Brushwood in Western Australia: Industry Development Plan 2008



Yüklə 4,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü4,38 Mb.
  1   2   3

Brushwood in Western Australia: 

Industry Development Plan 2008 

Produced for the Southern Brook Landcare Group, Western 

Australia, funded by the Wheatbelt Development Commission. 

Dr Frank McKinnell 

November 2008


2

 

Table of Contents 



Executive Summary...............................................................................................................................3 

Introduction..............................................................................................................................................4 

Description of the industry in Western Australia.............................................................................. 5 

Potential environmental and economic benefits................................................................................ 6 

Brushwood in Commerce...................................................................................................................7 

Range of products............................................................................................................................................... 7 

Structure of the industry in other States................................................................................................ 7 

Market demand for Brushwood Products..................................................................................8 

In Western Australia ......................................................................................................................................... 8 

Other States/overseas...................................................................................................................................... 9 

Marketing Brushwood from Western Australia .............................................................................. 10 

Interstate/overseas markets ..................................................................................................................... 11 

Commercial Potential of WA Brushwood Species ............................................................... 12 

Brushwood .......................................................................................................................................................... 12 

Species Selection......................................................................................................................................... 12 

Quality Standards....................................................................................................................................... 13 

By‐ products such as oil................................................................................................................................ 14 

Resources of Brushwood in WA................................................................................................... 16 

Location of current plantings .................................................................................................................... 16 

Estimated resource availability................................................................................................................ 17 

Northern region .......................................................................................................................................... 18 

Avon Valley .................................................................................................................................................... 18 

Southern region........................................................................................................................................... 19 

MIS Resource................................................................................................................................................ 20 

Matching the Resource to Industrial Development ....................................................................... 22 

Factory Size ................................................................................................................................................... 22 

Resource Supply.......................................................................................................................................... 22 

Growing Brushwood.......................................................................................................................... 24 

Species planted..................................................................................................................................... 24 

Plantation Management ............................................................................................................................... 24 

Research and Development........................................................................................................................ 26 

The Way Forward for Growers..................................................................................................... 27 

References .............................................................................................................................................. 28 

Acknowledgements............................................................................................................................ 28 

Appendices ............................................................................................................................................. 28 

All photographs by Frank McKinnell unless otherwise acknowledged.



3

 

Executive Summary 

This plan has been developed for the Southern Brook Landcare Group to promote the 

successful development of an industry in the Wheatbelt of Western Australia based on 

the  cultivation  of  Melaleuca  species,  known  commonly  as  Brushwood,  for 

commercial  purposes.  There  is  growing  interest  among  Wheatbelt  farmers  in 

establishing  plantations  of  Melaleuca  partly  as  a  way  of  more  efficiently  using  the 

land, and partly for riparian zone management and lowering groundwater tables. If a 

commercial use can be found for the Brushwood it will encourage its use for landcare 

purposes. 

About 90% of the Australian Brushwood resource occurs in natural stands, but there 

is pressure to reduce harvesting them, which presents an opportunity  for growers of 

Brushwood plantations, provided they can produce a marketable product. 

The main commercial use of Brushwood is the manufacture of brushwood fencing or 

cladding, although there is some potential for development of a new industry based on 

extraction  of  oil  from  the  foliage.  The  Western  Australian  market  for  Brushwood 

fencing is about 25,000 metres a year, about 2/3 of which is supplied from the Eastern 

States.  There  is  one  local  fence  factory.  There  appear  to  be  good  prospects  for 

expanding  the  local  market  to  about  twice  the  current  level.  In  addition,  there  are 

good prospects for international exports of fence panels as well as interstate trade in 

unprocessed Brushwood. 

This  plan  surveys  the  potential  market  for  Wheatbelt  Brushwood  growers,  and 

concludes  that  there  is  scope  for  a  brushwood  fencing/cladding  factory  based  on  a 

single  machine  in  2009,  and  two  machines  in  2010.  From  data  on  plantation  areas 

supplied  by  growers  it  makes  estimates  of  likely  levels  of  production,  based  on 

different scenarios, over the period 2009­2014. In order to ensure an adequate level of 

supply to a factory it will be necessary to combine both private grower resources and 

that  managed  by  a  MIS  company,  at  least  until  2013.  After  that  time  a  very  large 

private grower plantation Brushwood resource comes on stream. 

In the short term, a Brushwood plantation estate of about 1000 ha seems appropriate 

to support  a local  fence panel  factory, but as the international  and  interstate markets 

develop, the eventual area could be at least three times this amount. As plantations are 

variable  in  form  and  vigour,  the  plan  presents  a  proposed  industry  standard  for 

assessing the marketability of a plantation. 

There  are  still  many  unresolved  issues  in  connection  with  Brushwood  plantation 

management that need ongoing research and development.  In view of the variation in 

form  and  growth  habit  of  Western  Australian Brushwood species,  identification  and 

propagation of genotypes that have desirable characteristics for brushwood production 

is paramount. The plan lists the main issues requiring research, and provides a guide 

to the way forward for growers to develop a sustainable and commercially successful 

industry.



4

 

Introduction 

This Plan has been developed to promote the successful development of an industry in 

the  Wheatbelt  zone  of  Western  Australia  based  on  the  cultivation  of  Melaleuca 

species for commercial purposes. There is growing interest among Wheatbelt farmers 

in establishing plantations of Melaleuca partly as a way of more efficiently using the 

land, and partly for riparian zone management and lowering groundwater tables. 

There  is  an  old­established  industry  in  NSW,  Victoria  and  South  Australia  utilising 

Melaleuca for the manufacture of decorative fencing products, known as brushwood. 

The  species  used  in  that  case  is  known  as  M.uncinata  and  the  common  name  is 

Brushwood. In NSW the Brushwood is harvested when about 1.5 m in height and as 

the species readily resprouts, it is harvested again about every 6­10 years, depending 

on the site. 

Figure 1. A good quality brushwood fence 

Photograph by Monica Durcan (AVONGRO) 

The same species occurs over a wide area in the south west of the continent, but while 

the  eastern  occurrences  appear  to  be  relatively  uniform,  a  recent  reclassification  of 

M.uncinata in Western Australia has subdivided it into eleven distinct species which 

differ  significantly  in  their  potential  for  commercial  development  (Craven,  Lepschi, 

Broadhurst and Byrne, 2004). All are collectively known as Brushwood. 

Other  Melaleuca  species  are  utilised  for  the  extraction  of  oil  from  the  foliage  in 

Queensland.  Known  as  tea tree oil,  this  is  well  established  in  the  market  place  and


comes mainly from M.alternifolia. So far, none of the Western Australian species of 

Melaleuca have been used for oil extraction. 

The possible development of commercial oil or brushwood fencing products from the 

Western Australian species of Melaleuca are the subject of this industry development 

plan.


 

Description of the industry in Western Australia 

Plantations  of  Melaleuca  species  have  been  established  in  Western  Australia  since 

about  2000  by  farmers  in  the  Avon  Valley  and  in  the  Northern  and  Southern 

Agricultural Zones. There is also one plantation established by a Managed Investment 

Company  (MIS)  near  Meckering,  east  of  Northam.  Apart  from  the  MIS  plantation 

(Rewards,  2001),  these  plantations  are  mainly  small  scale,  the  number  of  plants 

supplied at each site being from 3,000 to 150,000, with an average of about 30,000. A 

more complete account of existing Brushwood plantation resources is given below. 

Melaleuca growing naturally on private  land  in the eastern  Wheatbelt  in  WA  is also 

harvested, and manufactured into brushwood panels by a local company. It is unclear 

what species in involved in this case, nor how sustainable the current level of harvest 

is,  but  it  supplies  a  significant  proportion  of  the  local  market  for  panels.  In  the  past 

some  Brushwood  has  also  been  harvested  under  licence  from  Crown  Lands  but  this 

has  now  ceased  due  to  restrictions  on  commercial  activities  by  the  Department  of 

Environment and Conservation. 

Figure 2. A 6­year old plantation of M.atroviridis



6

 

Potential environmental and economic benefits 

Recent publications (Robinson and Emmott, 2005, Avongro, 2007) that focus on the 

potential of Brushwood to alleviate salinity problems by lowering groundwater levels 

refer to the tolerance of some species or provenances to the early stages (barley grass) 

of salinisation. There are no data as yet to show that species or provenances that meet 

the standard required for brushwood panel manufacture, and also display good growth 

rates,  are  effective  in  this  regard.  Definitive  data  on  this  point  should  be  gathered 

before  making  too  much  of  this  aspect  of  growing  Brushwood on  agricultural  land. 

According to Robinson and Emmott, the local species have different site preferences, 

so  it  may  be  necessary  for  a  grower  to  decide  whether  the  objective  is  to  grow  a 

commercial Brushwood crop or to grow the species as a landcare measure, without an 

intention  to  use  it  as  a  commercial  crop,  and  select  the  species  or  provenance 

accordingly. 

There are other  potential  values  from establishing  Brushwood plantations. Craven et 



al have referred to the possible association of some  Melaleuca species with the rare 

Western Australian underground orchid, Rhizanthella gardneri, and speculate that the 

orchid  grows  with  M.scalena,  M.hamata  and  M.uncinata.  Thus,  there  could 

potentially be some nature conservation value from new plantations of these species. 

This will not, however, be of benefit to farmers, and may even be a disbenefit if the 

Department of Environment and Conservation imposes restrictions on land use under 

the Wildlife Conservation Act if the orchid is subsequently found in a plantation. 

If  the  use  of  biomass  for  energy  production  becomes  established  in  the  Wheatbelt, 

based initially on the woody residue from oil mallee plantations, then there could well 

be  a  market  for  Brushwood  as  biomass  at  some  time  in  the  future.  While  such  a 

market is likely to be very cost­sensitive, i.e., rely on a low cost raw material, it may 

well be an attractive proposition for growers located close to the processing plant, or 

for the utilisation of plantations that do not meet the quality standards  necessary  for 

brushwood panel manufacture.



7

 

Brushwood in Commerce 

Range of products 

Brushwood  fencing  products  have  been  sold  in  Western  Australia,  mainly  in  the 

metropolitan area, for many years. Approximately one third of the supply comes from 

a  factory  in South Australia,  one third  from Victoria and the remainder  from a  local 

manufacturer. 

The  industry  developed  largely  in  South  Australia  but  has  extended  in  the  last  40 

years to NSW and Victoria. Initially it was based on hand­made fences, and this still 

occurs  in  both  South  Australia  and  NSW,  but  machine  made  panels  are  the  largest 

sector of the industry. Brushwood panels dominate the WA market. 

The main products are brushwood fencing, which is 50 mm in thickness and normally 

comes in 2.2 x 1.8 m panels, and brushwood cladding, which is 30 mm  in thickness 

and is used to line fences made of other materials. Relatively small amounts are used 

for thatch roofing on gazebos and similar structures. In the latter case, hand thatching 

is often used, although other imported products are now coming onto the market.



 

Structure of the industry in other States 

In  the  Eastern  States  the  brushwood  industry  draws  resources  from  natural  stands 

occurring  on  either  private  property  or  Crown  land.  In  Victoria,  the  harvest  of 

Brushwood from Crown  land  has  been reduced,  but still takes place to some extent. 

Much of the Victorian supply is sourced from NSW. In NSW, it takes place on both 

private  property  and  on  Crown  land,  under  licence  from  State  Forests  NSW 

(Broombush Industry Group, 2004). There is an expectation in NSW that the harvest 

from  Crown  land  will  eventually  be  phased  out.  In  South  Australia,  the  harvest  of 

Brushwood is virtually all from private land. 

Harvesting in the Eastern States is mainly carried out by hand cutting the plants. Their 

scattered  distribution  in  natural  stands  does  not  lend  itself  to  easy  mechanisation  of 

the  process.  Plantations  would  have  a  clear  advantage  in  this  respect,  being  ideally 

suited to mechanical  harvesting.  A Brushwood plantation  harvester  is  likely to be a 

specialised type of machine and it is probable that one such machine would satisfy all 

harvesting requirements in Western Australia. 

In  NSW  and  Victoria,  the  Brushwood  is  harvested  by  independent  contractors  who 

deliver  the  material  to  the  market  in  bundles.  In  NSW,  at  least,  the  standard  sized 

bundle    (22  kg)  is  the  basis  of  sales  by  the  contractor  (Broombush  Industry  Group, 

2004). In  Western  Australia  the  local  processor  employs  a  contractor  directly  to  cut 

and deliver in larger bundles of about 50 kg each. 

In the Eastern States, there  is still a significant proportion of the brushwood fencing 

constructed by  hand packing on site,  and these operators obtain their  supplies direct 

from harvesting contractors.


8

 

Market demand for Brushwood Products 

The main use for brushwood products is for fencing, or fence cladding, but there are 

also small niche markets for items such as gazebos, garden furniture and shade houses 

(McKelvie, Bills and Peat, 1994).



 

In Western Australia 

Assessing current market demand for brushwood in Western Australia is difficult, as 

there  are  two  products  involved.  The  2.2  m  x  1.8  m  x  50  mm  panels  are  used  for 

decorative fencing in higher priced homes and by land developers to attract buyers to 

new housing subdivisions. The other product is also in 2.2 x 1.8 m panels, but is only 

30 mm in thickness, being referred to as cladding. It is used to conceal unsightly fibre 

cement  or  steel  panel  fences  in  landscaped  outdoor  areas.  This  appears  to  be  a 

booming market, more so in Western Australia than in other States. 

It was not possible to obtain accurate data on Western Australian sales of brushwood 

fences, as some of the three main providers regarded this information as confidential, 

nor  was  it  possible  to  obtain  data  on  the  relative  size  of  the  fencing  and  cladding 

markets.  However,  by  piecing  together  direct  and  indirect  information  from  various 

sources, including all three local suppliers, a best estimate of the current market size 

for  fencing  was  developed.  The  figure  of  25,000  metres/year  of  brushwood  fence 

panel should be regarded as tentative only. 

While  the  main  market  for  fencing  is  the  in  the  upper  economic  range  of  home 

development  or  improvement,  which  is  relatively  insensitive  to  fluctuations  in  the 

State’s economy, the developer market appears quite sensitive to the overall economy. 

However,  discussions  with  several  of  the  major  developer  companies  in  Perth 

revealed  that  several  had  never  contemplated  using  brushwood  fencing,  so  some 

careful marketing may well expand this sector of the market. 

Discussions  with  local  suppliers  of  brushwood  products  revealed  a  high  level  of 

confidence that the market for brushwood products is expanding.  A local factory that 

avoids the cost of bringing supplies from the Eastern States would offer the potential 

to  lower  prices  to  compete  more  aggressively  with  other  fencing  products  and  so 

expand the market. 

Two of the suppliers  felt that if costs could  be  lowered sufficiently  it would expand 

the  market to  a  significant  extent.  There  is  some  evidence  from  Sydney  that  raising 

the price has a definite adverse effect of sales (Broombush Industry Group, 2004). 

Another  key  factor  in  expanding  the  market  was  believed  to  be  finding  a  way  of 

accessing the do­it­yourself (DIY) sector through a large supermarket chain. A walk 

through a hardware supermarket will reveal that there is a DIY market for brushwood 

products, but it is currently filled by cheap and low quality imports. Further attention 

to  cost  cutting  and  product  development  (perhaps  a thinner  product than  the  current 

brushwood  cladding)  may  well  open  up  new  markets.  A  local  brushwood 

manufacturer  might  well  be  able  to  be  more  flexible  and  innovative  in  product 

development, compared with more settled market avenues in other States.


Price  of  brushwood  compared  with  alternative  fencing  products  is  obviously  an 

important issue. Quotations for the main alternative products available in Perth were 

obtained from trade sources as follows: 

Colorbond steel panels 

$40/m 


Pinelap (palings, rails, capping and posts) 

$41/m 


Hardifence (panels and capping) 

$45/m 


Erection costs are additional  in each case.  Although  costs vary  between contractors, 

and  between  individual  sites,  they  are  comparable  for  each  of  these  products. 

Hardifence,  however,  has  the  advantage  of  being  a  DIY  operation.  Against  these 

figures the advertised price in Perth for brushwood is about $90/m. Despite this price 

difference, it is apparent that there is a demand for a fence product that has superior 

appearance to any of the above,  although  it will always  be a small proportion of the 

total fencing market.

 

Other States/overseas 

There has been little published on market trends in brushwood in Australia in recent 

years.  In  1994,  the  Australian  Bureau  of  Agricultural  Research  and  Extension 

(McKelvie et al, 1994) carried out a survey of the industry and estimated that the total 

brushwood  market  in  Australia  at  that  time  was  600,000  bundles  a  year.  ABARE 

summarised the market prospects for brushwood nationally as “steady market growth 

possible in the medium term”. Given the higher than average growth rate in Western 

Australia,  which  is  expected  to  continue  for  the  next  15­20  years,  the  outlook  for 

brushwood products is likely to be more optimistic than this. Indeed discussions with 

one  local  supplier  indicated  an  expectation  that  his  market  in  Perth  could  double  in 

the next two years. 

The  ABARE  report  was  pessimistic  about  the  possibility  of  overseas  markets 

developing  for  brushwood,  yet  at  least  one  Eastern  States  manufacturer  has  been 

exporting brushwood panels to the USA in recent years. The proximity of Fremantle 

to  Asian  and  Middle  East  markets  may  well  present  an  opportunity  to  develop  an 

export market in that direction as living standards in the region continue to rise. One 

manufacturer  stated that he  is currently  exporting small quantities to Thailand, New 

Zealand  and  the  USA,  but  cannot  satisfy  demand  due  to  Brushwood  resource 

difficulties. 

We can  make an estimate of  how a  Brushwood market of the size seen  by  ABARE 

translates into metres of standard 2.2 m brushwood fence panels as follows: 

The bundles are assumed to be the standard 22 kg weight green. 

Each  bundle  loses  30%  of  its  weight  in  drying  during  storage  and  processing 

(C.Bowman,  pers.comm.).  The  dry  weight  of  each  bundle  is  therefore  70%  x  22  = 

15.4 kg. 

600,000 bundles can therefore produce 600,000 x 15.4 kg of fence = 9.24 million kg 

of fence. 

Each  fence  panel  received  in  Western  Australia  weighs  75  kg  (Shane  Davey,  pers. 

comm.), or 34.1 kg/m, so the length of fence produced in Australia is potentially 9.24 

million  /  34.1  =  271,000  m,  based  on  the  ABARE  1994  figures.  This  would  be  the



10 

case if all the production were directed to the 50 mm thick standard panels. We know 

that some  is directed  into cladding,  but we do not know the proportion.  We also do 

not know, of course, how accurate that estimate was, nor how the figure has changed 

in recent years. However, in view of the growth in population and GDP in the last 14 

years since the ABARE paper, it would not be unreasonable to assume that the overall 

Australian market has increased to at least 350,000 m since 1994.

 

Marketing Brushwood from Western Australia 

In Western Australia, market penetration for brushwood products has been mainly in 

the  metropolitan  area,  but  there  are  good  prospects  for  extending  the  market  to 

Albany,  Bunbury,  Kalgoorlie  and  Geraldton.  It  would  assist  marketing  if  definitive 

data  could  be  obtained  to  demonstrate  the  claimed  superior  sound  attenuation 

properties of brushwood compared with metal or fibre­cement fencing. 

If prices to the consumer can be reduced and if the use of brushwood cladding can be 

promoted, then  there  is  every  prospect that  a  market  size  of  40,000  m  a  year  could 

develop in the State over the next 3­4 years. 

This size of market equates to 40,000 x 34.1 = 1,364,000 kg/year of 50 mm panel, or 

1364  tonnes.  Adjusting  for  green  weight,  this  is  1364  /  0.7  =  1948  tonnes  of  green 

harvested Brushwood, say 2000t. If the yield is 10 t/ha, about 200 ha per year would 

be required to support this level of market. If the yield is, say 15 t/ha, then only 133 

ha /year would be necessary. 

An important aspect of marketing is maintaining the good reputation of the product. It 

is  essential  to  avoid  instances  like  that  shown  below,  whether  it  be  caused  by  poor 

manufacturing standards or by poor installation practices. 

Figure 3. A sub standard Brushwood fence



11

 

Interstate/overseas markets 

Discussion  with  the  principal  of  one  manufacturer,  Solomit  (Victoria),  revealed  that 

they would accept Brushwood grown in Western Australia if the quality was right and 

the material could be landed in Horsham, Victoria, at the right price. When pressed on 

the price point, it was stated that the material would have to be landed at factory at no 

more than $16/bundle. A bundle weighs 22 kg and 900 bundles can be fitted on a 20 

tonne semitrailer. 

The price of $16/bundle equates to $720/tonne,  so allowing  for harvesting costs and 

transport to Horsham, interstate export of the raw material would appear to have some 

potential  for  local  growers.  The  low  transport  rates  for  back  loading  to  the  Eastern 

States will assist growers in this respect.  One of the main road transport companies 

operating  in  Perth  quoted  a  back  loading  discount  of  60­70%  on  freight  rates  from 

Sydney or Melbourne. 

Confirmation of the validity of this price estimate comes from the NSW Brushwood 

Industry  Group  (2004),  which  quoted  a  price  per  bundle  to  a  Brushwood  fence 

installer  in  the  Central  Coast  NSW  at  $18.50,  equivalent  to  $840/tonne.  However, 

Scarvelis  (2003)  quotes  a  figure  of  $9  to  $13  per  bundle,  i.e.,  only  $400­600  per 

tonne, although it is unclear at what point in the supply chain this applies. 

The  Baldivis  factory  operator  quotes  a  price  at  factory  door  of  only  $250­300  per 

tonne, but this is based on manual harvesting, similar to what is done in other States, 

and on a  long  haulage distance  from the  north­eastern Wheatbelt. It is reasonable to 

expect that machine harvesting of a much more concentrated resource in a Brushwood 

plantation,  close  to  a  Wheatbelt  factory,  would  be  much  more  efficient  and 

economical and give the grower a higher return. 

The  key  issue  in  this  case  is  ability  to  meet  the  industry  quality  specifications. 

Currently  this  is  doubtful  for  some  of  the  plantation  resource,  but  with  continuing 

effort to improve genetic quality of the Brushwood in Western Australia, it should be 

possible to meet this standard in future. 

There is no doubt that there is a demand for Brushwood of a suitable standard in both 

South  Australia  and  Victoria.  Bowman  (pers.  comm.)  states  that  about  75%  of  the 

Eastern  States  resource  now  comes  from  NSW  and  it  is  all  from  natural  stands. 

Harvesting  the  natural  resource  is  facing  pressure  from  green  activists  (Broombush 

Industry Group, 2006) and there is an expectation that the level of harvest will decline 

in the future. 

A plantation resource may well develop in other States, but even if it does, there could 

still  be  interstate  market  opportunities  for  unprocessed  Brushwood  for  Western 

Australian growers.


12



Yüklə 4,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə