                                                                                          

      SECRETARY:   

         Helen Appleby     

      TREASURER:    

         Gillian Jervis   9569 5637   

gillianjervis@bigpond.com

 

      PUBLIC OFFICER:             Gillian Jervis  



     NEWSLETTER EDITOR:   Marj Seaton 9570 6293   

normarjs@hotkey.net.au

 

 

       



Please forward any newsletter contributions, comments or photos to Marj at 36 Voumard Street, 

Oakleigh South 3167 or to the email address above.  

 

Deadline for the May newsletter is April 27th 

 

APRIL MEETING 

Tuesday 7

th

 April 

Our speaker for April is to be Neville Walsh, discussing Pomaderris. 

 

Neville is the Senior Conservation Botanist at the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. His work 



involves survey and development of recovery strategies for threatened Victorian plants as well 

as taxonomic research in a number of plant groups, principally the genus Pomaderris in the 

family Rhamnaceae, Melicytus (Violaceae) and genera of Australian Asteraceae, Poaceae and 

Lobeliaceae (Campanulaceae subfamily Lobeloideae). Neville has a background in botanical 

survey, particularly of alpine/subalpine vegetation, and continues with this work from time to 

time. He is co-editor of the four volume Flora of Victoria and has submitted accounts of various 

plant groups for publication in the Flora of Australia. He is a member of the Australian Plant 

Census working group, the Mountain Invasions Research Network (MIREN) and is a member of 

recovery teams for threatened plants and animals in Victoria. 

 

Neville is an entertaining speaker who last spoke to us in April 2014 about his role at RBGM.  



Please come, invite some friends and listen to a specialist in his field. 

 

Verticordia grandis Drumm.   Scarlet Verticordia, Scarlet Featherflower 

Specimen grown by Ray Turner 

 

Verticordia grandis is a small to medium sized lignotuberous shrub, 1m - 2.5m high by 0.3m - 2m 

wide. It grows from Cataby northwards to Geraldton and as far east as Dalwallinu in the south-

west of Western Australia. It grows in heath or open scrubland in sands often with or over 

lateritic gravel and loam. The scarlet flowers are attractive to nectar feeding birds. Flowering is 

mainly between August and January but plants can flower intermittently throughout the year. 

 

 In cultivation a warm, sunny, well drained aspect is preferred with the plants not to crowded  so 



as to maintain good airflow around the plant. Most verticordias do not like growing in crowded 

conditions in a garden situation and can suffer dieback in some branches if adequate space is not 

maintained around the plant. Regular tip pruning is recommended to create a bushy plant. 

 

 Propagation is from cuttings, grafting or tissue culture. This species and other Verticordia species 



can be grafted onto either a Darwinia citriodora or Chamelaucium uncinatum  rootstock to 

improve reliability. Verticordia grandis will grow on its own roots quite happily in our sandy soils. 

 

 Verticordia is a member of the Myrtaceae family. A large family of c.3500 species in c.150 genera 



with c.1400 species in c.75 genera occurring in Australia. It includes such genera as Asteromyrtus

Beaufortia

CallistemonEremaeaEucalyptusHomoranthusKunzeaLeptospermumMelaleuca



Phymatocarpus and Regelia.  There are c.101 species with all but one species, V. decussata (a 

Northern Territory endemic) occurring in Western Australia.  

 

  The name Verticordia literally translated means ‘turner of hearts’, a reference to the Roman 



goddess Venus whose sacred flower was the Myrtle which belongs to the family Myrtaceae as 

does Verticordia. The specific name, grandis, is from the Latin, large, in reference to the 

size of the plant, its leaves and flowers.does Verticordia. The specific name, grandis, is from 

the Latin, large, in reference to the size of the plant, its leaves and flowers. 



2. 

PICK OF THE BUNCH 

 from the February meeting 

Apologies to Mandy and John that this did not appear in last month’s newsletter  -  a lightning 

strike played havoc with my computer - M.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. 

MARCH MEETING 

Speaker: Julie Shepherd      Topic: Bayside Nursery        Write up: Norm Seaton

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julie Shepherd, manager, told us that the nursery started out with volunteers providing 

indigenous plants to augment remnant bushland areas.  The volunteers produced and planted 

about 5000 plants.  The Bayside Council now provides two staff to manage the nursery and 

annual production of up to 100,000 plants  is used by Council for parks, gardens and bushland 

reserve revegetation work, and by golf clubs and private residents.  

Most plants are forestry tube size but about 8000 are provided as 150mm pots for Council 

gardens. 

Two volunteer sessions per week are attended by 5 to 18 people.  The experienced volunteers 

provide the on-going detailed knowledge base of the group about the locations and preferred 

growing conditions of the local plants.  

Seed and cuttings for propagation are sourced from remnant sites, preferably after burns to 

control weed species, and supplemented from nursery-grown plants. 

 

A large part of Julie’s work is coordinating the supply of plants to the 18 Friends Groups and the 



various Council crews which do the planting in the April to August period.  School groups also 

get involved in planting programs at their schools and in some reserves. 

Natural regeneration of plants in remnant bushland areas is preferred to planting nursery 

stock.  This process is assisted by controlled burning and hand weeding.  In some cases the 

main way of preserving plants which are now rare in Bayside such as Gompholobium huegleii (a 

bright yellow flowered small pea shrub) and  Pimelea octophylla (Woolly Rice-flower) is by 

nursery propagation. 


4. 

Julie shared some knowledge about using honey as well as rooting hormone on cuttings.  Her 

attempts to propagate Ricinocarpos pinifolius (Wedding Bush) by extended holding periods in 

pots may be showing some promise. 

The nursery buildings and layout will soon be modified to improve the work flow as the nursery 

continues to become more “commercial”.  



 

SPECIMEN TABLE 

Surely the most aromatic plant on the table tonight was Robert’s Murraya paniculata – an 

evergreen rainforest plant with 

dark foliage and lovely cream, 

highly scented flowers. His plant is 

22 years old and has grown to 4m 

x 1 1/2m.  It is easy to maintain, 

flowers prolifically and the bees 

love it.  Prune after flowering. 

Robert’s other specimen was of 

the purple flowering Thryptomene, T. denticulata.  It has 

grown to 1m x 1m and is also easy to maintain apart from 

having to pull off the webbing caterpillars at times. 

 

Mandy’s Acacia harveyi is a spindly plant which flowers for 



months (light yellow balls) and is currently 3m tall. It is 

Correa time and Mandy had two – C. bauerlenii (chef’s cap 

correa) and the cream C. backhousiana. It is also time for the 

autumn flowering Crowea exalata which does very well in 

partial sun.   

 

Others of Mandy’s collection were 



Grevillea nudiflora both straight 

leaf and curly leaf forms (this last 

being the ‘pick of the bunch’ – see 

later, and the bright magenta 

coloured Calytrix frazeri .  

 

Acacia harveyi 



5. 

 

                           

 

The Calytrix is growing on its own roots, is 



one metre high and likely to flower for 

months.  Mandy thinks that it is allergic to 

soil, having had some failures in the ground, 

so she keeps it in a pot in full sun. 

 

 Calytrix frazeri 

 

John  brought  in  two



 

really  interesting 

plants:    the  first  was  the  native  tamarind 

Diploglottis  campbellii  (which  can  grow  to 

30m  in the  wild)  and  this  one  had  several 

fruits.  One was splitting open to show its 

bright  red  edible  aril  which  surrounds 

quite a large stone. Jam can be made from 

the rather astringent aril. This plant grows 

in northern NSW and is currently 3 1/2m x 

4m  in  full  sun.    Being  a  rainforest  plant  it 

requires  extra  watering.  Each  fruit  can 

have  1,2  or  3  seeds.  The  plant  is  rare  and 

endangered in the wild. 

 

John’s  other  specimen  was  a  potted  Boea 



hygroscopica, which grows in creek lines in 

Queensland.  At first glance it appeared to 

be an African violet, to which it is related.  

Purple  flowers,  the  first  after  7  years,  are 

held  above  the  leaves  just  like  the  African 

violet. It is a type of resurrection plant; the 

leaves can dry out but will respond well to 

water,  however  the  plant  can  die  from 

overwatering.    Possums  seem  to  love  this 

plant so John is taking it inside each night. 

       

                                                                                        



 

We then had a brief discussion about how to deal with possums and John recommended ‘D-ter’ 

which is a powder (aluminium ammonium sulphate) and is dissolved in water before spraying 

on the plant to be protected. It is a registered animal deterrent. 



 

6. 

PICK OF THE BUNCH – MARCH 2015 

Grevillea nudiflora  C. F. Meisner   

Specimen grown by Amanda Louden 

 

 Grevillea nudiflora is a prostrate, spreading, occasionally suckering shrub to 3m across. It is 



found in the south west of Western Australia between Albany and Cape Arid. It is variable in its 

form and there are four main variations. They are, the Fine Leaf Form, which is the most 

common in cultivation, the Curly Leaf Form, which comes from the Point Anne region in 

Fitzgerald River National Park, a Broad Leaf Form from east of Ravensthorpe and a Shrubby 

Form that can attain a height of more than a metre. The bright red and yellow flowers are on 

long leafless stems and occur both within and beyond the foliage between winter and spring 

but also sporadically throughout the year. 

 

 In cultivation it is a relatively hardy plant that grows well in most well drained soils without the 



need for grafting. It is occasionally grafted on a tall standard rootstock of G. robusta to create a 

weeping standard. Flowering in garden conditions can occur all year round. A full to partial sun 

position is best. It makes an excellent plant to cascade over a wall or embankment. 

 

 Grevillea  is a member of the Proteaceae family, a family of c.1500 species in c.80 genera 



occurring mainly in the Southern Hemisphere in tropical and temperate regions with c.900 

species in 45 genera in Australia.  It includes such genera as AdenanthosBanksia



ConospermumDryandra, HakeaIsopogonLomatiaPersooniaStenocarpus ,Telopea  and 

Xylomelum. Grevilleas are members of the Proteaceae family and with over 350 species, 

Grevillea  is the third largest genus in the Australian flora.   

 

 The genus was named in honour of Charles Francis Greville (1749-1809), a founder of the Royal 



Horticultural Society. The specific name, nudiflora, is from the Latin nudus (naked) and flos 

(flower) alluding to the flowers shedding their bracts as the buds begin to expand. 

 

 

 



 

 


7. 

 

APRIL  MEETING: 



Supper

     Amanda Louden (remember to bring 1litre of milk please) 

Write up:   

Marj  Seaton

 

 

DIARY DATES  

Note that the September and October speakers have been swapped since our last newsletter 

due to a clash of events. 

April 4,5 

         “Back Lake” Open Garden, Scotsburn (see flyer) 

 

April 7 Meeting         Neville Walsh – Pomaderris 

April 11,12 

           Australian Plants as Bonsai National Symposium, RBGM 



April 11,12 

           APS Geelong plant sale40 Lovely Banks Road, Mel 431 D6 

May 3    

           APS Yarra Yarra Autumn Plant Sale, Cnr Brougham St & Main road,  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Eltham 10am – 3pm 



May 5                          Philip Plumb – Monash Remnant and Tree policies 

June 2                         Janine Duffy – You Yangs and ‘Koala Walkabout Tours” 

July 7                           Chris Lindorff – Nature photography 

August                        AGM 

September                 David Cantrill, possibly flora of Antarctica 

October 3,4 

           Grampians Pomonal Native flower Show, Pomonal Hall,9:30 am– 

5pm 

October 6                   River Yarra Keepers 

November                  Wonthaggi Desalination plant excursion 

November 15 – 20    ANPSA Biennial Conference, Canberra                                            

                                       

http://conference2015.anpsa.org.au 

December:                  Members’ Slides and Christmas break-up 

 

 



 

 

2016: 



October 8,9                FJC Rogers Conference – native orchids, Hamilton 

 

 



 

***Reminder: 

WONTHAGGI DESALINATION PLANT:  At the start of our February meeting, John 

talked about a visit planned to the Wonthaggi Desalination plant in November.  By show of 

hands, members agreed to the date chosen, Monday November 9

th

 and that we would go by 

private vehicle – perhaps car-pooling, rather than organising a bus which restricts everyone to 

coming and going at the same time.  There will be more details later about times, where to 

meet etc, but in the meantime, put the date into your calendar.

*** 


 

 

 



 

 


 

8. 


 

MONTHLY PHOTO GALLERY 

                  

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                              Wilbur, the swamp wallaby arrives and leaves from Ray’s garden. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə