Bob Marley’s Spiritual Rhetoric, the Spread of Jamaican Culture and Rastafarianism



Yüklə 97,81 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix15.05.2017
ölçüsü97,81 Kb.

 

 

 

 

Bob Marley’s Spiritual Rhetoric, the Spread of Jamaican Culture and 

Rastafarianism 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By 

 

Mark Haner 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Seminar: Hst 499 

Professor John L. Rector 

Western Oregon University 

June 16, 2007 

 

Readers 

Professor John L. Rector 

Professor Kimberly Jensen 

 

Copyright © Mark Haner, 2007 

 

 

 

 



 

 



The spread of Jamaican culture and Rastafarianism can be accredited to many 

events and technical advances in communication.  Bob Marley is one of the main 

influences the spread of Jamaican culture and Rastafarianism due to the lyrical rhetoric 

used in his popular music.  Growing up as an impoverished youth, Marley struggled to 

create a music career where his voice as well as others could be heard globally. 

 

Bob Marley’s lyrics contributed to the spread of Jamaican culture and 



Rastafarianism because the messages in these songs display the areas of class and 

Marley’s life in the Jamaica ghetto, Trenchtown. The nation’s capital city, Kingston and 

its largest ghetto, Trenchtown, was home to Marley for many years. Today it still retains 

much poverty and corruption, both politically and socially.  The messages Marley sends 

out in his music brings forward his memories of Trenchtown with its racism, oppression, 

violence, and poverty.   

The religious messages portrayed by the lyrics of Marley’s music also explore his 

beliefs in the religion of Ras Tafari; a religion that sprung up in Jamaica in the 1930’s.  

Rastafarianism helped lead a movement of cultural renewal among Africans. In the late 

1960’s and early 1970’s, Marley truly begins to accept this religion and incorporate its 

beliefs in his songs. 

Bob Marley’s lyrics spread his spiritual and political messages. The rhetorical 

strategies Marley used to persuade the audienceare simple language, words, and relaxing 

sounds.  They publicize important, and very intense political and social issues.  These 

issues include the living conditions of Trenchtown as well as the oppression he witnessed 


 

during his years with the “Rude Boys” or street gang of Trenchtown by using this 



informative lyrical persuasion technique. Marley is able to capture an audience who may 

not be particularly interested in or aware of politics or social issues.  

Bob Marley presents himself and his beliefs in a way that attracts a great range of 

listeners. They include those that enjoy his musical performances, as well as those who 

completely understand and appreciate his lyrical messages.  For many people around the 

world, Marley’s characteristics and person became Jamaican and Rastafarian culture. 

Originally from Jamaica, a country very dependent on tourism, Marley captured 

the attention of audiences with different political and social views and offered his 

message to them subtly.  The article titled Walk Good: West Indian Oratorical Traditions 

in Bob Marley’s Uprising

1

 compares and relates this to the oral traditions used in the 



West Indies as well as in West Africa, as tribal leaders used words, strategies, and 

rhetoric to capture the attention of their audiences.  “In the West Indies as well as in West 

Africa, the aesthetic appeal of an argument guarantees it validity.  And because, 

controversially, a truth presented without skill is hardly the truth at all.”

2

                                                



1

 Hodges, Hugh. “Walk Good: West Indian Oratorical Traditions in Bob Marley’s Uprising.” Journal of 

Commonwealth Literature 40.2 (2005). 

  The lyrics in 

the music Marley wrote and sang are much like these speeches and stories tribal leaders 

tell.  Marley’s music has an aesthetic appeal with soothing and sometimes driving reggae 

tones and beats.  Many people who may not comprehend or even listen to the lyrics 

Marley sings, may still enjoy his music and the talent he displays with his 

instrumentation. 

2

 Hodges pp. 43. 



 

Marley and the traditional Rastafarianism lifestyle, as well as his rhetoric, are 



similar to those of tribes in other parts of the world.  This creates a “tribal mystic” or 

person whom is one with the world around him, his spirituality, and appreciates life more 

than others. 

This study connects Marley and the West Indies because they are both very 

spiritual.  Bob Marley, a believer in the religion of Rasta, uses many “Biblical” messages 

as well as folk proverbs, sayings and turns of speech from Jamaican heritage, to connect 

himself with his audience.  “Anand Prahlad has likened Marley’s live performances to 

those of ‘fire-and-brimstone-style Jamaican preachers.’”

3

Marley made a remarkable impact on many regions of the world.  The spread of 



the Rasta religion is partly due to his music and his ability to spread his music to 

communities of Rastafarians in Britain, Canada, the United States, and the Caribbean.  

His death in 1981 caused a remarkable impact on the music world.  On Thursday May 21, 

1981, the people of Jamaica gave Robert Nesta Marley an official funeral.  Following the 

service, Marley's body was taken to his birthplace at Nine Mile, on the north side of the 

island of Jamaica, where it now rests in a mausoleum. Both the Prime Minister and the 

Leader of the Opposition attended the funeral.  

  This is debatable, however, in 

a literal sense due to Marley’s passive nature and sound.  As an artist Marley was not 

dogmatic but rather an advocate for his values of peace, justice, and equality. 

                                                

3

 Hodges pp 43. 



 

Paul Gilroy’s article “Could You Be Loved? Bob Marley, Anti-Politics and 



Universal Sufferation,”

4

Gilroy defines Marley calling him the greatest man in reggae music and the 



greatest leader and proponent of the spread of the Rasta religion.  This article poses 

Marley “as an icon for the struggle for justice, peace and human rights”

 gives a detailed biography on Marley from his birth on February 

6, 1945 and background.  His father who was white and his mother who was  black. The 

article  covers Marley’s amazingly fruitful career in which he had many top hits around 

the world with his largest audiences being in the United Kingdom as well as the 

Caribbean.   

5

Although opposed to many established governmental policies, Marley was not an 



anti-establishment advocate.  He was an individual that believed governments and 

everyday people, such as those who may not be involved in politics, needed to look out 

for their fellow humans and treat all people equally regardless of ethnicity and income. 

Marley used his music to bring many social issues to the forefront that had previously 

been suppressed.  Many of these issues were not suppressed because of their nature, but 

because of the lack of influence Jamaica had on the world. 

 not just another 

musician or pop icon. 

The country of Jamaica is highly dependant on tourism and agricultural exports 

such as raw sugar.  By-products of the raw sugar production are molasses and rum.  Due 

to these limited industries, most citizens of Jamaica are of the working class and this 

                                                

4

 Gilroy, Paul. “Could You Be Loved? Bob Marley, Anti-Politics and Universal Sufferation.” Critical 



Quarterly 47.1/(Spring 2005): 226-245. 

5

 Gilroy, 232. 



 

creates a service and now, product-based economy typical of the developing world.  



Marley focuses on the situations he experienced both in his hometown of Kingston while 

living in Trenchtown and through his travels in his career.  The article analyzes the 

political messages Marley sends out and relates them to the real life situations, such as 

poverty, oppression, and political corruption.  Like Martin Luther King, Bob Marley 

fought against social injustice using a non violent method.  “I have a duty to tell the truth 

as I have been told it. I will keep on doing it until I am satisfied the people have the 

message that Rastafari is the almighty and all we black people have redemption just like 

anyone else. Not for money will I do anything man, but because I have something to 

do.”

6

A work which focuses primarily on the political aspects of Bob Marley’s ideology 



and his portrayal of his beliefs in his music

   


 is by Angelica Gallardo, and is titled “Get up, 

Stand up”

8

 

Bob Marley began recording songs very early at the age of seventeen, with two 



songs called Judge Not (Unless You Judge Yourself) and One Cup of Coffee.  Throughout 

the lyrics in his music, the messages of his Rastafarian beliefs are spelled out in musical 

form.  In the song titled Exodus

.  Through these descriptions, Gallardo shows that Marley lead a musical 

revolution and through that revolution, brought the political realm into his music, with 

the steadfast attachment to his ideas of poverty, oppression, and political corruption. 

9

                                                



6

 Gallardo pp. 202. 

 Marley sings about a movement of “Jah” people or 

God’s people.  He asks for the listener to open his eyes and hear Jah’s words because he 

8

 Gallardo, Angelica. “Get up, Stand up.” Peace Review 15.2 (June 2003). 



9

 Marley, Bob Nesta. The Best of Bob Marley and the Wailers. N.p.: Hal-Leonard, 1995. pp. 43. 



 

has important things to say.  Marley warns of the fact that many people will try to fight 



you for your beliefs and faith, but if you persevere, you will be successful and see “the 

light.”  Marley states that his generation is the one that will “trod” through great 

tribulations and fight through adversities to complete this movement towards Africa of 

the Rastafaris.   Marley, in the next verse, questions the listener about their happiness and 

their own internal image.  He reminds the listener that they know their roots and their 

future due to their faithful reverence. He also says that they should stay strong their 

reverence and faithfulness, and continue in this Rasta movement.   This song serves as a 

reminder to keep listeners close to the faith and to remind them that others are enduring 

the same type of hard times and tribulations.  Marley believes that if these people move 

together they can create a great change and move out of Babylon.  To the Rasta religion, 

Babylon refers to Western Civilization and capitalism. In the Rasta faith, the believers are 

not to work in Babylonian corrupt society, which is built on the sufferings of the World’s 

oppressed.  Rastafaris are to wait passively for the fall of Babylon. They are not to cut 

their hair, allowing them to form “nappy” dreadlocks. 

The beginning for Bob Marley’s interest in the Rasta movement, began in1966, 

while he was visiting his mother in Delaware.    While Marley was there, he missed the 

visit of the Emperor of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie to Jamaica.  Emperor Selassie represents 

the “prophet” of the Rasta Movement in the eyes of most Jamaicans. and his presence 

brought throngs of Jamaican Rastafaris to see him.    Marley’s wife Rita, witnessed 

Selassie passing through Jamaica in his motorcade.  She swore she saw the mark of 



 

stigmata on his palm and from that moment on, swore her unwavering faith to the 



religion of Rasta.   

  When Marley returned to Jamaica to hear this observation from his wife, he 

began to explore the religion himself and began his path to becoming a Rastafari.  

“According to some accounts, he adopted the religion as early as 1967 or 1968.  But 

according to Timothy White’s meticulous biography, Catch a Fire,

10

 Marley’s 



conversion wasn’t complete until the early seventies.”

11

In Marley’s song Africa Unite,



   Based on interviews with Rita 

and his many children, White’s biography explores the intimate details of Marley’s life 

including the great details of life on tour as an international reggae icon.  White refrains 

from any opinion about Marley himself but prefers that the facts to decide whether the 

reader favors or disapproves of him. 

12

                                                



10

 White, Timothy. Catch A Fire. New York City: Henry Holt Company LLC, 2000.  

 he begins with the lyrics that the 

Rastafaris are moving out of Babylon in the land of their father or Africa.    He 

then sings about the greatness and the beauty of the African unification and the 

children of the Rasta man and higher man.   These lyrics voice the basis for the 

Rasta religion.   

 

11



 Gilmore, Mikal. "The Life and Times of Bob Marley: How He Changed the World." 

     Rolling Stone 10 Mar. 2005: 25-30. 

12

 Marley pp 10. 



 

Rasta believers consider their religion to be the purest form of Christianity 



as well as the purest form of Judaism.

13

Rasta leaders urged that it be smoked as a religious rite, alleging that it 



was found growing on the grave of King Solomon and citing biblical 

passages, such as Psalms 104:14, to attest to its sacramental properties: 

‘He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the service of 

man, that he may bring forth food out of the earth.’

  Their reference to God often comes with 

the synonymous use of the word “Jah”.  The land of the true Zion is Ethiopia and 

Emperor Haile Selassie is their “prophet.”  The holy sacraments as laid out in 

their holy book of folklore, “The Holy Piby,” although they have no true holy 

book. They believe that smoking of marijuana, “Weed of Wisdom,” or “Ganja;” 

enlightens them spiritually.  Though many people view Rastafaris as avid 

smokers, in their defense, they believe that it brings a person closer to himself or 

herself and allows for a deeper self-discovery.  

14

 

   



Bob Marley overused many of drugs like many other popular musicians. 

Not only did Marley use marijuana as a sacrament, but also as a recreational drug. 

Ganja became such an addiction and important part of Marley’s life that when he 

was buried with his guitar, and a wig made out of his dread locks that he lost with 

his cancer treatments, his family also included a substantial amount of marijuana 

in his casket.  While on tours, not only did he smoke ganja but he used many 

other drugs, such as cocaine, heroine and methamphetamines.  If Rita caught band 

                                                

13

 "His Life and Legacy." Bob Marley's Official Website. Winter 2007. The Family of 



 Robert Nesta Marley. 22 Feb. 2007 

     index.jsp>. 

14

 Web.bobmarley.com 



 

10 


members using drugs on tour, she often got upset with Marley.

15

Rastafaris have some strict limitations on what they consume.  They are 



advised to abstain from alcohol, tobacco, shellfish, scale less fish, snails predatory 

and scavenging marine life, and many day to day comforts such as salt, as well as 

meats, especially pork.  These are all items that are not considered to be “Ital” or 

impure and unclean. The word “Ital” is a word similar to the word “kosher” in the 

Jewish faith and is a word that denotes an acceptable food source. Although an 

import part of the faith of Marley, the food and “ital” idea is not sang about as 

much as concepts such as praise, in his songs. 

  When drug use 

by Marley and his band members began to cause problems between Marley and 

his family, he eventually quit using them except marijuana. 

The song titled Thank You Lord

16

Thank you, Lord, for what you've done for me.  



Thank you, Lord, for what you're doing now. 

Thank you, Lord, for ev'ry little thing. 

Thank you, Lord, for you made me sing. 

Say I'm in no competition,  

But I made my decision. 

You can keep your opinion. 

I'm just calling on the wise man's communion.

 resembles a hymn because it speaks about 

praising the Lord directly.   

17

 



 

 

Bob Marley begins by thanking the Lord for what he has done for him personally, 



and thanks him for what he continues to do.  Marley credits the Lord for his singing 

                                                

15

 White. 


16

 Marley pp 187. 

17

 Marley pp 187. 



 

11 


ability because he based his career on the Lord.  What is most interesting about the lyrics 

in this song is the fact that Marley calls him “Lord” and not “Jah” even through this song 

was composed in 1976 by Marley himself.  The next verse Marley denounces any 

competition in his career with any other artists, and calls on the wise man’s (lord’s) 

communication and guidance. After the chorus, Marley lets the listener know that he is 

unafraid of the humiliation he may endure due to his faith and that he is determined to not 

give into temptation.  This song praises the Lord and thanks him for the career that he has 

given Marley and gives all the glory to the Lord.  Similar to many of his songs about 

religion, the temptations and toil a Rastafari will endure are also mentioned as well as the 

steadfast goal that each has to not waiver from their faith. 

The sincerity of Marley’s beliefs and preaching have been questioned by people 

around the world and even by some Rastafaris.  These questions rise from his 

participation in the capitalistic world.  He continued to make and sell his albums on an 

international scale and therefore was actively involved in capitalism. He also wrote and 

performed over 200 songs with nearly two–thirds of those songs making references to the 

Rasta religion. Through his performances he spread the ideas and influences of the Rasta 

religion to form numerous communities in places such as Britain, Canada, and the United 

States. 


After fully committing himself into Rastafarianism, Bob Marley formed his 

musical group “The Wailers.” They included other avid believers, Neville Livingston or 

Bunny Wailer and Peter McIntosh or Peter Tosh. They performed together and released 


 

12 


their debut album called “Soul Rebel” in 1970.  Bob Marley and the Wailers had 

previously recorded and released albums separately, but none were ever as successful as 

the ones these two talented musicians produced together. 

The life of Bob Marley began in a rural Jamaican village known as Nine Miles, 

which is in the St. Ann Parish.  Captain Norval Marley, a white overseer on British 

government land, met Cedella, a black woman only seventeen years old at the time.  

After Captain Marley had relations with Cedella he promised her marriage, but within 

hours of the birth of Robert Nesta Marley on February 6, 1945,

18

The song, Trenchtown Rock,



 He deserted her.  

Marley’s songs of the ghetto relate how his upbringing in Trenchtown affected his life 

and that of his friends.   

19

One good thing about music, when it hits you fell no pain (repeat) 



So hit me with music, hit me with music 

Hit me with music, hit me with music now 

I got to say trench town rock 

I say don't watch that 

Trench town rock, big fish or sprat 

Trench town rock, you reap what you sow 

Trench town rock, and everyone know now 

Trench town rock, don't turn your back 

Trench town rock, give the slum a try 

Trench town rock, never let the children cry 

Trench town rock, cause you got to tell jah, jah why.

 relates the pains that come from living in the 

ghetto.   

20

 

 



These pains may come from hunger, or sadness of the current living situation, or 

even from the fact that the local government will do nothing to improve the area of 

                                                

18

 www.bobmarley.com  



19

 Find your favorite song lyrics! Search over 100,000 songs!  3 May 2007 

20

 http://www.lyricsearch.net 



 

13 


Trenchtown.  Marley then moves on to say to the listener that even though he has left 

Trenchtown, he will not turn his back on his roots and he will always “give the slum a 

try.”

21

Trenchtown has houses made mostly of corrugated metals and tarpaper roofs.  At 



a young age, Bob Marley became involved with the “rude boys” being a target of their 

teasing and bullying, due to his multi-racial background.  It was not long however, until 

these thugs began to respect and look to Marley as a leader.  “To Cedella’s dismay, her 

son began to come into his own there – to find a sense of community and purpose amid 

rough conditions and rough company, including the local street gangs.”

  In not turning his back,  he will not let the children cry and he will be continually 

praying to Jah for those people who are still in the slum and can not get out.  This song 

recognizes that people who live in Trenchtown have no voice on a national or global 

scale. In 1950, Cedella moved herself and her five-year-old son to Kingstown’s 

Trenchtown.  Trenchtown, deriving its name from the large sewer trench, which runs 

through the center of the ghetto or slum, became notorious during this time for the “rude 

boys” or gangs of young men who were very violent.   

22

 

Enveloped within the harsh streets of Trenchtown, Marley discovered the 



Kingston electric rhythm and blues genre of music and the scene in which this musical 

sound inhibited.  Marley entered this scene right at the time of its transformation from the 

acceptance of the American sound coming from New Orleans, but had a Jamaican twist 

that shifted the focus of the music to the offbeat.  The up and coming artists of this new 

 

                                                



21

 http://www.lyricsearch.net 

22

 Gilmore. 



 

14 


Jamaican sound began singing of their life stories and of the troubles and joys of being 

who they were as people much like calypso and mento.  Quickly a community 

surrounded this music due to its great ability to relate to these true and personal stories 

through music.  This music, which became known as ska after the rhythms it used, was 

not accepted by all however.  Much like the rock and roll music of America, the Jamaican 

politicians and ministers viewed this music as disruptive and felt that it fueled the 

violence and disorderliness of the “rude boys.”  “But the Rude Boys would soon receive 

an unexpected jolt of validation.”

23

 

Belly Full also known as Them Belly Full (But We Hungry)



 

24

Them belly full, but we hungry; 

A hungry mob is a angry mob. 

A rain a-fall, but the dirt it tough; 

A yot a-yook, but d' yood no 'nough. 

 

You're gonna dance to jah music, dance; 



We're gonna dance to jah music, dance, oh-ooh! 

 

Forget your troubles and dance! 



Forget your sorrows and dance! 

Forget your sickness and dance! 

Forget your weakness and dance! 

 

Cost of livin' gets so high, 



Rich and poor they start to cry: 

Now the weak must get strong; 

They say, "oh, what a tribulation!"

 is a call by Marley 

for the government to help the poor, starving people of Trenchtown as well as the world’s 

impoverished people.   

25

 

 



                                                

23

 Gilmore. 



24

 Marley pp 15. 

25

 Marley pp 15. 



 

15 


The song sings of the hungry people around the world and how a hungry mob is an angry 

mob.  Marley then tells the listener to forget their troubles, sorrow, sickness, and 

weakness and dance because this will remove the pain temporarily and take their mind 

off their sad situation.  He reminds the people to be strong and informs them that this is 

nothing more than another tribulation that is bringing them closer to Jah.  In singing this 

song, Marley is being positive and taking on the role of a helpful big brother to those 

oppressed.  He is soothing their sadness and weakness through his song, which gave their 

misery company and also gave them a way to temporarily relieve their pain and suffering. 

 

Three Little Birds

26

"don't worry about a thing, 



'cause every little thing gonna be all right. 

Singin': "don't worry about a thing, 

'cause every little thing gonna be all right!" 

 

Rise up this mornin', 



Smiled with the risin' sun, 

Three little birds 

Pitch by my doorstep 

Singin' sweet songs 

Of melodies pure and true, 

Sayin', ("this is my message to you-ou-ou:")



 is a song that brings a happy light onto the bad situation of the 

Trenchtown lifestyle.   

27

 

 



Bob Marley begins by singing about the sun shining and three birds singing outside on 

his doorstep.  The birds are singing a message that is telling him and the listener not to 

worry, that everything is going to be alright.  Songs such as this one bring people closer 

to the things that matter most, allowing the troubles in their lives to fade into the 

                                                

26

 www.bobmarley.com 



27

 http://www.lyricsearch.net 



 

16 


background.  In Trenchtown, drugs and alcohol are used excessively due to the 

depression that results from the impoverished lives lived in this slum. Songs such as 



Three Little Birds help sooth the pain oppressed people endure daily. 

 

Through the music Bob Marley writes and the references he makes on the 



lifestyles in places such as Trenchtown and impoverished areas of the world, people who 

have little influence on the worldly scale are able to send out their cries for help.  His 

lyrics inform people of areas, such as parts of the United States and Europe, where people 

may not know about the horrendous living situations in the places like Trenchtown.  

Marley gives these people a chance to make a difference and possibly act to improve the 

conditions they live in. 

 

Not only did Bob Marley sing about Rasta and the poor social class, but he sang 



about racism and oppression in politics.  Marley lived through many political experiences 

while growing up in the political war grounds of Trenchtown.   

In the song Concrete Jungle

28

No sun will shine in my day today; (no sun will shine) 



The high yellow moon won't come out to play: 

(that high yellow moon won't come out to play) 

I said (darkness) darkness has covered my light, 

(and the stage) and the stage my day into night, yeah. 

Where is the love to be found? (oo-ooh-ooh) 

Won't someone tell me? 

'cause my (sweet life) life must be somewhere to be found - 

(must be somewhere for me) 

Instead of concrete jungle (la la-la!), 

Where the living is harder (la-la!). 

 

 Marley speaks of the surroundings he lives in as 

totally urban and insufficient.   

                                                

28

 Lyrics Freak.  3 May 2007 < http://www.lyricsfreak.com >. 



 

17 


Concrete jungle (la la-la!): 

Man you got to do your (la la-la!) best. wo-ooh, yeah. 

No chains around my feet, 

But i'm not free, oh-ooh! 

I know I am bound here in captivity; 

G'yeah, now - (never, never) I've never known happiness; 

(never, never) I’ve never known what sweet caress is - 

Still, I’ll be always laughing like a clown; 

Won't someone help me? 'cause i (sweet life) - 

I've got to pick myself from off the ground 

(must be somewhere for me), he-yeah! - 

In this a concrete jungle (la la-la!): 

I said, what do you cry for me (la-la!) now, o-oh! 

Concrete jungle (la la-la!), ah, won't you let me be (la la-la!), now. 

Hey! oh, now!

29

 



 

He begins with telling the listener that no sun or moon will shine on him today. Living is 

harder, Marley states in the Concrete Jungle.  Marley tells the listener to do their best to 

keep chains from their feet and to not be bound by the captivity of the Concrete Jungle 

because if you do, you will not know happiness or a sweet life.  This song informs the 

listeners that no matter how bad your surroundings are inside of the political ghettos, you 

can make the best out of it by not letting those politicians bind your mind and will.  If the 

listener wants to be happy, they must make themselves happy and not rely on anyone 

else. 

 

Rebel Music



30

I rebel music; 

I rebel music.) 

Why can't we roam (oh-oh-oh-oh) this open country? (open country) 

Oh, why can't we be what we wanna be? (oh-oh-oh-oh-oh) 

 is a song about the restrictions placed on the poor black people of 

Jamaica and how they were controlled through various laws and statues such as curfews, 

and restrictions of travel about the country.   

                                                

29

 http://www.lyricsfreak.com. 



30

 Marley pp 26.  



 

18 


We want to be free. (wanna be free) 

 

3 o'clock roadblock - curfew, 



And I’ve got to throw away - 

Yes, I’ve got to throw away - 

A yes-a, but I’ve got to throw away 

My little herb stalk! 

 

I (rebel music) - yeah, i'm tellin' you! - 



(i) i rebel music (rebel music). oh-ooh! 

 

Take my soul (oh-oh-oh-oh-oh) 



And suss - and suss me out (suss me out). oh-ooh! 

Check my life (oh-oh-oh-oh-oh), 

If i am in doubt (i'm in doubt); i'm tellin': 

3 o'clock roadblock - roadblock - roadblock, 

And "hey, mr. cop! ain't got no - (hey) hey! (hey, mr cop) - 

(what ya sayin' down there?) - (hey) hey! (hey, mr cop) - 

Ain't got no birth certificate on me now."

31

 



 

Marley begins the song by stating that he is rebel music and questions why the people 

cannot roam the open country at will.  He then goes on to state that he and his people 

want to be free and that they are going to throw away the three o’clock curfew.  The 

tactic of not having a birth certificate made it so that police cannot trace him nor prove 

him to be one of the local people not allowed to travel at will.   

 

So Much Trouble in the World

32

Bless my eyes this morning 



Jah sun is on the rise once again 

The way earthly thin's are goin' 

Anything can happen. 

 

You see men sailing on their ego trip, 



 sends a message just as the title signifies.  The 

world has so much trouble and corruption in it, Jah is the sunlight that keeps Marley 

happy.   

                                                

31

 Marley, pp. 26 



32

 www.lyricsearch.net 



 

19 


Blast off on their spaceship, 

Million miles from reality: 

No care for you, no care for me. 

 

So much trouble in the world; 



So much trouble in the world. 

All you got to do: give a little (give a little), 

Give a little (give a little), give a little (give a little)! 

One more time, ye-ah! (give a little) ye-ah! (give a little) 

Ye-ah! (give a little) yeah! 

 

So you think you've found the solution, 



But it's just another illusion! 

(so before you check out this tide), 

Don't leave another cornerstone 

Standing there behind, eh-eh-eh-eh! 

We've got to face the day; 

(ooh) ooh-wee, come what may: 

We the street people talkin', 

Yeah, we the people strugglin'. 

 

Now they sitting on a time bomb; (bomb-bomb-bomb! bomb-bomb-bomb!) 



Now i know the time has come: (bomb-bomb-bomb! bomb-bomb-bomb!) 

What goes on up is coming on down, (bomb-bomb-bomb! bomb-bomb-bomb!) 

Goes around and comes around. (bomb-bomb-bomb! bomb-bomb-bomb!)

33

 



 

Men and sailing far above reality on their ego trips but that is not a care for Marley or the 

listener.  If people just give a little bit of themselves and their time the solution will be 

found and the world will be a better place.  Instead of the people that are suppressed now

the people on the ego trip will be sitting on a time bomb and what goes around comes 

around.  The people that give will be on top and the people that hoard all of the goods and 

money will be the ones suffering.  It is in this song that Marley tells the world that if they 

all come together and give to help their fellow man that they will be a part of a worldly 

change that will benefit everyone and allow the poverty and oppression to end. 

                                                

33

 www.lyricsearch.net 



 

20 


 

Bob Marley sings about topics such as poverty, war, oppression, and religion, 

which are considered unorthodox for the time period. Many other artists of the time that 

also produced music that sent out messages to the public as well as governments 

requesting change and recognition for different groups of people liked Marley.  Some of 

these artists include Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Country Joe McDonald, and Credence 

Clearwater Revival.  All of these groups had popular songs that didn’t create as much 

controversy as Marley. How is it that these artists, including Bob Marley were able to 

produce and successfully sell so many albums?  These artists were able to portray their 

message as a positive change and desirable outcome through the persuasiveness of music 

and lyrics. 

 

The music these artists used varied in the form of genres but artists such as Bob 



Dylan had a popular sound that appealed to massive amounts of young people of the 

1960s and 1970s.  The Beatles, after long establishing their dominance of the music 

industry in England, were able to transport their fame to the United States and continue to 

appeal to one of the largest audiences in the history of popular music.  Country Joe 

McDonald as well as Credence Clearwater Revival, were able to use their more folk style 

sound which also had hints of a rock and roll sound, to bring in audiences from the older 

generations as well as the youth of the United States. 

 

The lyrics these artists used also helped “sugar coat” their messages and make 



them more acceptable. In fact the messages were deep or unorthodox.  Politics and social 

problems are portrayed and led to a greater understanding and acceptance of their music, 



 

21 


ultimately allowing these artists to become extremely popular.  A contemporary of 

Marley, Bob Dylan likewise sang many songs with deeply rooted messages.  In the song 



Everything is Broken

34

 Dylan sings about how every time one looks around the world, 



something is falling or crashing to the ground in ruin.  The message of the song is 

portraying that unless something is done to save the corruption in this world with the 

governments, the world will be destroyed by  its leaders.   Country Joe McDonald also 

does the same in his acoustic – folk song Whoopie We’re All Gonna Die

35

.    The song 



shows how many drafted men felt about going to war because many did not support it 

and so many were dying daily.  This song plays as a satire on the governmental decisions 

of entering the Viet Nam War.  The Credence Clearwater Revival’s song Run Through 

the Jungle,

36

 



Artists from the United States as well as Bob Marley were able to deliver their 

messages of social, political, and religious focus to the general public with great success 

due the lyrics used in their popular music.  Bob Marley was able to speak for the people 

 once again speaks on the Viet Nam War and gives the story of a fighting 

soldier.  This song refers to the officer in charge of the battle group that this singer is in 

as “Satan” and shows the fear and chaos that was involved with being a drafted soldier in 

this war.  The government would not have endorsed the production of such songs, 

however, if these songs didn’t deliver a softer feel. As a result the public accepted these 

messages of protest and made them extremely popular.  Bob Marley did likewise. 

                                                

34

 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT. Bob Dylan.  3 May 2007



35

 Complete Album Lyrics Your Lyrics and Artist Resource.  3 May 2007 



36

ST Lyrics Sountrack Lyrics.  3 May 2007 



 

22 


who had no voice, locally and globally.  With Marley’s development of the Rasta 

religion, he was able to use his experiences from his childhood to deliver insightful 

messages of sadness, change, and opposition in a successful and tasteful manner 

throughout the world.  Bob Marley is one of the main influences of the spread of 

Jamaican culture and Rastafarianism due to the lyrical rhetoric used in his popular music.  

In time, Bob Marley became, for many, an image of Jamaican culture and 

Rastafarianism. 

 


 

23 


Bibliography 

Alleyne, Mike. “White Reggae: Cultural Dilution in the Record Industry.” Popular Music 

and Science vol. 24 issue 1 (Spring 2000). 

 

Barrett, Leonard E, Sr. The Rastafarians: Sounds of Culture Dissonance. Boston: Beacon 



Press, 1988. 

 

-



 

- -. The Rastafari: A Study in Messainic Cultism. Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico: 

University of Puerto Rico, 1968. 

-

 



 

“Bob Marley Biography.” Bob Marley Biography.  22 Feb. 2007 



 

Campbell, Horace. Rasta and Resistance: From Marcus to Garvey to Walter Rodney. 



Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press, 1987. 

 

Chevannes, Barry. Rastafari: Roots and Ideology: Utopianism and Communitarianism. 



Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse Univeristy Press, 1994. 

 

Collingwood, Jeremy. Bob Marley: His Musical Legacy. London: Cassell Illustrated, 



2005. 

 

Complete Album Lyrics Your Lyrics and Artist Resource.  3 May 2007 



 

Davis, Stephen, and Peter Simon. Reggae Bloodlines: In Search of the Music and Culture 



of Jamiaca. New York: Da Campo Press, 1992. 

 

Dawes, Kwame. Bob Marley: Lyrical Genius. London: Sanctuary Publishing Limited, 



2003. 

 

Find your favorite song lyrics! Search over 100,000 songs!  3 May 2007 



 

Gallardo, Angelica. “Get up, Stand up.” Peace Review vol.15 issue 2 (June 2003). 



 

Gilmore, Mikal. “The Life and Times of Bob Marley: How He Changed the World.” 

Rolling Stone 10 Mar. 2005: 25-30. 

 

Gilroy, Paul. “Could You Be Loved? Bob Marley, Anti-Politics and Universal 



Sufferation.” Critical Quarterly 47.1/2 (Spring 2005): 226-245.  

 

“His Life and Legacy.” Bob Marley’s Official Website. Winter 2007. The Family of 



Robert Nesta Marley.  22 Feb. 2007

 


 

24 


Hodges, Hugh. “Walk Good: West Indian Oratorical Traditions in Bob Marley’s 

Uprising.” Journal of Commonwealth Literature vol. 40 issue 2 (2005).  

 

Hoon, Ruchira. “Celebrations for Marley’s 60th Birthday in Ethiopia.” New York 



Amsterdam News vol. 96 issue 8 (Feb. 2005). 

 

King, Stephen A. “Bob Marley’s ‘Redemption Song’: The Rhetoric of Reggae and 



Rostafari.” Journal of Popular Culture 29.3 (Winter 1995).  

 

-



 

- -. “No Problem, Mon’: Strategies Used to Promote Reggae Music as Jamaica’s 

Cultural Heritage.” journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing vol.8 issue 

4 (2001). 

-

 

 



Lewis, William F. Soul Rebels: The Rastafarians. N.p.: Waveland Press, Inc, 1993. 

 

Llosa, Mario Vargas. “’Trench Town Rock.’” American Scholar vol. 71 issue 3 (Summer 



2002).  

 

Lyrics Freak.  3 May 2007



 

Marley, Bob Nesta. The Best of Bob Marley and the Wailers. N.p.: Hal-Leonard, 1995. 

 

Prahlad, Sw. Anand. Reggae Wisdom: Proverbs in Jamaican Music. Jackson, Mississippi: 



University Press of Mississippi, 2001. 

 

SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT. Bob Dylan.  3 May 2007 



 

Stephens, Gregory. On Racial Frontiers: The New Culture of Frederick Douglass, Raph 



Ellison, and Bob Marley. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 

 

ST Lyrics Sountrack Lyrics.  3 May 2007



 

Tracy, James F. “Popular Communication and the Postcolonial Zeitgeist: On 

Reconsidering Rootes Reggae Dub.” Popular Communication vol. 3 issue 1 

(2005). 


 

Walters, Anita M. Race, Class, and Political Symbols: Rastafari and Reggae in Jamiaican 

Politics. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers, 1985. 

 

White, Timothy. Catch A Fire. New York City: Henry Holt Company LLC, 2000.  



 

Document Outline

  • Mark Haner
  • Senior Seminar: Hst 499
  • Readers
  • Copyright © Mark Haner, 2007
  • Gallardo, Angelica. “Get up, Stand up.” Peace Review vol.15 issue 2 (June 2003).
  • Lewis, William F. Soul Rebels: The Rastafarians. N.p.: Waveland Press, Inc, 1993.
  • Llosa, Mario Vargas. “’Trench Town Rock.’” American Scholar vol. 71 issue 3 (Summer 2002).
  • Lyrics Freak.  3 May 2007 .
  • Marley, Bob Nesta. The Best of Bob Marley and the Wailers. N.p.: Hal-Leonard, 1995.
  • ST Lyrics Sountrack Lyrics.  3 May 2007 .


Yüklə 97,81 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə