British Orthopaedic Association



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British

Orthopaedic

Association




AFFIX PATIENT DETAIL STICKER NHS Organisation………………….

HERE


Attending Consultant……………….

Forename…………………………..

Job Title……………………………

Surname……………………………


Hospital Number…………………...
D.O.B…../……./……




OPERATION: Correction of bunion/ hallux valgus repair
………………. Big Toe

specifics -


PROCEDURE: you may have noticed that your big toe (and possibly other toes) is pointing outwards – this is called a Hallux valgus. A bunion is the part of the big toe wish protrudes (sticks) inwards.
The big toe may even be turned, pushing outwards and be rubbing against the shoe or another toe. This can be painful and you may have come to a joint decision with your surgeon to have the deformity corrected by an operation.
Most of these types of operations can be done as a day case, meaning you may be able to leave the same day. You will be seen the day of the operation by the surgeon or one of the team. The surgeon will mark (draw with a felt pen) your bad foot. This is to make sure the correct foot is operated on. If you have any questions, now is a good time to ask them.
An anaesthetic will be administered in theatre. This may be a general anaesthetic (where you will be asleep) or a local block (e.g. where you are awake but the area to be operated is completely numbed) such as an injection in the spine. You must discuss this and the risks with the anaesthetist.
A tight inflatable band (tourniquet) may be wrapped around your thigh to limit the amount of bleeding.
The surgeon will usually make an incision (cut) overlying the part of the foot that is deformed – the bunion. There are many different types of operation that can be performed, but most involve trying to restore the alignment (straightness) and correcting any rotation by removing “wedges” of bone and tightening the ligaments over the joint. The surgeon may also decide to use wires, screws or a plate to hold the bone while it sets.
Because there are so many different variations of the operation, we have drawn a “standard” deformed foot (at the end of the form). Your surgeon may wish to draw exactly what they plan to do – other surgeons and patients find this too confusing so may decide not to.

When all is complete, the surgeon will close the skin. This is usually done by a stitch under the skin which dissolves – but each surgeon has their own preference.


The foot is usually placed in a special bandage with a “J-shaped” plaster around the toe. Others may decide to place the whole foot in a plaster or heavy bandage.
In most cases, you will be asked to keep this bandage or plaster on for the first two weeks and flat foot or heel walk. Some may ask you to non-weight-bear for the first fortnight. You should check with your surgeon.
After a fortnight, the surgeon will invite you back for a wound check.
Nb if at the time of the op. the bunion or any part of the foot looks inflamed or infected at the time of the operation, it is sensible to defer/ delay until the signs have improved.
***Please be aware that a surgeon other the consultant, but with appropriate training or supervision may perform the procedure***

ALTERNATIVE PROCEDURE: All bunions can be left without any operation worsening symptoms such as pain, infections and inflammation are reasons for operation. Wearing large wide toed, flat shoes can often decrease symptoms.
There are numerous operative procedures that can be performed. The one suggested by your surgeon may be the most appropriate for your case or the surgeons preferred technique. You can of course seek another opinion.
RISKS

As with all procedures, this carries some risks and complications.



COMMON (1-5%)

Pain: the procedure does involve moving soft tissue and will hurt afterwards.

It is important to discuss this with the staff and ask for pain killers if

needed.

Bleeding: there will inevitably be some bleeding.

Scar: the operation will leave a thin scar on the side (or top) of the big toe.

Joint stiffness: this may occur after the operation and although not painful, may mean

that the bend at the toe is less.



Laxity at the toe: the operation may damage the ligaments and tendons of the joint

making the toe joint unstable.



RARE (<1%)

Infection: This is may present as redness, discharge or temperature around the

flap or donor site. A course of antibiotics be necessary once the source

has been isolated. If there were any wires inserted or other metal

work these may need to be removed sooner.



Delayed bony union: despite fixation, the bones sometimes do not join properly. A

second operation may be necessary.



Thick/ keloid scar: These are scars which grow excessively (within the wound margin

and beyond respectively).



Delayed wound healing: may occur if the wound is under tension, infected or short of

blood supply.



Recurrent deformity: The deformity may return despite the fixation.

Fracture: during the operation, the bones are “broken” (an osteotomy) and then

repositioned. As they start to heal, they are weak and may re-break

(fracture). This can be painful and may require another operation.


Confirmation of consent :

The doctor has explained the above complications, risks and alternative treatments to me as well as not having the procedure.

I hereby give my consent for the above procedure
Signature………………………………………………….
Print name………………………………………………………....
Date………./…/20…
2nd Confirmation………………...............…… .Date…………./…..20….

I also give consent for my notes and data to be used in any studies and trials in the future


Signature………………………………………….…Date………………

NAME of SURGEON (Capital letters)………………………………..

SIGNATURE of SURGEON………………………………………….

POSITION……………………………………………………………..



SIGNATURE of SURGEON………………………………………….



POSITION……………………………………………………………..



If you have any complaints about your treatment or your care, you are always encouraged to discuss them with your surgical team.
However, if you wish to complain to the trust, each hospital will have a PALS or Patient Advise and Liaison Service. The head nurse on the ward or out patients’ clinic can direct you to them. The PALS team will treat all complaints seriously.




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