Brushwood in Western Australia: Industry Development Plan 2008


Commercial Potential of WA Brushwood Species



Yüklə 4,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü4,38 Mb.
1   2   3

 

Commercial Potential of WA Brushwood Species 

Brushwood 

Species Selection 

All  harvest of Brushwood  in  Western  Australia  currently  comes  from  natural  stands 

on  private  land,  mostly  in  the  north­eastern  Wheatbelt.  While  there  has  been  some 

limited  trial  harvesting  of  plantation­grown  Brushwood  in  Western  Australia,  there 

are  no  available  data  on  its  commercial  acceptability  at  this  stage.  Initial  verbal 

feedback from two manufacturers was not encouraging. It is anticipated that proposed 

trials of machine harvesting and test panel construction in late 2008 will provide some 

much­needed information on this point. Evaluation of existing plantation resources is 

complicated by the mixed nature of the early plantings. Nevertheless it is possible to 

make a broad assessment of the potential for each species of Brushwood growing in 

the Wheatbelt. 

The assessment set out below is based on the published work of Brophy et al (2006) 

who studied foliar oil content, and Craven et al (2004), who redefined the taxonomic 

status of the Melaleuca uncinata complex in Western Australia. 

Table 1. Commercial Potential of Western Australian Brushwood Species 

Species 

Brushwood Panels  Oil Extraction 

M.uncinata 

No 


No 

M.interioris 

No 


No 

M.concreta 

No 


Possibly 

M.stereophloia 

No 


Possibly 

M.osullivanii 

No 


No 

M.hamata 

Yes 


Possibly 

M.atroviridis 

Yes 


Possibly 

M.zeteticorum 

No 


Possibly 

M.vinnula 

No 


No 

M.scalena 

No 


No 

M.exuvia 

No 


No 

On  the  basis  of  the  work  of  Craven  et  al  it  appears  that  only  two  local  species, 



M.atroviridis and M.hamata, are likely to be suitable for brushwood manufacture. As 

a result, these two species have been the focus of grower plantings in the last two or 

three years. 

However,  the  commercial  potential  of  Brushwood  is  more  complex  than  this  table 

would  indicate.  Within  the  most  favoured  species,  M.atroviridis,  there  are  two 

recognised  forms:  a  lower  slope  variety  that  has  poorer  form  and  does  not  resprout 

after  cutting,  and  an  upper  slope  form  that  has  better  form  and  does  resprout  after 

cutting. There  is anecdotal evidence that within the upper  slope  variety, plants  from 

certain sites have superior stem form and growth rate. It is unclear whether the same 

applies to M.hamata. For both species this is a critical issue that needs urgent further 

study.


13 

Another  factor  to  be  considered  is  the  nature  of  the  bark.  Some  varieties  of 

Brushwood  have  hard,  durable  bark,  which  is  sought  after  by  brushwood 

manufacturers. Others have softer bark that does not meet the durability requirement. 

Since the commercial acceptability of a plantation is critically dependent on its height, 

stem  straightness  and  low  incidence  of  forks,  the  benefit  of  investing  in  the  highest 

quality  genetic  material  is  apparent.  A  cooperative  approach  to  identify  the  best 

provenance  and  secure  the  germplasm  in  a  seed  production  area,  so  that  all  future 

plantings use superior quality seed, will be an important factor in creating a plantation 

resource in Western Australia that is suitable for commercial exploitation.



 

Quality Standards 

In  view  of  the  variation  in  the  growth  rate  and  form  of  current  farm  plantings  of 

Brushwood,  a  set of  standards  to  allow  a  grower  to  assess  the  value  of  a  plantation 

and  improve  resource  estimates  would  be  useful.  The  following  table  has  been 

developed  to  fulfil  this  need.  It  is  a  draft  set  of  key  attributes  that  needs  to  be  field 

tested and discussed with potential buyers, since it is the potential buyer who has the 

final  word  on  the  acceptability  of  a  plantation  for  brushwood  manufacture.  One 

manufacturer has already endorsed the proposed standard. 

The standard  is intended for use with a plantation crop that has grown to a height of 

about  1.6/1.8  m  and  assumes  that  the  stem  will  be  cut  at  about  20  cm  above  the 

ground. For Brushwood greater than 1.8 m in height, the assessment needs to start at 

the  third  fork  from  the  tip  to  comply  with  the  standard.  Cutting  would  occur  at the 

third fork. 

Table 2. Proposed Assessment Scheme for Plantation­Grown Brushwood 



Attribute 

Score 1 

Score 2 

Score 3 

Plant Height 

More than 1.5 m 

1.2 to 1.5 m 

Less than 1.2 m 

Stem  Straightness 

from  30  cm  above 

ground 


Essentially 

no 


deviations  in  9  out 

of 10 stems 

Slight 

bends 


or 

kinks in 5 out of 10 

stems 

Pronounced 



sweeps,  kinks  or 

bends  in  more  than 

5 out of 10 stems 

Stem  Diameter  at 

30 

cm 


above 

ground 


Generally 

Less 


than 10 mm 

Generally  10  mm 

to 15 mm 

Generally 

more 

than 15 mm 



Acute  angle  forks 

(less  than  20

°

)  in 


lower 30 cm 

No more than 1 out 

of 10 stems 

1­3 out of 10 stems 

More  than  3  out  of 

10 stems 

Wide  Angle  forks 

in lower 30 cm 

None 

No more than 1 out 



of 10 stems 

More  than  1  out  of 

10 stems 

A  score  of  8,  with  no  individual  attribute  score  of  3,  is  suggested  as  the  maximum 

acceptable  for  brushwood  manufacture.  An  example  of  how  a  grower  could  use  the 

table is given in Table 3 below. It is intended that the assessment would be made on, 

say, 6 representative sample plots of 10 trees in a row, distributed across the range of 

growth of the plantation.



14 

Table 3. Sample assessment of a plantation against the proposed Brushwood standard 



Attribute 

Your plantation 

Your score 

Height 


Plants are generally 1.5­1.7 m in height 

Stem straightness 



Essentially  no  deviations  in  9  out  of  10 

stems 


Diameter 

Stems generally less than 10 mm 

Acute angle forks 



Acute forks in 3 out of 10 stems 

Wide angle forks 



None 

Total=6, pass



 

By‐ products such as oil 

Extraction  of  oil  from  the  foliage  of  Melaleuca  species,  known  as  tea  tree  oil,  is  a 

commercial  business  in  Queensland,  although  it  has  not  developed  to  any  extent  in 

Western  Australia.  The  value  of  a  species  for  commercial  oil  extraction  depends  on 

the  chemical  composition  of  the  oil  and  there  is  an  existing  international  standard, 

ISO  4730, for tea tree oil. The table  in  Appendix 2 compares the oil contents of the 

WA  species  against  this  standard.  The  oil  content  data  for  the  Western  Australian 

species are taken from Brophy et al, 2006. The table indicates that some species have 

potential  for  use  for  oil  extraction,  but  the  data  are  highly  variable  for  each  species 

where there was more than one sample. 

No  Western  Australian  species  entirely  complies  with  the  ISO  standard,  although 

M.hamata  comes  closest.  For  commercial  development,  it  would  be  necessary  to 

carry  out  a  rigorous  selection  process  and  propagate  genotypes  with  the  desired  oil 

composition.  It  may  be  possible  to  select  a  genotype  of  M.hamata  that  has  both 

desirable  characteristics  for  brushwood  and  also  compliance  with  the  ISO  oil 

standard. This would require significant resources and costs, as well as some years to 

complete. 

Such  a  variety  would  offer  the  possibility  of  an  integrated  brushwood/oil  extraction 

operation that would be more economically viable than either activity alone. 

Oil composition is, of course, only part of the information that is needed. The yield by 

weight  of  the  foliage  is  also  a  critical  factor.  Research  on  M.alternifolia  in 

Queensland  has  shown  that  there  is  significant  variation  in  key  commercial  traits  at 

the  provenance,  family  and  individual  tree  levels.  Narrow  sense  heritability  was 

shown  to  be  high  for  oil  concentration,  moderate  for  some  oil  types  and  low  for 

growth parameters (Doran et al, 1996). 

Given  that  there  is  already  such  a  process  in  train  in  Queensland  with  the  preferred 

species for tea tree oil (M.alternifolia), it is doubtful that this will be a viable avenue 

for development in Western Australia at this stage, unless new uses are found for the 

dominant components of local species, or the market for ISO4730 standard tea tree oil 

improves. 

Discussions were held with two local commercial distiller firms as to their interest in 

utilising any of the local species for oil extraction. Neither was interested at this stage, 

but the possibility should still be kept in mind, as market requirements could change 

in the future. Kalannie Distillers is fully occupied with oil production from oil mallee


15 

plantations  and  Paperbark  Essential  Oils  at  Harvey  is  fully  occupied  with  other 

species.  However,  the  latter  does  have  an  active  research  and  development  program 

and  could  well  evolve  a  product that  uses  Melaleuca  oil  in  the  future.  The  Baldivis 

brushwood factory is also examining the potential for oil extraction from several local 

species, including Melaleuca.



16

 

Resources of Brushwood in WA 

Location of current plantings 

The  map  presented  below  shows  the  approximate  location  of  current  Brushwood 

plantations,  comprising  both  private  grower  and  MIS  plantings,  based  on  the 

inventory  data  provided.  According  to  Trees  Midwest  and  Trees  South  West  staff, 

there are no other significant plantations. It can be seen that the plantings have been 

well  concentrated  in  the  central  Wheatbelt  with  a  smaller  resource  in  the  southern 

Wheatbelt.  It  is  desirable  that  further  plantings  remain  concentrated  in  the  central 

zone, at least while the industry is in a developmental stage. 

Figure 4. Location of Recent Brushwood Plantings


17

 

Estimated resource availability 

In  making  an  estimate  of  potential  Brushwood  resources  from  plantations,  several 

aspects need to be considered:

 

·



  The number of seedlings surviving at harvest age at each plantation site.

 

·



  The  variety  planted.  Not  just  the  species,  but  the  precise  seed  source,  since 

there is considerable morphological variation within one species.

 

·

  The growth rate.



 

·

  The average green weight of a harvested plant.



 

·

  The commercial acceptability of the plantation, in terms of stem straightness, 



freedom from forking and freedom from pest damage. 

The weight per  plant at harvest is a key  factor in calculating a  yield projection. The 

only  published  data  are  contained  in  the  prospectus  for  an  MIS  company  (Rewards, 

2003), which assumes an average weight per  plant of 6 kg. This estimate appears to 

have  been  derived  from  sampling  natural  stands  of  Brushwood  in  the  northern 

Wheatbelt (Robinson and Emmott, 2005). The relevance of this approach to the yield 

from  plantations  in  the  Avon  Valley  and  the  northern  regions  is  not  known.  As  the 

natural stands are likely to have been older and grown more slowly, there might be a 

significant difference from material grown in plantations in a higher rainfall zone. 

In  a  local  cutting  trial  in  the  Avon  Valley,  16  plants  were  cut  and  weighed  at  four 

times of the  year  in  a  harvest at age 6  years. The plants were about 1.5 m  in  height 

and of good form and are believed to have been acceptable for brushwood production. 

The green weight for the whole 16 plants at each sampling date varied from 52 to 69 

kg. Using the mean weight of 60.5 kg per 16 plants, the average green weight of each 

plant was 60.5/16=3.8 kg, say 4 kg. In the absence of additional data, this figure has 

been used in resource calculations. Clearly, this figure requires further validation. It is 

possible that the weight per plant of the regrowth Brushwood after harvesting will be 

higher than that for the initial growth. Ideally, growers should have a graph of green 

weight against age of plant for each broad soil type used for plantations. 

Data  have  recently  become  available  from  a  machine  harvesting  trial  at  Southern 

Brook.  The  mean  plant  weight  varied  from  5.6  to  7.3  kg,  although  the  latter 

plantations  were  a  little  beyond  the  ideal  height  for  harvesting.  It  would  seem, 

therefore, that mean plant weight in a commercial harvesting operation could be 6 kg. 

A  rigorous  approach  to  resource  determination  would  also  require  an  inspection  of 

each individual plantation. This was not possible during the development of this plan, 

so assumptions have to be made. The development of some sort of acceptability index 

for brushwood manufacture would be a useful aid for growers. Such an index might 

be based on assessments of stem height, stem straightness and freedom from forking, 

along the lines suggested in Table 2 above. 

To  develop  resource  estimates,  several  assumptions  have  had  to  be  made.  For  the 

purposes of the estimates set out below, two scenarios have been produced, assuming 

a mean plant weight of either 4 kg or 6 kg. Depending on the planting data supplied, a 

survival rate of 80% or a stocking figure of 2500 plants per ha has been assumed and 

all usable plantations have been assumed to be available for harvesting at age 6. The



18 

harvest age of 6 is based on growth rates on a limited number of plantations, and will 

no doubt, in practice, vary from site to site. 

For private growers we have data on the number of seedlings or the area planted each 

year,  but  we  have  very  little  data  on  the  MIS  plantations.  There  has  been  some 

harvesting  of  the  latter  in  2008  and  it  is  believed  that  some  varieties  planted  are 

unlikely  to  be  commercially  acceptable.  It  is  assumed  that  the  MIS  effective 

plantations still available are : 

50 ha planted in 2003 

50 ha planted in 2004 

50 ha planted in 2005 

It is further assumed that the effective stocking is 2500 plants/ha, allowing for some 

deaths.

 

Northern region 

The 2006 planting was the first in this region and comprised 3 unknown sub­species 

of  M.uncinata.  It  is  likely  that  much  of  this  year’s  planting  comprised  unsuitable 

genotypes. Some is also likely to have been established on sites that were not optimal 

for growth. For the purposes of this estimate it is assumed that only one third of the 

area planted is suitable for brushwood manufacture. 

The total estimated number  of plants surviving at  year 1  is estimated to be 235,000, 

based on data received from Georgie Troup. One third of this figure is 78,000. At the 

nominal harvest age of 6 years, this resource would be available in 2012 assuming all 

grows at about the same rate. 

In  2007,  the  planting  used  only  M.atroviridis  and  M.hamata,  both  of  which  are 

believed  to  be  suitable  for  brushwood.  The  net  surviving  number  of  plants  is 

estimated to be 489,000 and all plantings are assumed to be commercially acceptable, 

and would become available in 2013. 

The  expected  planting  for  2008,  using  the  same  average  80%  survival  rate  as  in 

previous years, the net number of surviving plants is 346,000, implying a resource for 

2014. 

These data have been combined to produce the table below. 



Table 4. Estimated Northern Region Resource Availability (tonnes) 

Year Planted 

Year for 

Harvest 

Est. No. Plants 

Est. Yield 

(4 kg/plant) 

Est. Yield 

(6 kg/plant) 

2006 


2012 

78,000 


312 

468 


2007 

2013 


489,000 

1960 


2940 

2008 


2014 

346,000 


1380 

2070


 

Avon Valley 

Somewhat different assumptions were made for the Avon Valley resource, due to the 

different  way  the  data  were  available.  All  the  seedlings  were  assumed  to  be  either 

M.atroviridis or M.hamata.


19 

Table 5. Estimated Avon Valley Resource Availability (tonnes) 



Year planted 

Year 

for 

harvest 

Est. 

No. 

Plants 

Est. yield 

(4 kg/plant) 

Est. Yield 

(6 kg/plant) 

1999 


2005 

12,500 


50 

75 


2000 

2006 


12,500 

50 


75 

2001 


2007 

12,500 


50 

75 


2002 

2008 


41,000 

164 


246 

2003 


2009 

32,500 


130 

195 


2004 

2010 


45,000 

180 


270 

2005 


2011 

52,500 


210 

315 


2006 

2012 


100,000 

400 


600 

2007 


2013 

363,750 


1455 

2180 


2008 

2014 


160,000 

512 


770 

Some loss of resource will result from undesirable genetic material being used in the 

first few years of planting, but this is not significant overall.

 

Southern region 

Planting of Brushwood also took place around Katanning in 2007 and 2008. It is also 

assumed that all plantings are either M.atroviridis or M.hamata. 

Table 6. Estimated Southern Region Resource Availability (tonnes) 

Year Planted 

Year 

for 

Harvest 

Est. 

No. 

Plants 

Est. Yield 

(4 kg/plant) 

Est. Yield 

(6 kg/plant) 

2007 


2013 

96,000 


384 

576 


2008 

2014 


68,000 

272 


408 

We can combine the data for all regions to produce an overall estimate of Brushwood 

resources, shown below. 

Figure  5.  Estimated  Brushwood  resource  availability  2009­2014  (tonnes/year) 

from private grower sources (plant weight 4 kg)


20 

Figure 6. Estimated Brushwood resource 2009­2014 (t/year) from private grower 

sources (plant weight 6 kg). 

The graphs indicate that there will be only a small resource from private growers until 

2012, then a moderate level of resource until 2013, when it suddenly escalates to over 

3000 t/year at 4 kg/plant and over 5000 t/year at 6 kg/plant. 

In practice, however,  it will  be possible to smooth out the supply to some  extent by 

bringing forward the harvest of some faster­growing areas and postponing harvest of 

slower­growing areas. Nevertheless, the potential for overproduction is clear, unless a 

large  market  can  be  found.  Planning  a  harvest  program  will  therefore  require  quite 

detailed  knowledge  about  each  plantation.  A  process  for  gathering  these  data  and 

carrying out the planning process needs to be developed.



 

MIS Resource 

Using  assumptions  for available  area set out above,  namely, 50  ha available  in each 

year,  the  MIS  plantings  are  estimated  to  yield  either  500  t/year  (4  kg/plant)  or  750 

t/year (6 kg/plant) in  each of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Parts of the MIS  plantation that 

were harvested in 2008 may yield a second crop in 2014, estimated again to be 500 or 

750 t. If this resource is added to the private grower resource, the yield is considerably 

increased in the next 3 years, as shown in Figures 7 and 8 below. 

Figure 7. Combined private and MIS Brushwood resource (tonnes, plant weight 

4 kg)


21 

Figure 8. Combined private and MIS resource (tonnes, plant weight 6 kg) 

There  is  very  limited  value  in  retaining  older  crops  of  Brushwood  beyond  the 

optimum  harvest  age,  as  continued  growth  means  that  they  no  longer  meet  the 

brushwood  standard  specification,  especially  if  machine  harvesting  is  to  be  used. 

Hand  harvesting could cope with older  crops  much  better, as the cutter  can vary the 

height of the cut for each plant as required. 

These  estimates  are  only  a  general  indication  of  the  resource  situation,  given  the 

caveats  expressed  above.  We  cannot  produce  a  reliable  estimate  of  resource 

availability  until  there  is  an  assessment  of  each  individual  crop  against the  standard 

and  more  data  is  obtained  from  the  MIS  sector.  Nevertheless,  the  possibility  of  an 

oversupply of Brushwood is there. 

The  question  to  be  considered  now  is  how  this  resource  flow  equates  to  possible 

commercial requirements.

1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə