Bratislava, Slovakia academic writing guide



Yüklə 0,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix20.01.2020
ölçüsü0,54 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

 

 

 



Bratislava, Slovakia 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC WRITING 

GUIDE 

 

 



 

 

2



2

0

0

1

1

0

0

 

 

 

A Step-by-Step Guide to  

Writing Academic Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Anne Whitaker 

September 2009

 

 

Table of Contents 

 

Why Academic Writing ............................................................................ 2 

The Writing Process ................................................................................ 4 

Choosing and Narrowing a Topic ............................................................. 4 

Thinking (Brainstorming)........................................................................ 6 

Doing Research ....................................................................................... 6 

Thesis Statement .................................................................................... 7 

Planning – Basic Outline ......................................................................... 7 

Planning – Taking Notes ......................................................................... 9 

Planning – Detailed Outline ................................................................... 10 

Writing the First Draft ........................................................................... 13 

The Introduction ................................................................................... 13 

Body Paragraphs ................................................................................... 14 

The Conclusion ...................................................................................... 15 

Connection between Ideas .................................................................... 16 

Revising ................................................................................................ 17 

Editing .................................................................................................. 18 

Proofreading ......................................................................................... 19 

Paper Checklist ..................................................................................... 20 

Example Paper ...................................................................................... 21 

Bibliography .......................................................................................... 28 


 



Why Academic Writing 

Academic writing is, essentially, the writing you have to do for your university courses. 

Your instructors may have different names for academic writing assignments (essay, 

paper, research paper, term paper, argumentative paper/essay, analysis paper/essay, 

informative essay, position paper), but all of these assignments have the same goal and 

principles. 

 

Goal of Academic Writing: Why do students have to write papers? 

The truth is that academic papers are a specially-designed torture instrument. They are 

preferred because instructors are not directly involved in the torture. Usually students 

torture themselves by waiting until the last minute to write their papers and by not 

knowing what they are doing. 

 

That's why this guide was written. A paper is not supposed to be torture. Seriously. The 



thing about torture was a joke. An academic writing assignment is supposed to be your 

opportunity to explore something that interests you from your course. You have freedom 

to choose a topic, empty pages on which to express your own ideas, and an audience 

that is interested in reading what you think. 

 

In an academic writing assignment, you will start by asking a good question, then find 



and analyze answers to it, and choose your own best answer(s) to discuss in your paper. 

Your paper will share your thoughts and findings and justify your answer with logic and 

evidence. So the goal of academic writing is not to show off everything that you know 

about your topic, but rather to show that you understand and can think critically about 

your topic (and this is what earns you a good grade). 

 

Plus, you will develop skills in researching, evaluating information, organizing, arguing, 



responding to others’ arguments, analyzing, and expressing yourself clearly in writing (in 

English too). These skills, by the way, are all valued by employers. 

 

10 Principles of Academic Writing 

 

Clear Purpose. The goal of your paper is to answer the question you posed as your 

topic. Your question gives you a purpose. The most common purposes in academic 

writing are to persuade, analyze/synthesize, and inform.  

o  Persuasive purpose – In persuasive academic writing, the purpose is to get 

your readers to adopt your answer to the question. So you will choose one 

answer to your question, support your answer using reason and evidence, and try 

to change the readers’ point of view about the topic. Persuasive writing 

assignments include argumentative and position papers.  

o  Analytical purpose – In analytical academic writing, the purpose is to explain 

and evaluate possible answers to your question, choosing the best answer(s) 

based on your own criteria. Analytical assignments often investigate causes, 

examine effects, evaluate effectiveness, assess ways to solve problems, find the 

relationships between various ideas, or analyze other people’s arguments. The 

“synthesis” part of the purpose comes in when you put together all the parts and 

come up with your own answer to the question. Examples of these assignments 

include analysis papers and critical analyses.  

o  Informative purpose – In informative academic writing, the purpose is to 

explain possible answers to your question, giving the readers new information 

about your topic. This differs from an analytical topic in that you do not push your 

viewpoint on the readers, but rather try to enlarge the readers’ view.  

Some assignments will have a pre-determined purpose (see the examples above); 

for other assignments, you will have to choose a purpose when you choose a topic 


 

(research paper, term paper). And some assignments may have two purposes. In all 



cases, the purpose will be clear at the beginning of your paper, and your paper must 

achieve its purpose in order to be successful. 

 

 

Audience Engagement. As with all writing, academic writing is directed to a specific 



audience in mind. Unless your instructor says otherwise, consider your audience to 

be fellow students with the same level of knowledge as yourself. As students in the 

field, they are interested in your topic, but perhaps not so interested in reading a 

paper. So you will have to engage them with your ideas and catch their interest with 

your writing style. Imagine that they are also skeptical, so that you must use the 

appropriate reasoning and evidence to convince them of your ideas.  

 

 

Clear Point of ViewAcademic writing, even that with an informative purpose, is 



not just a list of facts or summaries of sources. Although you will present other 

people’s ideas and research, the goal of your paper is to show what you think about 

these things. Your paper will have and support your own original idea about the 

topic. This is called the thesis statement, and it is your answer to the question.  

 

 

Single Focus. Every paragraph (even every sentence) in your paper will support 



your thesis statement. There will be no unnecessary, irrelevant, unimportant, or 

contradictory information (Your paper will likely include contradictory or alternative 

points of view, but you will respond to and critique them to further strengthen your 

own point of view).  

 

 

Logical OrganizationAcademic writing follows a standard organizational pattern. 



For academic essays and papers, there is an introduction, body, and conclusion. Each 

paragraph logically leads to the next one.  

o  The introduction catches the readers’ attention, provides background 

information, and lets the reader know what to expect. It also has the thesis 

statement. 

o  The body paragraphs support the thesis statement. Each body paragraph has 

one main point to support the thesis, which is named in a topic sentence. Each 

point is then supported in the paragraph with logical reasoning and evidence. 

Each sentence connects to the one before and after it. The readers do not have to 

work to find the connection between ideas. 

o  The conclusion summarizes the paper’s thesis and main points and shows the 

reader the significance of the paper’s findings. 

   

 

Strong SupportEach body paragraph will have sufficient and relevant support for 



the topic sentence and thesis statement.  This support will consist of facts, examples, 

description, personal experience, and expert opinions and quotations.  

 

 

Clear and Complete ExplanationsThis is very important! As the writer, you need 



to do all the work for the reader. The reader should not have to think hard to 

understand your ideas, logic, or organization. English readers expect everything to be 

done for them; your thoughts and thought processes should be clearly and 

completely explained. 

 

 

Effective Use of ResearchYour paper should refer to a variety of current, high-



quality, professional and academic sources. You will use your research to support 

your own ideas; therefore, it must be integrated into your writing and not presented 

separately. That means that source material will be introduced, analyzed, explained, 

and then cited. Research and APA Style Guide 2010 covers this topic in depth. 

 

 

Correct APA StyleAll academic papers should follow the guidelines of the American 



Psychological Association as found in Research and APA Style Guide 2010, regarding 

 

in-text citations, the reference list, and format. 



 

 

Writing Style. Because this is your work, you should use your own words whenever 

possible. Do not try to write like a boring, overly formal scholarly article. Use the 

natural conversational style that you would use in the classroom. Your writing should 

be clear, concise, and easy to read. It is also very important that there are no 

grammar, spelling, punctuation, or vocabulary mistakes in academic writing. Errors 

convey to the reader that you do not care. 

 

And finally, this rule will override all the principles: 



 

ALWAYS FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS OF YOUR INSTRUCTOR. Every instructor 

has a reason for giving you an assignment, and each instructor's requirements may 

differ. Follow your instructor’s directions to get the most from an assignment. 

 

The Writing Process 

You’ve just received your first academic writing assignment. What do you do? If you are 

a beginning writer, take it step by step. The following writing process has worked for 

millions of university students. 

 

Choose a topic.  

 

Think (brainstorm).  

 

Research.  

 

Discover your thesis.  

 

Plan (outline).



 

 

Write.  

 

Revise.  

 

Edit.  

 

Proofread.  

 

This guide will go through each of these steps with you. Beginning writers should follow 



this process. However, as you become more experienced, you may find that a different 

order works best for you. That is OK. You will also find that you have to do some steps 

more than once; for example, you may do research before you choose a topic, as you 

outline, and as you revise. You will certainly need to revise your paper several times 

before doing the final proofreading. And of course, you should never stop thinking.

  

 



Choosing and Narrowing a Topic 

Sometimes your instructor will give you a list of possible questions or themes, and other 

times you will have the freedom to choose your own topic. Sometimes the assignment 

will have a specific purpose (argumentative essay, analysis paper), and other times you 

will have the freedom to determine the purpose (research paper, term paper). This 

freedom can be both great and terrifying. If you have trouble choosing what to write 

about, start with a few ideas and choose the best one after several steps. You can also 

consult with your instructor about the best topic choice. 

 

How to Choose a Topic 

Think about things related to the course that you are interested in. If there is nothing 

which interests you, look through the textbook, instructor-recommended resources, 

course slides, handouts, and current periodicals for possible ideas. 



 

 



Then you need to narrow your ideas from subjects to topics. A subject is a broad 

concept: conflict management, abortion, the Cold War, capital budgeting, organizational 

culture, global warming, Toyota’s management style, and EU agricultural subsidies are a 

few examples. These are not paper topics; these could all be the subjects of books.  

 

Narrow a subject by looking at its smaller parts, or by choosing a specific problem, time 



period, or place to cover. You may need to do a little general research here if you do not 

know much about the subject. Also asking yourself “Who? What? Where? When? Why? 

and How?” questions about the subject can help you limit the subject and determine 

your interests.  

 

Doing this with abortion, for example, leads to topics like the reasons American women 



choose abortion rather than adoption, the psychological effects of previous abortions on 

women who become pregnant again, the consequences of Poland’s ban on abortions on 

Polish women’s lives, solutions to ending the practice of using abortion as a tool for 

gender selection in India, and whether or not the morning after pill should be sold to 

girls under 16. From here, choose a topic which fits the prescribed purpose of your paper 

(if there is one). 

 

Specific topics like these are much more likely to fit the goal of academic writing and to 



fit the number of pages allowed in your paper. 

  

Writing your Topic as a Question 

Once you have a specific topic for your paper, write your topic as the question which 

your paper will answer. Doing this is a great way to focus your paper and ensure that 

you meet the paper’s purpose. In fact, your purpose will determine the type of question 

that you ask.  

 

For example, an argumentative paper would probably have a yes/no question, such as 



“Should the U.S. have used the atomic bomb in World War II?” or “Should the morning 

after pill be sold to girls under 16?” or “Should animal organs be used for human 

transplants?” or “Which is a better strategy for the EU to follow to encourage change in 

Burma – engagement or isolation?” And then, of course, your paper would argue for 

your answer to the question.  

 

An analytical paper most likely has a why/how question, such as “Why has childhood 



obesity been increasing in the United States?” or “How has Poland’s ban on abortions 

affected women’s lives?” or “How effective is the article in supporting the author’s 

thesis?” or “How could the EU best reform its agricultural subsidies?” And then, of 

course, your paper will analyze the various answers, justifying your point of view to the 

audience. 

 

An informative paper often has a what/why/how question, such as “What are the 



negative aspects of wind energy?” or “What are the causes of anorexia in teenage boys?” 

or “How can managers evaluate whether to invest money in a software upgrade 

project?” And then, of course, your paper will explain the various answers, giving the 

readers a new way of looking at the topic. 

 

Characteristics of a Good Paper Topic 

 

Your question does not have a simple answer. A good question has several 

alternative answers, or no accepted answer, or maybe an easy but unsatisfactory 

answer. In other words, there is no one “right” answer to your question. Your paper 

will give and justify your own best answer(s), and it will require research and critical 

thinking to do this. 

 


 

 



Your question is worth answering. The readers will care about the answer to your 

question. Your answer will have some significance. 

 

 

Your paper will achieve its purpose. Will your informative paper truly give your 



readers a new perspective? Will your readers accept your analysis in your analytical 

paper? Will your persuasive paper succeed in changing your readers’ view?  

This is especially important to consider with persuasive paper topics. Avoid topics in 

which arguments are mostly based on (usually unchanging) personal beliefs, rather 

than reason and evidence. Whether abortion should be legalized is such a topic.  

 

 



You are interested in the topic. You will spend a lot of time with this topic, so 

choose something that will not bore or torture you. 



 

 

The topic is the right size for the length of the paper. Make sure you will not 

have too little or too much to say for the number of pages allowed. 

 

 

There is enough (but not too much) information available in reliable 



sources. If you find too much information, you will need to narrow your topic 

further; if you find too little information, you should widen your topic. 



 

 

You have enough time to do what you need to do. How much time do you have 

before the due date? You may have to limit the complexity of your topic if you have 

waited too long to start…. 



 

Thinking (Brainstorming) 

When you have a topic, start brainstorming. Write down all the possible answers to your 

question, and write down all the information, opinions, and questions you have about 

your topic. Brainstorming will help you see what you already know, what you think, what 

you think you know, and what else you need to find out about your topic. Writing things 

down also ensures that you will not forget your great ideas later. (Although this is a 

really short section, it is a very important step!) 

 

Doing Research 

Doing research is covered on pp. 3-12 of the Research and APA Style Guide. Read them! 

 

What you must remember is that “doing good research takes time.” Do not expect to do 



research once and find everything that you need for your paper. Research is an on-going 

part of the writing process. You will start now, doing general research to learn more 

about your topic, but you will continue doing research throughout the writing process, as 

you discover a thesis, make a basic outline and then a detailed outline, write your paper, 

and revise your paper. Also, do not be afraid to change your topic a little (or a lot) if 

your research leads you in a different direction. 

 

To make research more effective and less time-consuming, you can do three things: 



 

Plan your research before your start, using the research guide’s tips (pp. 3-4).  

 

 



Set up and follow a research schedule. Give yourself a set amount of time to do 

your preliminary research. Start working on your paper, and go back to researching 

later when you know exactly what you need to find. 

 

 



Immediately record source information. Write down the address or bookmark 

the web page of every good source, even if you are not sure if you will use it…you 

may want to later. 


 



 



Thesis Statement 

The thesis statement is the most important sentence in your paper. If someone asked 

you, “What does your paper say?” your answer would be your thesis statement. 

Everything you write will support this statement.  

A good thesis statement usually includes 

 

Main idea of the paper. ONE idea. The entire paper is based on this statement.  

 

 

Your opinion or point of view. The thesis statement is not a fact nor a question, 



but your view of the topic and what you want to say about it. 

 

 



Purpose of the paper. From the thesis, it should be clear what the paper will do. 

 

 



Yüklə 0,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə