Available online a



Yüklə 157,15 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.07.2017
ölçüsü157,15 Kb.

www.derpharmachemica.com



Available online a

 

 



 

 

 

 

Scholars Research Library

 

 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2015, 7(11):354-357



 

(http://derpharmachemica.com/archive.html)

 

 

 



 

ISSN 0975-413X

 

CODEN (USA): PCHHAX

 

 

354



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Chemical constituents of Raphanus sativus 



 

Consolacion Y. Ragasa

1,2*

, Virgilio D. Ebajo Jr.

1

,  Maria Carmen S. Tan

1

, Robert Brkljača



and Sylvia Urban



 

1

Chemistry Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004, Philippines 

2

Chemistry Department, De La Salle University Science & Technology Complex Leandro V. Locsin Campus, Biñan 

City, Laguna 4024, Philippines 

3

School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry), Health Innovations Research Institute (HIRi) RMIT 

University, GPO Box 2476V Melbourne, Victoria 3001, Australia 

____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

ABSTRACT 

 

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of the freeze-dried roots of Raphanus sativus afforded 3-(E)-

(methylthio)methylene-2-pyrrolidinethione  (1),  a  mixture  of  4-methylthio-3-butenyl  isothiocyanate  (2)  and  4-

(methylthio)butyl  isothiocyanate  (3),  β-sitosterol  (4),  β-sitosteryl-3β-glucopyranoside-6'-O-palmitate  (5),  

monoacylglycerols  (6),  and  a  mixture  of  α-linolenic  acid  (7)and  linoleic  acid  (8).  The  structures  of  1-3  were 

elucidated  by  extensive  1D  and  2D  NMR  spectroscopy,  while  those  of  4-8  were  identified  by  comparison  of  their 

NMR data with those reported in the literature. 

 

Keywords



Raphanus 

sativus

3-(E)-(methylthio)methylene-2-pyrrolidinethione, 

4-methylthio-3-butenyl 

isothiocyanate,  4-(methylthio)butyl  isothiocyanate,  β-sitosterol,  β-sitosteryl-3β-glucopyranoside-6'-O-palmitate,  

monoacylglycerols, α-linolenic acid, linoleic acid 

____________________________________________________________________________________________ 



 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Raphanus  sativus  commonly  known  as  the  radish  is  used  as  an  edible  vegetable  and  reputed  to  possess  diverse 

medicinal properties. The aqueous extract of  the bark  of R. sativus has  been  reported to significantly decrease  the 

weight of kidney stones and shown an increase in the urine volume of rats [1]. The fresh juice of radish exhibited 

gastroprotective potential [2], while the radish sprout exhibited hypoglycemic activity in rats [3] andhas also shown 

antioxidant  properties  in  rats  [4].  The  methanolic  and  water  extracts  of  the  radish  reduced  the  hepatotoxicity  in 

albino  rats  [5],  while  the  aqueous  extract  of  radish  seeds  exhibited  antibacterial  properties  [6].Another  study 

reported  that  4-methylthio-3-butenyl  isothiocyanate  obtained  from  the  radish  shows  antimutagenic  activity  [7], 

induced  detoxification  enzymes  in  HepG2  human  hepatoma  cell  line  [8],  reduced  cell  proliferation  in  a  dose-

dependent manner  and apoptosis in colon  carcinoma  cell lines [9].  Furthermore,  4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate 

isolated  from the  radishincreased significantly  the  p21  protein  expression  and  ERK1/2 phosphorylation in  a dose-

dependent  manner  to  inhibit  PC3  cell  proliferation(P≤0.01)[10]  andselectively  affected  cell-cycle  progression  and 

apoptosis induction of human leukemia cells[11].  Glucosinolates, isothiocyanates, phenolics and anthocyanins were 

reported as the chemical constituents  of the  radish sprouts and mature taproot [12].  The  major  fatty acids in seed 

lipids of the radish were reported to be erucic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids,while the major fatty acids in the 

radish family lipids were linolenic acid (52–55%), erucic acid (30–33%), and palmiticacid (20–22%)[13].   


Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al

 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2015, 7 (11):354-357 

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

355


 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

We  earlier  reported  the  isolation  of  β-sitosterol  (4),  unsaturated triglycerides  and the  essential fatty  acids,  linoleic 



acid (7)and α-linolenic acid (8)from R. sativus [14].  Recently, we reported the isolation and structure elucidation of 

a mixture of 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (2)and 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (3), and from radish 

roots [15]. Furthermore, β-sitosteryl-3β-glucopyranoside-6'-O-palmitate  (5),  monoacylglycerols (6), a mixture  of 

and 8, and triacylglycerolswere isolated from the partially hydrolyzed radish roots [16].  In addition to compounds 



2-8, we report herein the isolation of 3-(E)-(methylthio)methylene-2-pyrrolidinethione(1)from the hydrolyzed radish 

roots. 


 

 

 



MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

General Experimental Procedures 

1

H  (500  MHz)  and



13

C  (125  MHz)  NMR  spectra  were  acquired  in  CDCl

3

  on  a  500  MHz  Agilent  DD2  NMR 



spectrometer  with  referencing  to  solvent  signals  (δ  7.26  and  77.0  ppm).  Column  chromatography  was 

performedwith  silica  gel  60  (70-230  mesh).  Thin  layer  chromatography  was  performed  with  plastic  backed  plates 

coated  with  silica  gel  F

254


  and  the  plates  were  visualizedby  spraying  with  vanillin/H

2

SO



solution  followed  by 

warming. 

 

General Isolation Procedure 

A  glass  column  18  inches  in  height  and  1.0  inch  internal  diameter  was  used  for  the  fractionation  of  the  crude 

extracts.  Ten  milliliter  fractions  were  collected.    Fractions  with  spots  of  the  same  Rf  values  were  combined  and 

rechromatographed in appropriate solvent systems until TLC pure isolates were obtained.  A glass column 12 inches 

in height and 0.5 inch internal diameter was used for the rechromatography.  Five milliliter fractions were collected.  

Final purifications were conducted using Pasteur pipettes as columns. One milliliter fractions were collected.  

 

Sample Collection  

Three  (14.77)  kg  of  radish  roots  was  purchased  from  the  Arranque  market,  Manila,  Philippines  inJanuary  2015.  

This was identified as Raphanus sativus at the Botany Division, Philippine National Museum.   

 

 

Extraction  



Fresh  radish  roots  (14.77  kg)  were  peeled  and  cubed  in  one  inch  dimensions  before  lyophilization.  The  resultant 

dried samples (817.87 g) were incubated with freshly blended radish (3.53 kg) and two liters of distilled water for 

three hours. Two liters of CH

2

Cl



2

 was added to the mixture and left in a closed vessel for three days. After filtering, 

the  residue was washed  with one liter  of CH

2

Cl



2

. The washings and supernatant were combined for concentration 

and eventual drying of the sample using a rotary evaporator, which afforded an 8.5 g of crude extract. 

 

Isolation  

The  crude  extract  (8.5  g)  was  chromatographed  by  gradient  elution  using  increasing  proportions  of  acetone  in 

CH

2



Cl

2

(10%  increments)  as  eluents.  The  CH



2

Cl



fraction  wasrechromatographed  (3  ×)  using  5%  EtOAc  in 

petroleum  ether  to  afford  a  mixture  of  2  and  3  (9  mg)  after  washing  with  petroleum  ether.    The  50%  acetone  in 

CH

2

Cl



2

  fraction  was  rechromatographed  using  15%  EtOAc  in  petroleum  ether,  followed  by  20%  EtOAc  in 

petroleum ether.  The fractions eluted with 15% EtOAc in petroleum ether were combined and rechromatographed 


Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al

 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2015, 7 (11):354-357 

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

356


 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

(2  ×)  using  less  15%  EtOAc  in  petroleum  ether  to  afford  4  (25  mg)  after  washing  with  petroleum  ether.    The 



fractions  eluted  with  20%  EtOAc  in  petroleum  etherwere  combined  and  rechromatographed  using 

CH

3



CN:Et

2

O:CH



2

Cl

2



 (1:1:8 by volume ratio).  The less polar fractions were combined and rechromatographed (2 ×) 

using  CH

3

CN:Et


2

O:CH


2

Cl

2



  (1:1:8  by  volume  ratio)  to  yield  1  (12  mg)  after  washing  with  petroleum  ether.    The 

more polar fractions were combined and rechromatographed using CH

3

CN:Et


2

O:CH


2

Cl

2



 (1:1:8 by volume ratio) to 

yield  a  mixture  of  7  and  8  (8  mg).  The  60%  acetone  in  CH

2

Cl

2



was  rechromatographed  (2  ×)  using 

CH

3



CN:Et

2

O:CH



2

Cl

2



  (1:1:8  by  volume  ratio)  to  afford  6  (15  mg).  The  70%  acetone  in  CH

2

Cl



2

fraction  was 

rechromatographed (3 ×) using CH

3

CN:Et



2

O:CH


2

Cl

2



 (2.5:2.5:5 by volume ratio) to afford 5 (7 mg) after trituration 

with petroleum ether. 

 

3-(E)-(Methylthio)methylene-2-pyrrolidinethione (1): 

1

HNMR (CDCl



3

, 500 MHz): δ 2.79 (dt, = 2.5, 7.0 Hz, H

2

-

4),  3.67  (t,  J  =  7.5  Hz,  H



2

-5),  7.58  (t,  J  =  2.5  Hz,  H-6),2.51  (s,  Me-7),    7.62  (br  s,  NH); 

13

C  NMR  (CDCl



3

,  125 


MHz): δ 194.71 (C-2), 133.39 (C-3), 26.46 (C-4), 45.72 (C-5), 139.20 (C-6), 17.50 (C-7). 

 

4-Methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (2): colorless oil.  

1

H NMR (CDCl



3

, 500 MHz): δ 2.25 (s, Me), 3.53 (t, J = 

6.6Hz, H2-1), 2.50 (dt, = 7.2, 6.6 Hz, H

2

-2), 5.32 (dt, J =15.0, 7.2 Hz, H-3), and 6.18 (d, J =15.0 Hz, H-4); 



13

NMR (CDCl



3

, 125 MHz): δ 14.73 (Me), 45.13 (C-1), 33.88 (C-2), 120.04 (C-3), 129.15 (C-4), 131.39 (SCN).   

 

4-(Methylthio)butyl isothiocyanate (3): colorless oil. 

1

HNMR (CDCl



3

, 500 MHz): δ 2.09 (s, Me), 3.56 (t,  J = 6.6 

Hz, H

2

-1), 2.52 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, H



2

-2), 1.72 (m, H

2

-3), 1.80 (m, H2-4); 



13

C NMR (CDCl

3

, 125 MHz): δ 15.43 (Me), 



44.71 (C-1), 33.29 (C-2), 25.82 (C-3), 28.84 (C-4), 130.28 (SCN). 

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 



 

Silica gel chromatography of the dichloromethane extract of R. sativus roots afforded 3-(E)-(methylthio)methylene-

2-pyrrolidinethione  (1)  [17],  a  mixture  of  4-methylthio-3-butenyl  isothiocyanate    (2)  [15]  and  4-(methylthio)butyl 

isothiocyanate  (3)  [15],  β-sitosterol  (4)  [18],  β-sitosteryl-3β-glucopyranoside-6'-O-palmitate  (5)  [19], 

monoacylglycerols (6) [20], and a mixture of α-linolenic acid (7)[16]and linoleic acid (8) [16]. The structures of 1-

were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, while those of 4-were identified by comparison of 

their NMR data with those reported in the literature.   

 

The  pyrrolidine  alkaloid,  3-(E)-(methylthio)methylene-2-pyrrolidinethione  (1)  previously  isolated  from  radish 



seedlings  was  reported  to  inhibit  hypocotyl  growth  in  the  etiolated  cress  seedlings  at  concentrations  >30  mg/litre 

[17].4-Methylthio-3-butenyl  isothiocyanate  (2)  was  reported  to  be  the  principal  antimutagen  of  the  radish  [21], 

exhibited  chemopreventive  effects  against  pancreatic  carcinogenesis  in  hamster  [22],  and  showed  inhibition  of 

genotoxicity  in  in  vivo  and  in  vitro  assay  systems  [21,  23].    It  was  also  reported  to  possess  antimicrobial  activity 

[24],  exert  free  radical  scavenging  effects  [25,  26],  inhibit  cell  proliferation  [23,  27,  28]  and  induce  apoptosis  in 

human  cancer  cells  [24,  29].      4-(Methylthio)butyl  isothiocyanate(3)  exhibited  in  vitro  antineoplastic  activity  and 

selectivity  toward leukemia  cells [30], increased  in  a  dose-dependent  manner  p21  protein  expression  and  ERK1/2 

phosphorylation  to  inhibit  prostate  adenocarcinoma  cells  (PC3)  cell  proliferation  [31],  demonstrated  anti-cancer 

effects  (32-35],  selectively  affected  cancer  cell  growth  [36],  and  showed  potential  anti  proliferative  activity  in 

several cultured cancer cell lines [32, 36-38].    

 

Acknowledgement 

A research grant from the De La Salle University Science Foundation through the University Research Coordination 

Office is gratefully acknowledged.     

 

REFERENCES 



 

[1]G.  Stuart,  2014.  Raphanus  sativus–StuartXchange.    Downloaded  from  www.stuartxchange.com  /Labanos.  html 

on Sept. 7, 2014.  

[2]R. S. Vargas, R. M. G. Perez, S. G. Perez, M. A. S.  Zavala, C. G.  Perez, J.  Ethnopharmacol.,1999,68, 335–338.   

[3] S. Alqasoumi, A.-Y. Mohammed, A.-H. Tawfeq, R. Syed, Farmacia,2008, 56, 204–214.  

[4]H.  Taniguchi,  K.  Kobayashi-Hattori,  C.  Tenmyo,  T.  Kamei,  Y.  Uda,  Y.  Sugita-Konishi,  Y.  Oishi,  T.  Takita, 



Phytother. Res.,2006, 20, 274–278.  

Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al

 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2015, 7 (11):354-357 

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

357


 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

[5]J.Barillari,  R.  Cervellati,  S.  Costa,  M.  C.Guerra,  E.  Speroni,  A.  Utan,  R.  Iori,  J.  Agric.  Food  Chem.,  2006,54, 



9773–9778.  

[6] N. H. Mohammed, A. I. Abelgasim, A. H. Mohammed, J. Pharmacol. Toxicol.,2008, 3, 272–278.  

[7] E. Ivanovics, S. Horvath, Nature,1947,160, 297–298.  

[8] P. R. Hanlon, D. M. Barnes, J. Food Sci.,2011,76, C185–92.  

[9]Y.  Nakamura,T.  Iwahashi,A.  Tanaka,  J.Koutani,  T.  Matsuo,  S.  Okamoto,  K.  Sato,  K.  Ohtsuki,    J.  Agric.  Food 

Chem.,2001, 49, 5755–5760.  

[10]  P.  R.  Hanlon,  D.  M.  Webber,  D.  M.  Barnes,  J.  Agric.  Food  Chem.,2007,  55,  6438–6446.  [11]A.  Papi,  M. 

Orlandi, G. Bartolini, J.  Barillari, R. Iori,  M. Paolini,  F. Ferrori,  G.  Fumo, G. F. Pedulli, L.  Valgimigli,   J.  Agric. 

Food Chem.,2008,56, 875–883.  

[12] A. Melchini,M. H.Traka,S. Catania,N.Miceli,M. F.Taviano,P. Maimone, M. Francisco,R. F. Mithen, C. Costa,  



Nutr. Cancer2013,65, 132–138.  

[13] C. Fimognari, M. Nusse, R. Iori, G. Cantelli-Forti, P. Hrelia, Invest. New Drugs,2004, 22, 119–129.  

[14] R. M. Pérez Gutiérrez, R. L. Perez, Sci. World J.,2004, 4, 811–837. 

[15] C. Y. Ragasa, V. A. S. Ng, O. B. Torres, N. S. Y. Sevilla, K. V. M. Uy, M. C. S. Tan, M. G. Noel, C.-C. Shen, 



J. Chem. Pharm. Res.,2013, 5, 1237–1243. 

[15] C. Y. Ragasa, M. C. S. Tan, M. G. Noel, C.-C. Shen,Der Pharmacia Lettre2015, 7(2), 293–296. 

[16] C. Y. Ragasa, V. D. Ebajo Jr, M. C. S. Tan, C.-C. Shen, Res. J. Pharm. Biol. Chem. Sci., 2015, 6(5), 260–264. 

[17] M. Sakoda, I. Hase, K. Hasegawa, Phytochem., 1990, 29(4), 1031–1032. 

[18]  C.  Y.  Ragasa,  V.  A.  S.  Ng,  M.  M.  De  Los  Reyes,  E.  H.  Mandia,  G.  G.  Oyong,  C.-C.  Shen,  Der  Pharma 

Chemica. 2014, 6(5), 182–187. 

[19] V. A. S. Ng, E. M. G. Agoo, C.-C. Shen,C. Y. Ragasa,Int. J. Pharm. Clin. Res.,2015, 7(5), 356–359. 

[20] C. Y. Ragasa, G. S. Lorena, E. H. Mandia, D. D. Raga, C.-C. Shen,Amer. J. Essent. OilsNat. Prod.,2013, 1(2), 

7–10. 


[21] Y. Nakamura, T. Iwahashi, A. Tanaka, J. Koutani, T. Matsuo, S. Okamoto, K. Sato, K. Ohtsuki,  J. Agric. Food 

Chem.,2001, 49 (12), 5755–5760.   

[22]  T.  Okamura,  T.  Umemura,  T.  Inoue,  M.  Tasaki,  Y.  Ishii,  Y.  Nakamura,  E.  Y.  Park,  K.  Sato,  T.  Matsuo,  S. 

Okamoto,

A.  Nishikawa,  K.  Ogawa,  J.  Agric.  Food  Chem.,2013,  61,  2103−2108.  [23]  J.  Ben  Salah-Abbès,  S. 



Abbès, Z. Ouanes, M. A. Abdel-Wahhab, H. Bacha, R. Oueslati,   Mutat. Res.,2009, 677, 59−65.  

[24] S. S. Beevi, L. N. Mangamoori, V. Dhand, D. S. Ramakrishna, Foodborne Pathog. Dis.,2009, 6, 129−136.  

[25] J. B. Salah-Abbès, S.Abbès, M. A. Abdel-Wahhab, R.Oueslati, J. Pharm. Pharmacol.,2010, 62, 231−239.  

[26]  A. Papi, M. Orlandi, G. Bartolini, J. Barillari, R. Iori, M. Paolini, F. Ferroni, F. M. Grazia,  G. F. Pedulli, L. J. 

Valgimigli,  Agric. Food Chem.,2008, 56, 875−883.  

[27] H. Tokiwa, T. Hasegawa, K. Yamada, H.Shigemori, K. Hasegawa, J. Plant Physiol.,2006, 163, 1267−1272.  

[28]  M.  Yamasaki,  Y.  Omi,  N.  Fujii,  A.  Ozaki,  A  Nakama,  Y.  Sakakibara,  M.  Suiko,  K.  Nishiyama,    Biosci. 

Biotechnol. Biochem.,2009, 73, 2217−2221.  

[29] J. Barillari, R. Iori, A. Papi, M. Orlandi, G. Bartolini, S. Gabbanini, G. F. Pedulli, L. Valgimigli,  J. Agric. Food 



Chem.,2008, 56, 7823−7830.  

[30] C. Fimognari, M. Nüsse, R. Iori, G. Cantelli-Forti, P. Hrelia, Invest. New Drugs,2004, 22(2), 119-29.  

[31] A. Melchini, M. H. Traka, S. Catania, N. Miceli, M. F. Taviano, P. Maimone, M. Francisco, R. F. Mithen, C. 

Costa, Nutr. Cancer2013, 65(1), 132–138.  

[32] A. Melchini, C. Costa, M. Traka, N. Miceli, R. Mithen R, De Pasquale, A.Trovato,Food Chem. Toxicol.,2008

47,1430–1436.  

[33] N. Hanlon, N. Coldham, M. J. Sauer, C. Ioannides, Chem. Biol. Interact.,2009,177,115–120. [34]W. Wang, S. 

Wang, A. F. Howie, G. J. Beckett, R. Mithen, Y. Bao, J. Agric. Food Chem.,2005, 53, 1417–1421.  

[35] J. Jakubikova, J. Sedlak, R. Mithen, Y. Bao, Biochem. Pharmacol.,2005, 69, 1543–1552.  

[36] C. Fimognari, M. Nusse, R. Iori, G. Cantelli-Forti, P. Hrelia, Invest. New Drugs2004, 22, 119–129.  

[37]  E.  Lamy,  J.  Schroder,  S.  Paulus,  P.  Brenk,  T.  Stahl,  V.  Mersch-Sundermann,  Food  Chem.Toxicol.,2008,  46, 

2415–2421.  



[38] K. E. Harris, E. H. Jeffery, J. Nutr. Biochem.,2008, 19, 246–254.    

 


Yüklə 157,15 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə